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A late Victorian era campaign medal pair: Lance Corporal William Thomas Masterson, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers

- IGS 1895. 'PF' 'Tir 97-8' 'Samana 97' (4825 Pte. W. Masterson, 1st Bn. Ryl. Sco: Fus:)
- QSA Medal. 'Transvaal' 'South Africa 02' (4825 L. Corpl. W. Masterton. Rl. Scots Fus.)

Important: Both medals and all clasps verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of 1st & 2nd Battalions Royal Scots Fusiliers as under;

- IGS 1895 Medal and 3 x clasps: Ref WO 100/87
- QSA Medal and 2 clasps: Ref WO 100/180 (shown as Masterton)

William Masterson was a native of the parish of St Peter's, Woolwich, Kent, England, where he was born circa 1876. William enlisted in the British Army, at London, England, on 2 January 1895, at which time he claimed to be 18 years & 1 month of age, and described himself as a 'Barman'. At time of enlistment he expressed a desire to join the Royal Scots Fusiliers, which regiment he was posted to from 2 January 1895. William subsequently serv ed 5 years overseas in India and then South Africa, during which he saw action on the North West Frontier of India, and later in the closing stages of the South African War. During his service with the Royal Scots Fusiliers he served as under;

- Home: 02/01/1895-08/02/1897
- India: 09/02/1897-09/02/1902
- South Africa: 10/02/1902-13/12/1902
- Home: 14/02/1902-01/01/1907

William transferred to the Army Reserve on 20 December 1902, and took his discharge from the British Army on 1 July 1907, by which time he had completed his 12 years service contract, comprising 7 years with 'The Colours' & 5 years with the 'Army Reserve'

The medals mounted for display in the swing-style. The mounting bar retaining the original long hinged pin and clasp fittings on reverse

Condition: About GVF

Code: 18987Price:


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A unique medal group to a former Munster Fusilier, who earned a 'Best Shot of Volunteer in India' Medal: Sergeant Edward Alexander Cation, North West Railway Machine Gun Corps, late Royal Munster Fusiliers, East Surrey Regt & Agra Volunteer Rifles

- QSA Medal. 'Orange Free State' & 'S.A. 1902' (6222 Corpl. E. Cation. Rl: Muns: Fus:)
- 1914-15 Star (No. 1 Sgt. E. A. Cation, N. W. Ry. Machine Gun Corps.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (1 Sgt. E. A. Cation. M. G. Section.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1 Sgt. E. A. Cation. M. G. Section.)
- Volunteer Force LSM: GV issue (Pte. E. A. Cation 1/24th N.W.Rly Bn. I.D.F.)
- British India: Best Shot of the Volunteers Medal (officially engraved naming - see below)

Note: The BWM only with some minor official corrections

Best Shot of Volunteers: The last medal is attractively engraved on reverse '1st 2nd & 3rd Div 1912-13 Corpl E. A. Cation North Western Ry. Vol. Rifles 47 points'

Unique: The recipient Edward Cation is unique as being only the only former Royal Munster Fusilier to have earned this combination of medals and clasps

British India: Best Shot of the Volunteers Medal

Metal: Silver

Dimension: 47mm

Weight: 64g

Suspension: Claw with ornate floreate swivel scroll suspender

Obverse: Around the legend Presented By The Government of India'. In centre a soldier wearing tropical helmet lying in the prone position with rifle. Behind an Indian scene featuring a mountain, and jungle

Reverse: Circular legend 'Best Shot Of The Volunteers' with laurel wreath and scroll on top. Centre blank for engraving

Instituted in 1880, this rare medal was competed for annually amongst the various Volunteer Units of the Bengal Presidency

The medals were struck in Calcutta by the Calcutta Mint, and the annual recipient was allowed to keep the medal, which was authorised for wear on the right breast of Volunteers uniform tunic suspended from a 'Green' silk riband (Ref 'Mayo' for specific details of this rare medal)

A most substantial and impressive medal

Edward Alexander Cation, son of William Nottman Cation (born to James and Phebe Cation at Secunderabad in 1843) was born in Calcutta in 1876. Edward, was of Eurasian descent, his grandfather being No 699 Sergeant James Cation of the 4th King's Own Regiment who had married an 'Indo Briton' lady and settled in India. Edward had served in the Agra Volunteer Rifles before attesting for the East Surrey Regiment in Agra in August 1894. He transferred to the Royal Munster Fusiliers in 1898 and served with the 2nd Battalion in the South Africa during the Boer War, after which he returned to India and was posted to the Army Reserve in 1902

Cation worked as a Guard for the N.W. Railway and served as a Volunteer in the North West Railway Rifles, with which unit he was serving when he won the prestigious 'Best Shot of Volunteers in India Medal' that he contested in the year 1912-1913

Edward's employer, The North West Railway ran the important Khyber Pass and North West Frontier route, carrying troops and supplies along the Frontier at times of unrest.

During the Great War, Edward served overseas in East Africa with the Machine Gun Section of the North West Railway Volunteer Rifles, holding the unique regimental No 1, indicating that he was the very first 'soldier - and most senior Non Commissioned Officer - to serve with the N.W. Ry. M.G.C. The Machine Gunners of the North West Railway M.G.C. were the only unit of that volunteer railway corps to serve overseas outside of India during the Great War. The unit served in East Africa where it saw extensive service in the military operations in German East Africa, i.e., Tanganyika . The unit remained in theatre until 1917, in which year Indian forces were withdrawn from East Africa

Edward Cation is recorded as having died at Lahore, Punjab, India on 12 February 1944 - and was buried there the very same day at the Christian Cemetery of the St Andrew's. Church. At the time of his death he was 66 years of age, and described as a 'Retired Guard N.W.R.'

Sold together with various hard copy research inc service papers and extracts from QSA medal roll

The reverse of medal ribands with some soiling having been previously mounted for display

A unique and impressive medal group, the recipient Edward Cation being the only former Royal Munster Fusilier to have earned this particular combination of medals and clasps

Claw loose on Best Shot medal

Condition: Mostly about GVF

Code: 19699Price:


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A scarce long serving 'Durham' volunteer's campaign & long service group of 4: Private William Alfred Bone, Durham Light Infantry & Durham Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers

- 1914-15 Star (9225 Pte - A. Sjt. - W. A. Bone. Durh L I.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (9225 Pte. W A. Bone Durh. L. I.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (9225 Pte. W A. Bone Durh. L. I.)
- Volunteer Force LSM. EDVII issue (5841. Pte. W. A. Bone. 2/ Durham. R.G.A.V.)

The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2801
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1655

A very scarce combination of otherwise common medals all named to a mix of 'Durham' Artillery & Infantry units

William Alfred Bone, son of Melvin Bone (Chimney Sweep) and Sarah Bone, was a native of the Parish of St Margaret, Durham City, County Durham, England, where he was born in 1876, and where he was baptized on 21 May 1876. William married Margaret Louise Flowers, in Durham, on 17 June 1897. By the time of the 1911 National Census for England & Wales, William is shown as living with his wife Margaret Louise Bone, at their home located at 12 South Street, Durham. By trade a 'Mason & Chimney Sweep' William cited having served for 21 years with the 'Durham Volunteers' prior to the time he enlisted with the British Army for service in the Great War, at Durham, on 4th September 1914 - and a very early 'Volunteer' for active overseas service, his engagement being for 'One Years Service or Duration of the War', when he was posted to the Durham Light Infantry (Special Reserve) on 4th September 1914. William was on the strength of 4th (Special Reserve) Battalion Durham Light Infantry from 9 September 1914, until later in 1915 being posted to the 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry. By the time that William first entered theatre of war 'France' on 28 August 1915, he was holding the appointment Private 'Acting Sergeant' - which is a most unusual rank to see impressed on a campaign medal. Tragically, William's wife, is recorded as having died in Durham on 7 September 1915, at which time William was serving overseas in France and Flanders with the British Expeditionary Force

It is not known when Lance-Sergeant Bone was notified of his wife's death, but it is highly likely that it was due to the grief of losing his wife, that his otherwise exemplary record of military conduct, suffered for the worse when he incurred the wrath of a Field General Court Marshal in November 1915, due to 'Drunkeness' while on active service, and as a a consequence was reduced in rank to Private and received 90 Days Field Punishment No 2!

William Bone remained in France & Flanders through to 21st May 1917. He was sent back to France 28th July 1917 and transferred to the Labour Corps on 15th November 1918. William Bone was discharged from the British Army on 1 February 1919

Research: There are no papers sold with the medals - we will however forward 'soft copy' via ebay messages, JPEG files, of all below for the buyers records;

- Medal Index Card
- Extract page from 1914-15 Star medal roll
- Extract page from British War & Interallied Victory Medal rolls

The recipients service papers are extant and accessible at The National Archives - due to size we will not be copying or forwarding those!

Medals mounted for display in the court style on card with red flock backing

Condition: About VF

Code: 19744Price:


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An early 1916 casualty group of 3 to the 5th City Pals Battalion Manchester Regiment: Private James Wilkinson 20th (Service) Battalion (5th City) Manchester Regiment

- 1914-15 Star (18066 Pte. J. Wilkinson. Manch: R.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (18066 Pte. J. Wilkinson. Manch. R.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (18066 Pte. J. Wilkinson. Manch. R.)

Important: Private James Wilkinson is confirmed as 'Died of Wounds', France, on 29 March 1916

The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the 20th (Service) Battalion (5th City Pals) Manchester Regiment as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2801
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/2780

Reference 'Commonwealth War Graves Commission', the source shows that the recipient was the son of Mrs M.J. Wilkinson who resided at, 439, Ashton Old Rd., Openshaw, Manchester

See the Manchester Evening News issue of 7 April 1916, for report on the recipients death in action, together with a named portrait photograph of James Wilkinson in uniform

The medals have all been fitted with approximately 6 x inch lengths of new medal ribbon

Condition: GVF

Code: 19704Price:


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A 'World Wars' multi campaign and long service medal group of 7: Sergeant John Donaldson, 1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry

- 1914-15 Star (10816 Pte J Donaldson Durh L. I.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (10816 Pte J Donaldson Durh L. I.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (10816 Pte J Donaldson Durh L. I.)
- The 1939-45 Star
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- Military LS&GC Medal. GV second type (4435289 Sjt J Donaldson Durh L. I.)

Important: Recipient confirmed first entered theatre of war on the Landakai Ridge in the North West Frontier of India on 21 August 1915 (per Para.5 (i) of notes on theatres of war for the award of the 1914-15 Star)

Note: The inclusion of the 1939-45 Star in the recipients medal group indicates qualifying campaign service with the BEF in France 1940

The Great War campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Durham Light Infantry, as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2789
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1631

The 1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry was in India in August 1914, and was one of the very few regular British Army infantry battalions to remain in India throughout the course of the Great War, during which men of 1/DLI participated in several medal qualifying campaigns on the North West Frontier of India, including action against the Mohmand tribe in 1915

Sergeant John Donaldson is confirmed as having enlisted in the British Army in 1909 (the regimental number is recorded as having been issued to a soldier of the Durham Light Infantry on ), and continued to serve with the Durham Light Infantry and the British Army post 1920, being allocated a unique Army Number 44435289 in 1920, which was in the block allocated to the Durham Light Infantry

The medals mounted in the swing-style, and as worn by the recipient, the medal all suspended from contemporary silk ribands. The reverse of the medal mounting retaining the original hinged pin and clip fittings

Research: There are no papers sold with the medals - we will however forward 'soft copy' of all below to the buyer by email attachment;

- Medal Index Card
- Extract page from 1914-15 Star medal roll
- Extract page from British War & Interallied Victory Medal rolls

Some fraying to silk ribands

Condition: About VF

Code: 19746Price:


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A Regimental Sergeant Major's 'Dunkirk Casualty' campaign and long service medal group of 6: Regimental Sergeant Major George Wilson, Durham Light Infantry

- 1914-15 Star (13965 Pte. G. Wilson. Durh. L.I.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (13965 Pte. G. Wilson. Durh. L.I.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (13965 Pte. G. Wilson. Durh. L.I.)
- The 1939-45 Star
- War Medal
- Military LSGC. GVI Regular Army' (4442943 W.O. Cl II G. Wilson. Durh. L. I. )

Important: Regimental Sergeant Major George Wilson, 9th (Territorial) Battalion Durham Light Infantry was severely 'Wounded in Action' by Gunshot & Shrapnel Wound (GSW) in France on 31 May 1940

R.S.M. Wilson was wounded while serving with the British Expeditionary Force on the defensive perimeter at Dunkirk (his wound is recorded in the official British Army Casualty Lists 1939-1945, held at the National Archives reference WO 417/13)

The Great War campaign medals are all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Durham Light Infantry, as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2791
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1655

Photograph & Article: A photograph of Regimental Sergeant Major Wilson on his wedding day, wearing uniform with his Great War and LSGC medal ribbons up and with peaked cap with cap badge together with his bride was published in the the 'Newcastle Evening Chronicle' issue of 27 March 1941;

Quote,

Gateshead R.S.M. Wheeled to his Wedding

Still unable to walk due to wounds received on May 31 while serving with the Durham Light Infantry in France, Regimental Sergeant-Major of Gateshead, was married in a wheelchair at a Shropshire Church to Miss Vera. M. Anderson, of Newcastle.

R.S.M. Wilson, also served with the Durham Light Infantry in France and Flanders during the Great War

In hospital he has been visited by C.S.M. W. Burkitt, of another battalion of the D.L.I., who has since received a commission with the rank of Lieutenant

Unquote.

George 'Biff' Wilson, son of Teasdale Wilson (Waterman & Bargee) & Ann Wilson (nee Brown) was a native of Gateshead, Northumberland, England, where he was born on 9 October 1897. At the time of the 1911 National Census for England & Wales, George (13) was recorded as both being at 'School - Part-time' and additionally employed as an Errand Boy. At the time of the Census he was living at the family home located at the 'Old Engine Cottages' Gateshead, where he lived with his parents and 2 x elder sisters, viz Helen (21) and Ann (19) a 'Schoolboy' and employed 'Errand Boy'

Very shortly after the outbreak of the Great War, and when still only just 16 years of age, George Wilson enlisted in the British Army, and was posted to his local infantry regiment the Durham Light Infantry. George first entered theatre of war 'France' on 26 August 1915, when he disembarked at Boulogne, France, with 13th (Service) Battalion Durham Light Infantry

George Wilson was either 'Wounded', or otherwise impaired during the Great War, but his wounds were not the cause of his discharge in 1919, which were due to 'Kings Regulation XVia', which was “Surplus to military requirements (having suffered impairment since entry into the service). George took his discharge from the British Army on 24 April 1919 , but his return to 'Civvy Street' was short-lived, as he later re-enlisted in his former local regiment, the Durham Light Infantry in which he was allocated to the unique 'Army Number' 4442943 from the block of army numbers allocate to the DLI in 1920. George served with the 1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry through to at least 1930, and continued to serve with the DLI throughout the rest of the inter-war years era, with 1/DLI serving at below locations in that period;

- 1920: Germany (Army of Occupation)
- 1921: York, England
- 1925: Northern Ireland (Ballykinlar)
- 1927: Egypt
- 1930: England (Catterick)
- 1937: China (Shanghai)
- 1939: China (Tientsin)

The 1924-1930 absentee voters list for the borough of Gateshead, County Durham, shows that 4442943 Sergeant George Wilson, 1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry, was an absentee registered voter of the Oakwell Polling District C, who was otherwise recorded as a resident of 14 Quarryfield Road, Gateshead. By April 1939, the National Register of England for England & Wales records George as R.S.M. serving with 9th Battalion Durham Light Infantry, and residing at, 31 Burt Terrace, Gathead, together with both of his parents. George emained with 9/DLI through to mobilization and deployment with the British Expeditionary Force to France & Flanders in 1940

In France, 9/DLI, was one of three DLI battalions to serve in the 151st 'Durham' Infantry Brigade, under 50th Division. The Durhams of 151st Brigade earned considerable fame and kudos during the Second World War, with Field Marshall Montgomery later saying of them;

Quote,

Of all the infantry regiments in the British Army, the DLI was one most closely associated with myself during the war. The DLI Brigade [151st Brigade] fought under my command from Alamein to Germany ...It is a magnificent regiment. Steady as a rock in battle and absolutely reliable on all occasions. The fighting men of Durham are splendid soldiers; they excel in the hard-fought battle and they always stick it out to the end; they have gained their objectives and held their positions even when all their officers have been killed and condition were almost unendurable

Unquote

In May 1940, 9/DLI, and the rest of 151st 'Durham' Brigade was heavily engaged at Ypres, and in the fallback to the Dunkirk perimeter began. By 30 May the brigade was entrenched between the Bergues and Ringsloot canals and reinforced by some remnants from 70th Brigade, repulsing German attacks on the 31st May 1940, on which date Regimental Sergeant Major Wilson was 'Wounded in Action'. Fortunately for George 'Biff' Wilson, he together with the rest of the Durham Brigade embarked embarked for Britain from the Dunkirk mole late on 1 June 1940

George Wilson married Vera Maude Anderson, at Oswestry, Shropshire, England, on 15 March 1941

George Wilson is recorded as having died at Gateshead, County Durham, England, on 16 June 1984

The medals mounted in the swing-style, all suspended from contemporary silk ribands. The reverse of the medal mounting retaining the original hinged pin and clip fittings

Research: There are no papers sold with the medals - we will however forward 'soft copy' by email of all below for the buyers records;

- Medal Index Card
- Extract page from 1914-15 Star medal roll
- Extract page from British War & Interallied Victory Medal rolls

A superb Regimental Sergeant Major's campaign and long service medal group to a 'Dunkirk' casualty

Condition: Mostly VF

Code: 19743Price:


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An Officer of Royal Marines, and resident of Yeovil, Somerset, 'Wounded-in-Action' at Inchy-et-Artois, casualty group of 4: Second Lieutenant Herbert Baker, 1st Royal Marine Battalion, late 2nd Royal Marine Battalion, 63rd Naval Division

- British War Medal. Silver issue (2.Lt. H. Baker. R.M.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (2.Lt. H. Baker. R.M.)
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- Silver War Badge: Reverse numbered RN43601

Sold together with;

- Society of Miniature Rifle Clubs: Bell Medal. Bronze
- Air Raid Recaustion (A.R.P.). GVI issue lapel badge. Male issue, with silver hallmarks for London 1938

Important: 2nd Lieutenant Herbert Baker was serving with 1st Royal Marine Battalion, 63rd (Royal Naval) Division, when he was 'Wounded-in-Action' by 'Gunshot & Shrapnel Wound' (or, GSW) to the face, with High Explosive shell fragment to his lower jaw. His wound was is recorded as incurred on 6 September 1918, at Inchy-et-Trois - a village with a 'Lock' on the Canal Du Nord, where 1 RM Battalion had been engaged since 2 September 1918 in repulsing German counter attacks at and in the vicinity of Inchy-et Trois

The Great War campaign medals & Silver War Badge are all verified as issued per the respective campaign medal & silver war badge rolls of the Royal Marines as under;

- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref ADM 171/192
- Silver War Badge: Ref ADM 171/186

Note: The SWB RN43601 was not ascribed or recorded in the Admiralty rolls as awarded to any specific recipient, but that the numbered badge was sent to R.M.L.I. Gosport on 29 July 1919 and where it was issued from stock (to Herbert Baker)

Herbert Baker son of Elias Baker (latterly Foreman Manager of a Web and Twine Weaver) & Alice Baker (nee Hackwell ) was a native of East Coker, Yeovil, Somerset, England, where he was born on 11 November 1897. Herbert was the last born child of Elias & Alice Baker, his 6 x other siblings who in order of date of birth were; John (brother), Annie (sister), Ada Maud (sister), Maud (sister), William George (brother) & Ernest. By the time of 1911 National Census for England & Wales, Herbert was described as a 'Scholar' residing at home together with his parents and four of his other siblings and living at the returned postal address of, North Coker, Yeovil.

Herbert, by denomination a Baptist (Plymouth Bretheren), and described as a 'Web Weaver' attested as a Private for the Royal Marines at Yeovil, Somerset, on 8 December 1916. He served during the Great War with the Expeditionary Force on the Western Front from 27 March 1917, and was commissioned as an officer holding the temporary appointment of Second Lieutenant on 6 November 1917. His officers service papers (held & accessible at The National Archives) record that he was wounded in action on 6 September 1918 at 'Inchy' (but this date is more likely to have been the date he was actually admitted to hospital, as the battalion war diary only records officer casualties on 2 & 5 September 1918) In the fighting to repulse the Germans attacking and capturing the 'Lock' at Inchy-et-Artois (on the Canal du Nord) 1 RM Battalion incurred casualties of 38 x 'All-Ranks' killed and 112 'All Ranks' wounded in the series of actions in the vicinity of Inchy-et-Artois between 2-7 September 1918. 2nd Lieutenant Herbert Jones was hospitalized between 6th September to 30 May 1919, and was was subsequently invalided and from the Royal Marines in the same year

The medals mounted for display on a board in the court style

The lot is accompanied by hard copy of the recipients 'Other Ranks' service sheets & some typed collectors notes

Condition: About EF

Code: 19763Price:


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A Pipe-Majors group of 7: Pipe-Major D. 'Swank' McLeod, 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders

- British War Medal. Silver issue (3-7366 Pte. D. Macleod. Seaforth)
- Interallied Victory Medal (3-7366 Pte. D. Macleod. Seaforth)
- IGS Medal 1908. GV 'North West Frontier 1930-31' (2810142 Sjt. D. Mac Leod.Seaforth)
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- Military LSGC. GVI 'Regular Army' (2810142. W.O.Cl.2. D. Macleod. Seaforth)
- Efficiency Medal, GVI first 'Territorial' (2810142 W.O.Cl.2. D. McLeod, Seaforth)

The group court mounted for display.

Pipe-Major Donald 'Swank' Macleod served during the Great War with the 2nd and 7th Battalions Seaforth Highlanders, the former''s Pipers (of which Macleod is listed in the Regimental records) were, ''largely employed as runners, orderlies, etc., and suffered very heavy casualties. On several occasions during the open fighting they were employed in the attack as pipers. Of 23 pipers who went to France with the battalion 6 were killed and 10 wounded in the first year of the war. The opinion of the officers is that only the difficulty of reinforcements limits the employment of pipers in action.''

Provenance: Matt Taylor Collection, Christies (London) 1983

Research: The medals accompanied with some copied research including photograph of recipient in uniform, as part of the 'Highland Brigade Gathering Cawnpore, 1931 - Pipe Majors'

Condition: Great Wars medal polished GF, others GVF

Code: 10967Price: 1975.00 GBP


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A 'Twice Wounded' group of 4 to an Infantry Officer wounded at the 'Somme' in 1916 & during the 'Spring Offensive of 1918: Captain Arthur Marsden Hey, 7th (Service) Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, later Royal Air Force and West Riding Cadet Force

- British War Medal. Silver issue (Capt. A. M. Hey.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (Capt. A. M. Hey.)
- Defence Medal
- Cadet Forces Medal. GVI issue (A/Capt. A. M. Hey.)

Important: Confirmed from sources as 'Wounded-in-Action' 10 July 1916, at Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle Support, when he received 'Gunshot & Shrapnel Wound ' (GSW) to his left foot. and secondly between 21-31 March 1918 during German Spring Offensive

Note: The Great War campaign verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of East Yorkshire Regiment Ref WO 329/1655

Arthur Marsden Hey, son of Harry Hey (Chemist) and Annie Eliza Hey (nee Newsome) was a native of, Dewsbury, Yorkshire, England, where he was born on, 25 January 1894. He studied Chemistry at Leeds University, and served as a Corporal in the Leeds University O.T.C. Hey was commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant in the East Yorkshire Regiment in November 1915. He served with the 7th (Service) Battalion in the French theatre of war from 19 May 1916. Hey served with the Battalion as part of the 50th Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division on the Somme in July 1916

Hey was wounded in action during the attack on Quadrangle Alley and Quadrangle Support, 10 July 1916. The Regimental History gives the following:

‘At 1pm the G.S.O. I, 17th Division, arrived at 7th Battalion H.Q. with orders for yet another attempt on Quadrangle Alley, Quadrangle Support, the left (western) end of Wood Support, and the south-west corner of Mametz Wood. This attack took place at 5.45pm, but was also unsuccessful. “All ranks,” records the Battalion Diary, “carried out their orders most gallantly, but all attacks failed.” Two more officers (Lieutenant E. Wing and 2nd Lieutenant Hey) had been wounded, and other rank casualties were about 140.’

The Regimental History also records Hey as being wounded during the German Spring Offensive of 1918, and as being one of 19 officers and 400 other ranks casualties suffered by the 7th Battalion between 21-31 March 1918.

Having advanced to Temporary Captain, Hey transferred to the Royal Air Force in September 1918. He was demobilised in January 1919, but re-engaged as Second Lieutenant in the West Riding Army Cadet Force, 25 November 1942. He advanced to Acting Captain in April 1945 (awarded Cadet Forces Medal in July 1951), and retired in 1959

Arthur Marsden Hey, of 38 Warren Street, Savile Town, Dewsbury, Yorkshire, England, is recorded as having died at the General Hospital Dewsbury, on 4 February 1965, and was succeeded by his widow Alma Rena Hey (nee Hemingway)

The medals mounted in the swing-style, all suspended from contemporary silk ribands and as worn by the recipient. The reverse of the medal mounting retaining the original hinged pin and clip fittings

Sold with some accompanying typed collectors research card and photograph of the medals

Condition: About EF

Code: 19762Price:


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A Great War era Edinburgh City Special Constabulary medal group of 2: Constable Stanislaus Moore, Edinburgh City Special Constabulary & late 'Royal Warrant' holder

- Special Constabulary Medal. GV & clasp 'The Great War 1914-18' (Stanislaus Moore)
- Edinburgh City Special Constabulary. War Service Long Service Medal 1914

Sold together with;

a). City of Edinburgh Special Constables cap badge. With Kings Crown. Complete with slider on reverse as issued

Stanislaus Theodore Beeston Moore, son of Robert Beeston Moore (Hotel Keeper) & Izabel Moore (nee ) was a native of Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, where he was born on 219 September 1863. Stanislaus became a well known citizen of Edinburgh, where he became a prominent member of the Edinburgh business community. Stanislaus was appointed a 'Royal Warrant Holder' and the use of the title 'By Appointment' to His Majesty King George V, as a supplier of 'Fruit & Vegetables' to the Royal Household, his 'Royal Warrant' appointment being published in the Scotsman newspaper issue of 4 January 1922. By profession Stanislaus was a 'Fruit Merchant', with premises located a,t 12 Drumsheugh Place, Edinburgh. Stanislaus Moore is recorded as having died at Edinburgh, Scotland on 30th September 1932, on which date he was living at the family residence located at 12 Lonsdale Terrace, Edinburgh.

The medals mounted as worn by the recipient in the swing-style, suspended from original silk ribands. Reverse of mounting bar retaining the long hinged pin and clasp fittings

The Edinburgh City Special Constables 'Great War Medal' and related cap badge scarce seen

Condition: About EF

Code: 19691Price:

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