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A South African War campaign medal pair to a former 'Miner' from Penicuik, Midlothian: Private George Nivison, 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

- QSA Medal. 4 clasps CC, Pa, Drief, Trans (5577 Pte. G. Nivison, 2nd Rl. Highldrs:)
- KSA Medal. 2 clasps 'SA 01' & 'SA 02' (5577 Pte. G. Nivision. Rl: Highrs:)

Important: Both medals and all 6 x clasps verified as entitled per the respective medal rolls as under;

- Queens South Africa Medal: Ref WO 100/190
- Kings South Africa Medal: Ref WO 100/334

George Nivison, son of Thomas and Ann Nivison, was a native of Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland, where he is confirmed as being born on 22 September 1872 (birth certificate refers). George claimed to be 18 years and 10 months of age, and employed as a 'Miner', when on 24 July 1894, he enlisted for service in the British Army, at Edinburgh, Scotland. He joined the army under a 'Short Service' engagement (7 years with 'The Colours' and 5 years on the Army Reserve') for service with 'The Royal Highlanders', subsequently being posted to 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), which regiment he remained with throughout his time in the British Army. At enlistment, George cited being a serving member of his local volunteer unit, vis 6th Volunteer Battalion Royal Scots.George Nivison's service record (extant and accessible at The National Archives) shows service - including war service in South Africa, as under;

- Home (including Ireland) 24/07/1894 - 21/10/1899 (5 years 90days)
- South Africa: 22/10/1899 - 12/09/1902 (2 years 326 days)
- Home: 13/09/1902 - 23/07/1906 (3 years 314 days)

His service papers show that his father Thomas Nivison, resident of Parkend, Penicuik, Midlothian, was his notified next of kin

George Nivison was transferred to the Army Reserve on 30 September 1902, and he took his final discharge from the British Army on 23 July 1906, on which date his obligations on the Army Reserve terminated. After leaving the British Army, George returned to his native Penicuik, where he was employed as a 'Papermill Worker'. George married Isabella Cockburn (a Papermill Worker aged 32) at Penicuik on 27 June 1914. George did not serve during the Great War, and is recorded as having died at Edinburgh, on 8 October 1926. At the time of his death his usual residence was 24 Bridge Street, Penicuik. His widow died on 31 October 1956

Sold together with some copied research, including extract pages from the respective medal rolls

Condition: GVF

Code: 18737Price:


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A former 'Dundee Jute Worker's' Batte of Loos 'Killed-in-Action' medal group of 3 together with associated Memorial Plaque, Memorial Scroll and Buckingham Palace Letter: Private William Rudd, 1st Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

- 1914 Star. No clasp (114 Pte. W. Rudd. R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (114 Pte. W. Rudd. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (114 Pte. W. Rudd. R. Highrs.)
- Memorial Plaque (William Rudd)

Sold together with;

- Original (worn) card cover case for the Memorial Plaque
- Original illuminated and named Memorial Scroll
- Original Condolence Letter on Buckingham Place Letterhead

Important: Private William Rudd is confirmed having been 'Killed-in-Action' on 26th September 1915, the 'Second Day' of Scotland's 'Bloodiest ever Battle'

Note: All three Great War medals verified as the recipeints per the respective medal rolls as under;

- 1914 Star: Ref WO 329/2460 (dated clasp issued to NOK)
- BWM & Interallied Victory medals: Ref WO 129/1351

William Rudd was born in Newcastle, Northumberland, England, circa 1886. By 1901, William (15) together with his brothers Charles (19) and Henry (18), had relocated to Dundee, Scotland, where in 1901, they were living together as a family, with their married sister Mary (21) who was married to Absolom Wallace (21), a Scottish 'Cabinet Maker', from Aberdeen. Having firmly set their roots in the industrial city of Dundee, the brothers were soon employed in the local industries. The 1901 National Census for Scotland, recording William as a 'Jute Worker', and the family then residing at 2 Middle Street, Dundee. When old enough to join the British Army, in 1904, William enlisted in his local regiment, the Black Watch, subsequently being posted to the 2nd Battalion, then serving it's overseas tour in British India. The 1911 National Census for England and Wales, confirms that William, then serving in India with 2/Black Watch, was 25 years of age, as of April 1911. The 2/Royal Highlanders, served in British India 1902-1914, during which time the battalion had the honour of providing the 'Guard of Honour' at the 'Greatest Imperial Assemblage' of all time - the Delhi Durbar of 1911 (James was not however awarded one of the Durbar medals allocated to the Black Watch). While at Delhi, the 2nd Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), received new regimental colours from the hands of King Emperor, George V

In 1904, William Rudd had joined the British Army on a Short Service Engagement, seven years with 'The Colours' and five years on the 'Army Reserve'. By the time of the outbreak of the Great War, William had already returned to civilian life, but was mobilized from the reserve in August 1914, and posted to his old regiment, The Black Watch, joining the 1st Battalion Black Watch - the first of the Black Watch battalions to land in France during the Great War - and a very early lander in theatre of war France, arriving there on 13 August 1914. The following year, William Rudd, was 'Killed-in-Action' on the second day of the battle of Loos, an action in which he distinguished himself, while making the superem sacrifice. The 'Dundee Courier' issue of 4 November 1915, contained a named portrait photograph of William Rudd, and the below article;

Quote,

PRIVATE LEADS A SECTION

A Dundee man has nobly died while taking over command of his section when the section commander had been placed out of action.

Wrting to Mr Henry G. Rudd, 92 Blackscroft, Dundee, a comrade, after referring to the death of his brother, Private William Rudd, 1st Black Watch, says :- "His Company was in reserve when they received orders to reinforce the firing line. His section commander was wounded and Private Rudd immediately took over command, but when he had reached within a few yards of the opposing trenches he was shot dead through the temple."

A reservist, Private Rudd, was 29 years of age and unmarried, had been six years in India, where he was well known as a footballer and Highland dancer. His brother Charles has since the outbreak of the war joined the H.L.I.

Unquote.

Referring to this action by 1/BW, the Regimental History, states;

Quote,

‘The morning of the 26th broke fine, and as reserves had come up during the night it was determined to renew the advance. At 10am the Battalion received orders to attack with two companies against the south edge of Hulluch. At 12 noon the attack was cancelled, since the units on the right and left were at that moment losing ground, and the Division on the right had been definitely forced to retire.

In the meantime, the two companies in the front line had gone forward; but they achieved nothing more than the capture of an advanced T-head trench. The divisions in Loos were also losing heavily in counter-attacks, and the whole of the two corps were temporarily on the defensive.’

Unquote

The body of Private Rudd was never recovered from the battlefield, but his life and the supreme sacrifice he made are commemorated in perpetuity, at the CWGC 'Loos Memorial', located at Pas de Calais, France

Sold with a group photograph of No. 1 Section, F Company, The Cameronians, Cawnpore, 1909, presumably taken, or obtained during his service in India with the Black Watch, and some other copied research including Medal Index Card

Postage: Due to the weight and special pacakging required for this lot, the postage reflects the extra cost and work involved to dispatch the lot

Condition: Medals GVF

Code: 18733Price: 495.00 GBP


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A Mesopotamia theatre 'Battle of Hanna' Great War 'Killed-in-Action' casualty campaign medal group of 3 with associated Memorial Plaque: Corporal James Dougall, 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

- 1914-15 Star (S-9194 L-Cpl. J. Dougall, R. Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-9194 Pte. J. Dougall. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-9194 Pte. J. Dougall. R. Highrs.)
- Memorial Plaque: (James Dougall)

Important: Private James Dougall 2nd Battalion Black Watch, is confirmed 'Killed-in-Action', Hanna, Iraq, on 21 January 1916

Note: All three medals confirmed as entitled per the respective medal rolls as under;

- 1914-15 Star:WO 329/2741
- British War and Interallied Victory Medals: WO 329/1352

The Memorial Plaque sold with original card cover and official enclosure from the King & Queen on Buckingham Palace letterhead

James Dougall, the son of Aeneas & Jane Dougall was a native of Auchterarder, Perthshire, Scotland, where he was born circa 1896. The 1901 National Census for Scotland, records Jamess till living in Auctherarder, where his father was employed as an 'Ironmongers Assistant', and the family comprising parents and four children resided at 73 Hight Street 'Northview', Auchterarder. Afteer the death of the father, Jane Dougall, relocated the family to the city of Edinburgh, which was the birthplace of the mother. By the time of the Great War, the family is recorded as living at, Appin Terrace, Edinburgh

James Dougall was a civilian when the Great War broke-out. He volunteered his services by enlisting in the British Army, and service with the 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). James is confirmed as first entering theatre of war 'France' on 1 October 1915. In November 1915, the 7th (Meerut) Division of the Indian Corps, in which 2/Black Watch served, was relieved from the front line of the Western Front, as a prelude for relocation to the distant Persian Gulf theatre of war, and a new enemy - the forces of the Turkish 'Ottoman Empire'

James Dougall together with the rest of 2/Black Watch disembarked at Basra, Iraq, on 31 December 1915. In Mesopotamia, 2/Black Watch, continued to serve under the higher formation, 7th (Meerut) Division, now part of 'Tigris Corps'. The Jock's, and Indians, recently arrived from Europe were thrown into the fight very quickly after their arrival in Mesopotamia. By now holding the appointment 'Acting-Corporal', James Dougall, only 19 years of age, was 'Killed- in-Action' on 21 January 1916. On this date, 2/Black Watch were serving alongside the 41st Dogras and 6th Jats as part of the 35th Brigade, for the 'First Attack' on the heavily defended Turkish position at Hanna. Referring to the opening moves of the 'Battle of Hanna', the regimental history gives the following;

‘At seven minutes past eight on the morning of the 21st, as the bombardment lifted, The Black Watch advanced at a slow double, and were at once greeted by a storm of bullets. Despite the heavy mud, despite the losses, perfect order was kept, and after a momentary halt at the irrigation channel every man rose up simultaneously and swept forward into the Turkish trench. There for a few moments the Turks met them hand to hand. Lieutenant Thorburn, who was among the first in, was bayoneted and clubbed to the ground, but recovered consciousness to hear the welcome sound of Piper Crichton playing along the captured trench.

On the right, the Dogras suffered heavily, lost all their British officers, and were unable to make good the right of the objective. But a few small parties of them and of the 6th Jats gallantly pressed forward and joined the Regiment after the trench was captured.... the flanks were exposed, and the Battalion was cut off from all support.

Immediately after the assault the Turks had fled across the open to their second line, losing heavily as they ran, for in-spite of the exertions of the assault our men fired steadily and with good effect. Before long, however, the enemy was strongly reinforced, and soon discovered how few in numbers were the British who had penetrated his position. Two main counter-attacks now developed... These attacks were checked for some time with the aid of one or two machine guns captured by the two flank companies.... But force of numbers was bound to tell in time. Many of our men fell, and step by step the remainder were forced to give ground until they were gradually squeezed into the corner of the trenches nearest to the river bank... bravery and discipline can make good lack of numbers in an assault, but it is impossible for a hundred men to hold a position indefinitely when attacked on three sides and with no supports forthcoming....

For two hours a desperate resistance was put up against hopeless odds. Sergeant Finlay died fighting with the same cool courage that had won him his V.C. on the 9th May in France. At last, about 10.15am, when almost surrounded, the remnants of the shattered platoons, half of whom were wounded, fell back on the British lines, bringing with them one officer and about a dozen Turks as prisoner....

The losses reported on the 21st were 6 officers (2 killed, 1 wounded and missing) and 175 other ranks (21 killed, 79 wounded and missing). Of those reported missing all were subsequently ascertained to have been killed, and at least one officer and many men who were wounded refused to report or go to hospital while the need of the Battalion was so great. The casualties in this action were approximately 60 per cent of the fighting strength of the Battalion. Exclusive of the transport, 29 officers and nearly 900 men had landed at Basrah three weeks earlier. There now remained to report themselves fit for duty two combatant officers and 130 men, and of these not all were un-wounded.’

The supreme sacrifice made by Lance Corporal James Dougall, is commemorated in perpetuity on a panel of the CWGC 'Basra Memorial', Iraq

Sold together with some copied research including Medal Index Card

Condition: GVF

Code: 18726Price:


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A Great War ‘Aubers Ridge V.C. action’ and Delhi Durbar casualty medal group of 4, sold together with respective Memorial Plaque: Corporal John Beattie, 2nd Battalion, Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

- 1914 Star. With a contemporary dated 'slider' clasp (822 Cpl. J. Beattie. 2/R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (822 Cpl. J. Beattie. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (822 Cpl. J. Beattie. R. Highrs.)
- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 (822 L Cpl J. Beattie R.H.)
- Memorial Plaque (John Beattie)

The Memorial Plaque with the original card envelope and enclosure letter with Buckinham Palace letterhead

Important: The recipient is recorded as having been 'Killed-in-Action' in France, on 5 May 1915, during the Battle of 'Aubers Ridge'

Note: The Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 is regimentally impressed in the correct style for awards of this medal to the 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

The Great War and Commemorative Medal verified as entitled per the official medal rolls as under;

- 1914 Star & dated clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- BWM & Victory medals: Ref WO 329/1351
- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911: Ref WO 100/400

John Beattie, the son of John & Harriet Beattie, was a native of St. Cyrus, Kincardineshire, Scotland, where he was born circa 1888. John was born into a farm workers family, and was the only son, albeit he had 5 x siblings, all sisters, viz Jessie, Maria, Cecelia, Harriet and Lizzie. Typical of farm workers in North East Scotland of this period, the family worked at several farm locations in the Kincardineshire, Angus and Forfar region in the years 1888-1915. John had already left home by the time of the 1901 Scotland Census, in which he is recorded as working as a farm servant, or 'Farm Loon', residing and working at. John enlisted in the British Army, sometime prior to 1907, and had served for six years in India prior to the outbreak of the Great War, in August 1914. During his service in British India, Johnhad the distinction of serving at the great imperial assembelage - the Delhi Durbar - held at Delhi in December 1911, and the only time a ruling British monarch visited British India - and whereat the 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders provided the Guard of Honour at the Durbar ceremonies. The 2nd Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), received new regimental colours from the King Emperor, Geirge V, at Delhi, and silver Durbar medals were issued to 'selected' all-ranks of the regiment, including an award to John Beattie (the medal roll refers).

In August 1914, John was serving at Bareilly Cantonment, India, where his battalion was a constituent unit of the mixed Bareilly Brigade, Meerut Division of the Army in India. Meerut Division was mobilized for war service and embarked from India for France on 21 September 1914, with the 2nd Royal Highlanders disembarking at Marseilles, France, on 12 October 1914.

John Beattie served during the Great War with the2/Black Watch in the French theatre of war from 12 October 1914. He was 'Killed-inAction' on, 9 May 1915. On the latter date the Battalion were engaged during the Battle of Aubers Ridge, the Regimental History gives the following:

‘The Battalion had a particularly trying part to play on May 9th, as it had to relieve in the front line, in daylight and under continuous shell fire, a unit which with heavy loss had failed to advance; and it had to renew the attack against an enemy, not only unshaken by the previous attack, but obviously reinforced and ready to meet a second attempt. But the attempt was made with a determination and courage worthy of the Regiment...

About noon the Battalion received orders to relieve the 2nd Gurkhas on the right of the Dehra Dun Brigade.... The Batttalion was formed for attack in two lines... the assault was timed for 4pm. By about 3.55pm the front lines issued from the trenches and lay down awaiting the signal to charge. Colonel Harvey remained on the right, and ordered Major Wauchope to watch and report progress on the left of our line. Large numbers of Germans could be seen issuing from communication trenches and filing along the front, unaffected by our very weak bombardment.

The attack was met by a very accurate and extremely heavy rifle and machine-gun fire from the moment it began. A wide stream full of water and mud ran across No Man’s Land (which was about 200 yards wide), on the right within a few yards of our trench, on the left rather nearer the German than the British line. Some thirty bridges were supposed to have been constructed on our front, but few were existing when the Battalion made its attack. The greater number of the casualties fell close to or into this obstacle....

In the brief period the assault lasted the losses of the Battalion were: killed, 3 officers and 69 other ranks; wounded, 5 officers and 157 other ranks; missing (practically all killed close to the German trenches) 36 other ranks; total, 270 out of 450 engaged, or 60 per cent. The wounded and unwounded lay out in the open under fire till darkness enabled them to regain the trenches.’

Victoria Cross: Lance Corporal David Findlay of the 2nd Battalion was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry during the above attack

The body of Corporal Beattie was never recovered from the battlefield, and his life and ultimate sacrifice is now commemorated on two permanents memorials, vis the CWGC 'Le Touret Memorial' located at Pas-de-Calais, France, and on the Brechin War Memorial, located in Brechin, Angus. Scotland

Prior to his death in action, John had bequeathed his 'Soldiers Effects' and money credits with the British Army, to his father John, and each of his 5 x sisters

Condition: About EF

Code: 18728Price:


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An 'Old Contmeptibles' Great War 1914 Star and confirmed Delhi Durbar Medal group of 4: Private Walter Stenning, 1st Battalion Royal Highlanders, late 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders

- 1914 Star (1114 Pte. W. Stenning. R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (1114 Pte. W. Stenning. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1114 Pte. W. Stenning. R. Highrs.)
- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911. Silver issue (1114 Pte W. Stenning RH)

Note: The Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 is regimentally impressed in the correct style for awards of this medal to the 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

Important: Private Stenning is confirmed as being 'Wounded-in-Action' prior to 21 September 1914 (Ref 'Dundee Courier' newspaper edition of 27 October, 1914

NB: All four Great War and Delhi Durbar medals verified as entitled per the official medal rolls as under;

- 1914 Star and issued a dated clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- BWM & Victory medals: Ref WO 329/1351
- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911: Ref WO 100/400

Walter Stenning, son Phillip and Caroline Stenning, was a native of the parish of St Martins, Brighton, Sussex, England, where he was born circa 1891. At the time of the next Census in 1901, Walter, described as a 'scholar' living at home with his parents and 5 x other siblings, at 13 Franklin Street, Brighton. William enlisted - underage - in the British Army, on 7 July 1904 (the SWB roll refers), at which time he was posted the the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders),and was subsequently drafted overseas to join the 2nd Battalion Black Watch, then serving in British India. The 1911 National Census for England and Wales, confirms that, as of April 1911, Walter, was 21 years of age.The 2/Royal Highlanders, served in British India 1902-1914, during which time the battalion had the honour of providing the 'Guard of Honour' at the 'Greatest Imperial Assemblage' of all time - the Delhi Durbar of 1911. Walter is confirmed as receiving one of the regimentally allocated Durbar medals. While at Delhi, the 2nd Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), received a new stand of regimental colours from the hands of King Emperor, George V. Having enlisted on a short service egagment - seven years with 'The Colours' and five with the Army Reserve - William was mobilized as a 'Reservist' on the outbreal of the Great War in August, 1914, at which time he rejoined his old regiment being posted to the 1st Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). Walter - an early lander - first entered theatre of war 'France' on 13 August 1914, and soon had the misfortune to become a very early casualty of the Great War, being 'Wounded-in-Action' sometime prior to 21 September 1914. Walter's name and service details being published in the 'Dundee Courier' newspaper edition of 27 October, 1914, which contained a list of 85 'All-Ranks' of the British Expeditionary Force, wounded in Belgium, not previously recorded as wounded, who had been evacuated back to England for recovery at the 2nd Eastern General Hospital, Brighton. As a consequence of the debilitating effects of his wounds and being found to be medically unfit for further military service, took his final discharge from the British Army on 22 April 1915, and was awarded a Silver War Badge (No 50539)

Sold together with some copied research, including Medal Index Card

A very good 'Old Sweat's' Delhi Durbar and 1914 casualty medal group

Condition: VF and better

Code: 18730Price: 425.00 GBP


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An Arbroath 'Teenager Casualty' wounded at Neuve Chapelle campaign medal group of 3 with confirmed Silver War Badge: Private James Guthrie, 'F' Company, 1/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) (Territorial Force)

- 1914 Star. No clasp (1846 Pte. J. Guthrie, 1/5 R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (1846 Pte. J. Guthrie. R. Highrs)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1846 Pte. J. Guthrie. R. Highrs)
- Silver War Badge (40051)

Sold with a related hallmarked silver 'Golfing' prize medal, from 'Arbroath High School' reverse engraved ‘A.H.S. “J. G.” 1913’

Important: Private James Guthrie, 'F Coy' 1/5 BW (TF) is confirmed as being 'Wounded-in-Action' by a bullet wound (GSW) to the right thigh, receivd on 3 March 1915, at Neuve Chapelle (his extant service papers held and accessible at the National Archives refer)

Note: All the three campaign medals and Silver War Badge verified from the respective campaign and SWB rolls as under;

- 1914 Star: Ref WO 329/2460
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/151
- Silver War Badge: Ref WO 329/3159 (badge number 40051)

James Guthrie, son of John Guthrie, was a native of, Arbroath, Scotland, where he was born circa 1897 (National Census for England & Wales refers). James volunteered for the Territorial Force, enlisting at Arbroath on, 9 February 1914, for service with his local infantry battalion, 1/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) (Territorial Force). At time of enlistment, James was only 17 years of age, and described his trade as 'Student'. After the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914, James Guthrie together with his battalion was mobilized, and having volunteered for overseas service, he embarked for France, which theatre of war he first entered on 1 November 1914. While serving in France & Flanders, James Guthrie, was a member of 'F Coy' 5th Bn Black Watch (T.F.). The Dundee Courier issue of 13 March 1915, contained a letter from Mr John Guthrie (Green Street, Arbroath), the father of Private James Guthrie, informing that that he had received a letter from James, who had been 'Wounded-n-Action' in the leg (GSW to the right thigh at 'Neuve Chapelle') and that he had been evacuated back to the United Kingdom, where he was recovering in a hospital located at Clacton-on-Sea, England. Reference 'The Scotsman' issue of ,11 March 1915, a more detailed reference to James Guthrie was cited as under;

Quote,

Mr and Mrs Rober Guthrie, Green Street, Arbroath, received a letter yesterday from their son, Private James Guthrie, of the 5th Black Watch, F Company, stating that he had been wounded, on the 3rd inst, by a bullet in the right thigh, and was now in the Middlesex Home Hospital at Clacton-on-Sea. His company had been resting for three days about nine miles from the firing line, when they were ordered to proceed to the front for trench digging. They started in carts but, left the carts and had only been walkin for five minutes when he was wounded. Private Guthrie, who says he is progressing favourably, joined the Arbroath detachment of the 5th Black Watch in April last.

Unquote.

As a consequence of his debilitating wounds, James Guthrie took his final discharge form the British Army on 2 November 1915, by which time he had served 1 year 267 days with the Territorial Force, and his conduct being descrived as having been 'Exemplary'. At time of discharge he was only 18 years of age......

Sold together with some copied research including Medal Index Card

Condition: About EF

Code: 18731Price:


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A Great War 'Killed-in-Action' campaign medal group of 3 with memorial plaque to a casualty of 'Aubers Ridge' May, 1915: Private James Robertson, 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

- 1914 Star. With original dated clasp (1338 Pte. J. Robertson. 2/R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue(1338 Pte. J. Robertson. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1338 Pte. J. Robertson. R. Highrs.)
- Memorial Plaque (James Robertson) last pierced at 12 o’clock & polished

Important: Private James Robertson is confirmed as having been 'Killed-in-Action' at Aubers Ridge, 13 May 1915

Note: All three campaign medals and dated clasp for the 1914 Star verified as issued per the respective medal rolls as under;

- 1914 Star: Ref WO 329/2460
- BWM & Victory medals: Ref WO 329/1351

James Robertson, was a native of, Perth, Scotland, where he was born circa 1888 (National Census for England & Wales refers). Basis his regimental number it is known that James enlisted for the British Army, at Dundee, Scotland, sometime in 1908, joining his local regiment, the Black Watch. The 1911 National Census for England and Wales, confirms that James - the only James Robertson, then serving in India with 2/Black Watch, was 23 years of age, as of April 1911. The 2/Royal Highlanders, served in British India 1902-1914, during which time the battalion had the honour of providing the 'Guard of Honour' at the 'Greatest Imperial Assemblage' of all time - the Delhi Durbar of 1911 (however, James was not one of the lucky few - and did not receive any of the Durbar medals allocated to the Black Watch). While at Delhi, the 2nd Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), received new regimental colours from the hands of King Emperor, George V

In August 1914, James was serving at Bareilly Cantonment, India, where his battalion was a constituent unit of the mixed 'Bareilly Brigade', Meerut Division of the Army in India. Meerut Division embarked for France on 21 September 1914, with the 2nd Royal Highlanders disembarking at Marseilles, France, on 12 October 1914. Private James Robertson, became an early Great War casualty when he was 'Killed-in-Action' at Aubers Ridge, 13 May 1915.

James Robertson, nominated that his remaining effects from the British Army were to be bequeathed to a 'friend' & sole legatee, Miss Annie Simpson Smith

Sold together with some copied research, including Medal Index Card

Note the Memorial Plaque only has been pierced and polished, as commonly found

Condition: Medals GVF

Code: 18735Price: 350.00 GBP


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A 'Killed-in-Action' casualty of the first day of the Battle of Loos, medal group of 3: Private William Dick, 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

- 1914 Star. Riband fitted with contemporary slider clasp (7917 Pte. W. Dick. R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (7917 Pte. W. Dick. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (7917 Pte. W. Dick. R. Highrs.)

Note: All 3 x medals verified as the recipient’s entitlement for the Great War, per the respective campaign medal rolls as under;

- 1914 Star: Ref WO 329/2460
- BWM & Victory medals: Ref WO 329/1352

William Dick, the son of Alexander & Isabella Dick, was a native of Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, Scotland, where he was born circa 1883. William's father was employed as a Coal Miner, and in 1891, the family comprised William’s parents and 5 children, William being the only son. William joined the British Army circa 1900, on a short-term engagement, the National Census for Scotland recording him in 1901 as resident at, Panmure Barracks, Montrose, Scotland, while serving with 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders, showing his age of 18 years. William served in the later stages of the South African War and is confirmed as earning a Queens South Africa Medal with clasps for 'Orange Free State' & 'South Africa 1902' (ref WO 100/190). On the outbreak of the Great War, William was mobilized from the Army Reserve, and re-joined his regiment. William first entered theatre of war, 'France', with his regiment on 30 August 1914, at which time he was one of a 'Draft' sent to the 1st Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), then serving in France. There is no record of William having qualified for a dated clasp to his 1914 Star, and certainly none was ever issued. William was subsequently transferred to his old battalion, 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) sometime on, or after, that battalion had disembarked at Marseilles, on 12 October 1914, as part of Bareilly Brigade, Meerut Division of the Indian Corp - the battalion having been a pre-war garrison battalion in India, since 1902. Advanced to Lance Corporal, William was subsequently reported 'Killed-in-Action', during the fateful first day of the 'Battle of Loos' on 25 September 1915 - on which date, the 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), which had started out with a battalion strength of 21 officers and 796 x other-ranks, had, by the close of the first day of battle, suffered casualties of 363 all-ranks killed, missing or wounded. In the annals of Scottish military history, the first day of the Battle of Loos, remains the bloodiest single day in terms of the total number of Scots killed or died

The body of Lance Corporal William Dick, was never recovered from the battlefield, and his supreme sacrifice is now commemorated on a memorial panel at the CWGC Loos Memorial, France. At the time of his death, William, who had married on 3 March 1905, left a widow, Jessie Dick (born 13 April 1884), and three sons, vis, Alexander (1906), William Donaldson (1912) and Robert (1913), the family residing at, 178 Mavis Valley, Bishopbriggs, Glasgow, Scotland

Sold together with some copied research, including Medal Index Card

Condition: About EF

Code: 18736Price:


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An 'An Old Contemptibles' Great War and Long Service medal group of 4: Private John. McKay, 2nd Battalion, Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

- 1914 Star. with contemporary dated clasp (970 Pte. J. McKay. 2/R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (970. Pte. J. McKay. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (970. Pte. J. McKay. R. Highrs.)
- Imperial Service Medal. GVI issue. 2nd Type (John McKay)

Important: Private John McKay is confirmed as being 'Wounded-in-Action' on, or before 3rd December 1914, while serving with the British Expeditionary Force in France & Flanders

Note: All four (4 x) medals confirmed as the recipients full medal entitlement (he never claimed or was issued a dated clasp - albeit he was entitled to one), per the respective campaign medal rolls and London Gazette as under;

- 1914 Star & contemporary dated clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- BWM & Victory medals: Ref WO 329/1351
- Imperial Service Medal: London Gazette issue of 25 May 1951

John McKay, son of Hugh and Annie McKay, was a native of Newton Stewart, Wigtownshire, Scotland, where he was born circa 1886-1889 (the only John McKay born in Newton Stewart appears in the 1891 & 1901 Census returns, living at St. Ninians Cottage, Penninghame, Wigotownshire. His father was a 'Skinner', and young John, was described as an 'Skinner's Apprentice' in 1901). On 23 August 1907, he enlisted in the British Army, and service with 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders (the Silver War Badge roll refers). The 1911 National Census for England and Wales, confirms that John was serving in India in 1911, the return recording that at the time he 'claimed' to be 22 years of age. The 2/Royal Highlanders, served in British India 1902-1914, during which time the battalion had the honour of providing the 'Guard of Honour' at the 'Greatest Imperial Assemblage' of all time - the Delhi Durbar of 1911 (John was not however awarded one of the Durbar medals allocated to the Black Watch). While at Delhi, the 2nd Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), received new regimental colours from the hands of King Emperor, George V

In August 1914, John was serving at Bareilly Cantonment, India, where his battalion was a constituent unit of the mixed 'Bareilly Brigade', Meerut Division of the Army in India. Meerut Division embarked for France on 21 September 1914, with the 2nd Royal Highlanders disembarking at Marseilles, France, on 12 October 1914. Private John Mckay, became an early casualty of the Great War, when he was 'Wounded-in-Action', sometime on, or before the 3rd December 1914, while serving with the British Expeditionary Force, his name and service details being published in the Sheffield Daily Telegraph, issue of 23 January 1915 (the same announcement being similarly published in other newspapers of the time). John McKay took his final discharge from the British Army on 25 September 1915, and was issued a 'Silver War Badge (No 583 ) for the debilitating effect of the wounds he received in 1914, while on active service, per the provisions of Para 392 (xvi) King's Regulation, the SWB being issued to the recipient on 2 October 1916

In civilian life, John was employed by the Post Office, and at retirement from the Post Office in 1951, he received the Imperial Service Medal, for his services as a Postman, in Perth, Scotland

Sold together with hard-copy of recipients Medal Index Card, and London Gazette entry page confirming award of the Imperial Service Medal

The three Great War medals suspended from original silk ribands, and mounted as-worn in the swing style. The medal mounting bar retaining the original long hinged pin and clasp fittings. The Imperial Service Medal, loose, as issued, suspended from the original mounting bar, this latter retaining the hinged pin and clasp fittings

Condition: GVF

Code: 18729Price:


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An impressive and scarce campaign and Delhi Durbar Medal group of 8: Sergeant David Lamb late 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), later Egyptian Police

- 1914 Star. With original dated clasp (1635 Cpl. D. Lamb, 2/R. Highrs)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (1635 Sjt. D. Lamb, R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1635 Sjt. D. Lamb, R. Highrs.)
- The 1939-45 Star
- The Africa Star. With original '8th Army' clasp
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911. Silver issue (1635 L Cpl D Lamb, RH)

Important: The recipient is recorded as having been thrice 'Wounded-in-Action' during the Great War

Note: The Delhi Durbar Medal 1911 is regimentally impressed in the correct style for awards of this medal to the 2nd Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

The Great War and Commemorative Medal are verified as entitled per the official medal rolls as under;

- 1914 Star and clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1351
- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911: Ref WO 100/400

David Lamb, son of Charles and Helen Lamb, was a native of Lochee, Dundee, Scotland, where he was born circa 1890. From his regimental number, David enlisted in the British Army in 1909, joining his local regiment, the Black Watch. The 1911 National Census for England and Wales, confirms that David was serving in India in 1911, with 2nd Battalion of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), which battalion served overseas in British India between 1902-1914. During his service in India, David had the distinction of serving at the great imperial assembelage - the Delhi Durbar - held at Delhi in December 1911 (the only time a ruling British monarch visited British India) and whereat the 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders provided a Guard of Honour at the Durbar ceremonies. At the Durbar 2/Black Watch received new regimental colours from the King Emperor, George V, and silver Durbar medals were issued to 'selected' all-ranks of the regiment, including an award to David Lamb (the medal roll refers)

Corporal David Lamb, 2nd Battalion Royal Highlanders, first entered the France/Flanders theatre of war on 12 October 1914. Clasp confirmed on the respective medal index card. Notes accompanying the medals, show that he was reported to have been 'Wounded-in-Action' on no less than three times during his service in France & Flanders vis; 17 November 1914, 10 December 1914 & 6 February 1915. Reference the 'Dundee Courier' edition of, 9 February 1916, therein is an article pertaining to a 'Loyal Lochee Family' - the Lamb's - that records the death of David's younger brother Private Thomas Lamb, who was Killed-in-Action serving with 2/Black Watch in the Persian Gulf. The article also mentions that Davids father, Charles Lamb resident of 1 Sinclair Street Lochee, Dundee, had three other sons serving in the forces, vis George Lamb (Royal Engineers), Frederick Lamb (Seaforth Highlanders), and Sergeant David Lamb, who by February 1916 was then stated to be serving with 1st Battalion Black Watch

David Lamb married Anna Silich (daughter of Joseph & Caroline Silich) in Cairo, Egypt, on 22 March 1919. After taking his discharge from the British Army, David, became a 'Policeman' in Egypt, where he lived and worked in the inter-war years. Shipping registers from this era record David (32) and his wife Anna (31), formerly residing at 3 Sinclair Street, Lochee, Dundee, embarking London on 23 September 1923, on board the P & O vessel 'Mongolia' bound for Port Said, Egypt, the passgener list recording that he was a Policeman whose future place of permanent residence was to be Egypt

Provenance: ex Dennis Huxstep Black Watch Collection

The medals mounted in the swing-style and presumably as-worn by the recipient. The medals suspended from contemporary silk weave ribbons and the mounting bar retaining the original long hinged pin and clasp fittings

Sold together with some research notes, and copy of Medal Index Card

A rare and impressive 'Delhi Durbar' medalists group, including Second World War service

Condition: About GVF

Code: 18727Price:

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