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A confirmed Victorian 'Camel Troopers' campaign & long service medal group to one of only 100 men who served in the 'Camel Corps' of the 72nd Highlanders during the Indian Mutiny: Private William Armstrong, 72nd Highlanders 'Camel Troop'

- Crimea Medal 1854-56. With loose clasp 'Sebastopol'. Un-named as issued
- Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-59. 'Central India' (Wm. Armstrong, 72nd Highlanders)
- Military L.S. & G.C Medal. Victorian issue (1767. Wm. Armstrong, 72nd Foot
- Turkey: Crimea Medal 1855. Sardinia rev (No.1767 William Armstrong 72 Highlanders)

The suspension claw on the LSGC re-pinned

In 1881, the 72nd Highlanders were re-styled 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders

Important: All medals enumerated in the recipients extant service papers held at The National Archives (a hard copy of the papers is sold together with the medals). The respective medal roll references are;

- Crimea Medals & clasp Sebastopol: WO 100/31
- Indian Mutiny Medal 1857-59 with clasp Central India: WO 100/38

William Armstrong was a native of the Parish of Whithorn, Wigton, Scotland, where he was born circa 1822. By trade a 'Labourer' William attested for the 72nd Highlanders at Dumfries, Scotland, on 29 July 1843, being posted to the 72nd Highlanders. A professional soldier, William subsequently served for a total of 21 years 'With the Colours'. William completed his military service in November 1864, and took his final discharge on 4 July 1865. At discharge William's character was described as 'Exemplary' the highest approbation available. Of the 21 years 301 days that William Armstrong served 'With the Colours', an incredible - and impressive - 18 years and 5 months was spent on overseas service in diverse locations of the erstwhile British Empire, including 'War Service; in the Crimea and in India, as under;

- Gibraltar: 3 years 2 months
- West Indies: 3 years 4 months
- North America (Canada): 3 years 3 months
- Malta: 5 months
- Crimea: 1 year 1 month
- East Indies (India): 7 years 2 months
- Malta: 5 months

William's first posting was in Ireland (then considered 'Home Service') and he later served abroad in a variety of places ranging from Barbados and Trinidad to Eastern Canada before another stretch at home and then war in the Crimea. During their time in the Crimea, the 72nd Highlanders lost 12 men killed-in- action or died of wounds, with another 90 men died from Cholera or other diseases

While serving in India, William was part of the detachment under Lieutenant Vesey, consisting of 100 men of the light and No.4 Companies, who had been mounted on camels, and attached to a column of Light and Irregular cavalry returned to quarters (at Mhow), having been under canvas in the Field for almost 17 months, and marched over 3000 miles

The 72nd Highlander's mounted 'Camel Troopers' were unique for a Highland Regiment during the Indian Mutiny. The unit came into existence on the 23rd of November, 1858, on which date Lieutenant-Colonel William Parke, who was in command of the 72nd, was ordered by Major-General Michel to assume command of a column of light and irregular cavalry. This little column consisted of two 9-Pounder Guns of the Bombay Artillery; 50 sabres of the 8th Hussars; 50 sabres of the Bombay (2nd) Cavalry; 50 sabres of the Maratha Horse; 125 sabres of the Gujrati Irregular Horse; and 100 of the 72nd (Duke of Albany’s Own) Highlanders mounted on camels

The column, under Brigadier Parke, was ordered to pursue, with utmost speed, the rebels under Rao Sahib and Tantia Topee. These mutineers having changed their course, having turned northwest, making for the fords of Nerbudda in the vicinity of Chicoolda

On the First of December 1858, having marched over 241 miles in nine days, the last being through dense jungle, the column surprised and cut up 3500 of the Sepoy Mutineers of Chota Udaipur (Oodeypore), this having the effect of completely dispersing the rebels; the loss to the Mutineers being considerable for this day’s work by our small column

The 'Camel Corps' was further referred to in Colonel John Sym’s regimental history 'Seaforth Highlanders' as follows; “In May of 1859, a detachment under Lieutenant Vesey, consisting of 100 men of the light and No.4 Companies, who had been mounted on camels, and attached to a column of Light and Irregular cavalry returned to quarters (at Mhow), having been under canvas in the Field for almost 17 months, and marched over 3000 miles.”

667 men of the 72nd Highlanders earned the Indian Mutiny medal, All but 10 of them received the medal with the clasp for "Central India" Approx. 7,300 medals with the "Central India" clasp were issued to British troops

Sold together with hard-copy set of service papers

A hard earned & well documented group of medals to a much travelled Highlander - and model soldier - who had the rare distinction of being a 'Camel Trooper' during the Indian Mutiny - and scarce thus

Condition: VF

Code: 19701Price:


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A late Victorian era campaign medal group of 3 for the North West Frontier of India and South African War: Corporal Robert Montgomery, 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders, late 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders

The group comprises;

A). India Service Medal 1895. Silver issue with 2 x clasps 'Punjab Frontier 1897-98' 'Tirah 1897-98' (5289 Pte. G. Montgomery 1st Bn. Gord: Hrs.)

B). Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902. Silver issue with 2 x clasps 'Defence of Ladysmith' 'Transvaal' (5289 Pte. G. Montgomery. Gordon Highrs:);

C). King's South Africa Medal 1901-02. With 2 x clasps 'South Africa 1901' 'South Africa 1902' (5289 Corpl.: G. Montgomery. Gordon Highrs:)

Note: All medals and clasps verified per the respective campaign medal rolls of 1st & 2nd Battalions Gordon Highlanders as under;

- IGS medal: Ref WO 100/89 the medal roll 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders
- QSA Medal: Ref WO 100/203 the medal roll of 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders
- KSA Medal: Ref WO 100/343 medal roll 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders

George Montgomery, son of John Montgomery (Foundry Worker) & Mary Jane Montgomery (nee Dorman) was a native of Glasgow, Scotland, where he was born on 22 February 1871. At the time of the 1891 census he was living at home with his parents residing at, 15 Old Dumbarton Rd, Bridgeton, and his occupation was described as a lace factory shuttler. George enlisted in the British Army on 2 January 1895, and was posted to the Gordon Highlanders. At time of enlistment he was just one month short of his 24th birthday, and described himself to have been employed in civilian life as a 'Weaver'. In 1901 he elected to extend his term to 12 years 'With the Colours, 10 of which he served variously overseas in India, and in South Africa

During his service with 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders in India, George would most likely have been present, in the 'Storming of the Dargai Heights' on, 20 October 1897, whereat, Piper George Findlater and Private Edward Lawson of the battalion each won the Victoria Cross for their conspicuous gallantry during the battle

George was discharged 5 days after returning home in 1907. On June 24, 1907 he married Jane Laird (nee McDermid), a 32 year old widow. At the time, his occupation was that of a general labourer and he lied once again about his age, stating he was 32. He was admitted to Chelsea, 14 Aug 1941 and a death certificate indicates he died at Stobhill Hospital in Glasgow on 26th June, 1944 of bronchial carcinoma. At the time of his death his occupation was a warehouse porter

Provenance: Ex Christies, March 1987

The reverse of the ribands individually fitted with velcro patches for display mounting

Condition: About GVF

Code: 19700Price:


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A late Victorian era campaign medal pair: Lance Corporal William Thomas Masterson, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers

- IGS 1895. 'PF' 'Tir 97-8' 'Samana 97' (4825 Pte. W. Masterson, 1st Bn. Ryl. Sco: Fus:)
- QSA Medal. 'Transvaal' 'South Africa 02' (4825 L. Corpl. W. Masterton. Rl. Scots Fus.)

Important: Both medals and all clasps verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of 1st & 2nd Battalions Royal Scots Fusiliers as under;

- IGS 1895 Medal and 3 x clasps: Ref WO 100/87
- QSA Medal and 2 clasps: Ref WO 100/180 (shown as Masterton)

William Masterson was a native of the parish of St Peter's, Woolwich, Kent, England, where he was born circa 1876. William enlisted in the British Army, at London, England, on 2 January 1895, at which time he claimed to be 18 years & 1 month of age, and described himself as a 'Barman'. At time of enlistment he expressed a desire to join the Royal Scots Fusiliers, which regiment he was posted to from 2 January 1895. William subsequently serv ed 5 years overseas in India and then South Africa, during which he saw action on the North West Frontier of India, and later in the closing stages of the South African War. During his service with the Royal Scots Fusiliers he served as under;

- Home: 02/01/1895-08/02/1897
- India: 09/02/1897-09/02/1902
- South Africa: 10/02/1902-13/12/1902
- Home: 14/02/1902-01/01/1907

William transferred to the Army Reserve on 20 December 1902, and took his discharge from the British Army on 1 July 1907, by which time he had completed his 12 years service contract, comprising 7 years with 'The Colours' & 5 years with the 'Army Reserve'

The medals mounted for display in the swing-style. The mounting bar retaining the original long hinged pin and clasp fittings on reverse

Condition: About GVF

Code: 18987Price: 460.00 GBP


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A naturalized American Citizen's multi-clasp, North West Frontier & South African War campaign and total abstinence medal group of 4: Private Robert Holland Muir, 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders

- IGS 1895. 'ROC 1895' 'PF' 'Tir 97-98' (3593 Pte. R. Muir 1st Bn. Gord: Highrs.)
- QSA Medal. 'CC' 'OFS' 'Joh' 'Bel' 'SA 1901' (3593 Pte. R. Muir, Gordon Highrs:)
- Army Temperance Association India: 5 year Abstinence Medal
- ATAI: 1 year Abstinence Medal. 'Relief of Chitral 1895' & 'Frontier 1897-8'

Note: The sidecarriage of the 'Relief of Chitral' pierced on each side for mounting the later issued clasps, as was the regimental norm. The ROC clasp now attached by rivets

Important: Of the 61 x Gordon Highlanders who received this clasp combination to the QSA Medal, only one of them - Robert Muir - held the IGS 1895 medal, making this a unique campaign clasp combination to the Gordon Highlanders

The India General Service Medal and Queen's South Africa Medal, and all 8 x campaign clasps are verified per the respective campaign medal rolls of 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, as under;

IGS Medal & 3 x clasps (ref WO 100/78 for ROC & WO 100/89 for PF/Tir)
QSA Medal & 5 x clasps (ref WO 100/203 for state & battle clasps & WO 100/203 for SA 1901

Note: The 2 x 'campaign' clasps on the Army Temperance Association Medal '1 year of Abstinence' medal are both scarce, especially the one for the Relief of Chitral. Reference 'A Guide to Military Temperance Medals' (David Harris, 2006), only 600 x 'Relief of Chitral 1895' clasps were issued to members of the ATAI who served in the Relief of Chitral (Annual ATAI Report 1896-97 refers), while 1999 x clasps ' Frontier 1897-8' were awarded in 1898, and another 29 x clasps awarded in 1899 ('On the March, October, 1899, refers)

Robert Holland Muir, son of Scottish parents John Muir (a miner) & Mary Muir (nee Holland) was born at, West Cramlington, near Blyth, Northumberland, England on 1 November 1871. By 1890, Robert, was living in, Ayr, Scotland, where in the family tradition he was employed as a 'Miner', and served as a part-time volunteer soldier in his local volunteer battalion, 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers. On 2 December 1890, at the age of 19 years, Robert attested at Ayr, for service in the British Army. Robert was subsequently posted to the regiment of choice - the Gordon Highlanders - arriving at the Regimental Depot, Castlehill Barracks, Aberdeen, on 6 December 1890. After completion of training, and a further short period of 'Home Service', Robert was posted to the 1st Battalion Gordon then serving overseas in India, where it had been posted since 1889. Robert's recorded services with the Gordon Highlanders is shown below;

- Home: 02/12/1890 - 25/02/1892 (1 year & 86 days)
- India: 26/02/1892 - 30/10/1898 (6 years & 247 days)
- Home: 31/10/1898 - 08/11/1899 (1 year & 9 days)
- South Africa: 09/11/1899 - 27/10/1901 (1 year & 352 days)
- Home: 28/10/1901 - 01/12/1902 (1 year & 35 days)

During his service in India, Robert saw considerable active service, taking part in the Chitral Expedition of 1895 including the 'Storming of the Malakand Pass' on 3 April 1895, and later fighting in the heavily contested Tirah & Punjab Frontier campaigns of 1897-98. During the latter campaigns, the Gordons won immortal fame, and two x Victoria Crosses for their gallantry for their storming of the 'Heights of Dargai'. Robert's award of a 3 x clasp India General Service Medal indicates that he most likely participated in all the aforementioned famous actions. After completion of his 'India Service' and return to the United Kingdom, where he was placed on the 'Army Reserve', Robert had only enjoyed barely a year of 'peace' before he was mobilized and called up from the Army Reserve, on 9 October 1899, and posted to his old corps to serve with the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders in the South African War. Robert returned home to the United Kingdom on Oct 28th, 1901 and served for a further year before being discharged as time expired, on 1 December 1902, by which time he had completed a total of 12 years service. After leaving the British Army, Robert married and took up residence in Auchinleck, Ayrshire, Scotland, where for a time he reverted to being a 'Coal Miner'

United States Citizen: Robert's British Army Service papers show that his father, had by 1902, migrated to the United States of America, with a contact address shown as, 214 William Street, Providence, Scranton, Pennsylvania. In 1906, Robert Muir and his Scottish wife Agnes Muir (nee Legatt) together with their daughter Mary, left Auchinleck, Ayrshire, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States, where the family settled in the state of Pennsylvania. On 14 February 1910, Robert became a naturalized American Citizen, at which time he was living at, 117 Swartz Street, Dunmore, PA. Robert Holland Muir, American and former Gordon Highlander is recorded as having died on 30 May 1942, at the time of his death he was residing at the family home located at 601 East Scott Street, Olyphant, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania

An excellent - and scarce - combination of medals and clasps to an American!

Condition: VF

Code: 19630Price:


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A unique medal group to a former Munster Fusilier, who earned a 'Best Shot of Volunteer in India' Medal: Sergeant Edward Alexander Cation, North West Railway Machine Gun Corps, late Royal Munster Fusiliers, East Surrey Regt & Agra Volunteer Rifles

- QSA Medal. 'Orange Free State' & 'S.A. 1902' (6222 Corpl. E. Cation. Rl: Muns: Fus:)
- 1914-15 Star (No. 1 Sgt. E. A. Cation, N. W. Ry. Machine Gun Corps.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (1 Sgt. E. A. Cation. M. G. Section.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1 Sgt. E. A. Cation. M. G. Section.)
- Volunteer Force LSM: GV issue (Pte. E. A. Cation 1/24th N.W.Rly Bn. I.D.F.)
- British India: Best Shot of the Volunteers Medal (officially engraved naming - see below)

Note: The BWM only with some minor official corrections

Best Shot of Volunteers: The last medal is attractively engraved on reverse '1st 2nd & 3rd Div 1912-13 Corpl E. A. Cation North Western Ry. Vol. Rifles 47 points'

Unique: The recipient Edward Cation is unique as being only the only former Royal Munster Fusilier to have earned this combination of medals and clasps

British India: Best Shot of the Volunteers Medal

Metal: Silver

Dimension: 47mm

Weight: 64g

Suspension: Claw with ornate floreate swivel scroll suspender

Obverse: Around the legend Presented By The Government of India'. In centre a soldier wearing tropical helmet lying in the prone position with rifle. Behind an Indian scene featuring a mountain, and jungle

Reverse: Circular legend 'Best Shot Of The Volunteers' with laurel wreath and scroll on top. Centre blank for engraving

Instituted in 1880, this rare medal was competed for annually amongst the various Volunteer Units of the Bengal Presidency

The medals were struck in Calcutta by the Calcutta Mint, and the annual recipient was allowed to keep the medal, which was authorised for wear on the right breast of Volunteers uniform tunic suspended from a 'Green' silk riband (Ref 'Mayo' for specific details of this rare medal)

A most substantial and impressive medal

Edward Alexander Cation, son of William Nottman Cation (born to James and Phebe Cation at Secunderabad in 1843) was born in Calcutta in 1876. Edward, was of Eurasian descent, his grandfather being No 699 Sergeant James Cation of the 4th King's Own Regiment who had married an 'Indo Briton' lady and settled in India. Edward had served in the Agra Volunteer Rifles before attesting for the East Surrey Regiment in Agra in August 1894. He transferred to the Royal Munster Fusiliers in 1898 and served with the 2nd Battalion in the South Africa during the Boer War, after which he returned to India and was posted to the Army Reserve in 1902

Cation worked as a Guard for the N.W. Railway and served as a Volunteer in the North West Railway Rifles, with which unit he was serving when he won the prestigious 'Best Shot of Volunteers in India Medal' that he contested in the year 1912-1913

Edward's employer, The North West Railway ran the important Khyber Pass and North West Frontier route, carrying troops and supplies along the Frontier at times of unrest.

During the Great War, Edward served overseas in East Africa with the Machine Gun Section of the North West Railway Volunteer Rifles, holding the unique regimental No 1, indicating that he was the very first 'soldier - and most senior Non Commissioned Officer - to serve with the N.W. Ry. M.G.C. The Machine Gunners of the North West Railway M.G.C. were the only unit of that volunteer railway corps to serve overseas outside of India during the Great War. The unit served in East Africa where it saw extensive service in the military operations in German East Africa, i.e., Tanganyika . The unit remained in theatre until 1917, in which year Indian forces were withdrawn from East Africa

Edward Cation is recorded as having died at Lahore, Punjab, India on 12 February 1944 - and was buried there the very same day at the Christian Cemetery of the St Andrew's. Church. At the time of his death he was 66 years of age, and described as a 'Retired Guard N.W.R.'

Sold together with various hard copy research inc service papers and extracts from QSA medal roll

The reverse of medal ribands with some soiling having been previously mounted for display

A unique and impressive medal group, the recipient Edward Cation being the only former Royal Munster Fusilier to have earned this particular combination of medals and clasps

Claw loose on Best Shot medal

Condition: Mostly about GVF

Code: 19699Price: 1125.00 GBP


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A 'Lochee Dundonian's' South African War campaign medal pair: Private James Smith, 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders

- QSA: 'Cape Colony' 'Orange Free State' 'Belfast (2523 Pte. J. Smith, Gordon Highrs:)
- KSA 1901-02. 'South Africa 01' 'South Africa 02' (2523 Pte. J. Smith. Gordon Highrs:)

Important: Both medals and all 5 x clasps verified per the respective medal rolls of the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, as under;

- QSA Medal & 5 x clasps (ref WO 100/203)
- KSA Medal & 3 x clasps (ref WO 100/343)

Important: Both medals and all 5 x clasps verified per the respective medal rolls of the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, as under;

James Smith, son of Alexander Smith (who later as the nominated next of kin was residing at, 55 Union Place, Lochee, Dundee) was a native of the Parish of Liff & Benvie, Dundee, Forfar, Scotland, where he was born circa July 1868. Prior to Joining the British Army, he was employed as a Labourer. James enlisted in the British Army at, Dundee, Scotland, on 1 April 1887, and on the same day was posted to the Gordon Highlanders. Prior to joining the regular army, James had been serving as a volunteer with his local infantry volunteer battalion, viz 3rd Forfar Rifles Volunteers. By the time he took his final discharge on 31 March 1903, he had accumulated a total of 16 years service both 'With the Colours' & on the Army Reserve', including 2 years & 35 days 'War Service' during the South African War, between ,7 June 1900 to 11 July 1902. During his service, James passed a class of instruction in 'Mounted Infantry' (23 September 1891) and obtained a 4th Class Certificate of Education

Sold together with hard copy of pages from the respective medal rolls

Medals previously framed, the reverse of medal riband with 'velcro' patches for mounting

Condition: Toned VF

Code: 19698Price:


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A 'Beckenham / Bromley, Kent, Metropolitan Police Royal Commemorative medal pair: Constable Arthur Royston, 'P' (Camberwell) Division, Metropolitan Police

- Coronation Medal 1902: Metropolitan Police reverse (P.C. A. Royston, 'P' Division.)
- Coronation Medal 1911: Metropolitan Police reverse (P.C. A. Royston, 'P' Division.)

Arthur Royston, son of William Royston & Annie Royston (nee Harradine), was a native of, Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, where he was born on, 7 December 1876. Prior to joining the Metropolitan Police, on 21 November 1898, Arthur had been employed as a 'General Labourer'. On joining the Metropolitan Police, Arthur was given 'Warrant 84618' and was described as being 5 feet 9 inches tall, with fresh complexion with brown hair and hazel eyes. Arthur was destined to serve his entire police career in the Beckenham, Bromley, Kent, area of London. In 1901 he is recorded in the National Census for England & Wales, as residing at the Police Station, located at 14 High Street, Beckenham, Bromley, Kent - at the time he was one of 10 x Police Constables residing in quarters at the Police Station. By 1911, Arthur - still a serving Police Constable - was now a married man, having wed, Florence Knight, at Beckenham Parish Church on, 1 July 1905, the couple subsequently being blessed with a daughter, Vera, who was born circa 1907. Arthur and his family were living together at, 29 Bromley Crescent, Shortlands, Bromley, Kent, in 1911 - and in 1939, they were still living at the same address. Constable Arthur Royson resigned from the Metropolitan Police on 26 November 1923, by which time he had completed 25 years service, and was then 46 years of age. His police pension effective from 26 November 1926, was to be, 153 Pounds 13 Shillings & 5 Pence per-annum. 'Retired Police Constable' Arthur Royson, is recorded as having died at Bromley, Kent, sometime, during the last quarter of 1959

Medals mounted as-worn by the recipient in the swing style, the medals suspended from their original silk ribands from a brass/gilt mounting bar. The mounting bar retaining the long hinged pin and clasp fittings

Condition: GVF

Code: 19697Price: 85.00 GBP


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A 'Battle of the Somme' casualty group of 3 to a 'Lostock' Jock, 'Wounded-in-Action', who served with the only battalion of Gordon Highlanders to fight on 'Day 1' of the Somme: Corporal James Morris, 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders

- 1914-15 Star (S-10160 Pte. J. Morris, Gord. Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-10160 Cpl. J. Morris. Gordons.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-10160 Cpl. J. Morris. Gordons.)

Sold together with;

- Quantity of original ephemera all pertaining to Corporal Morris
- Cigarette case. Lid engraved on 2 x lines 'James Morris Gordon Highlanders'

Imp: Corporal Morris was 'Wounded-in-Action' on the Somme - almost certainly Day 1 of Battle of the Somme - by 'Gun Shot & Shrapnel Wound' (GSW) to 'Chest', & hospitalized before 10 July, Rouen, France. Discharged 17 March 1917

Note: The only battalion of the Gordon Highlanders to fight on the 'First Day' of the Battle of the Somme, was the 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders

At the commencement of 'Day 1' of the Battle of the Somme the regimental war diary of 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders records that the strength of the battalion was 807 x 'All-Ranks' ( 24 x Officers & 783 x Other Ranks) prior to going into the battle, and that by the end of 'Day 1', the battalion had sustained the below following casualties during their attack on the village of Mametz;

- Officers (7 x Killed or subsequently Died of Wounds & 9 x Wounded)
- Other Ranks (119 x Killed, 287 x Wounded & 39 x Missing)

The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Gordon Highlanders, as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2801
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1655

James Morris son of Robert Morris (Coal Miner, Hewer) and Annie Morris, was a native of Lostock, near Bolton, Lancashire, England, where he was born on 6 December 1891. Prior to the Great War, James was employed as a 'Warehouseman', and in 1915 he was described as; measuring 5 feet 7 inches; brown eyes; black hair with a dark complexion. James enlisted in the British Army, at Westhoughton, Lancashire, on 22 May 1915, and was posted to the Gordon Highlanders, with which regiment he subsequently served with the 2nd Battalion. James first entered theatre of war, 'France', on 25 October 1915. Promoted to Corporal, James was 'Wounded-in-Action' in July 1916 at the Battle of the Somme - and almost certainly on 1st Day of the Somme - when he suffered 'Gunshot & Shrapnel Wounds' to the 'Chest' - the wounds he received were both severe and life threatening, as while he was initially recovering at the General Hospital, Rouen, France, his next of kin were sent a letter (from The Soldiers & Sailors Families Association, dated 10 July 1916) to advise the parents that on presentation to the War Office the authorities at Whitehall would furnish a permit to allow a visit to their son. Corporal Morris was eventually transferred to the United Kingdom to complete his recovery from his wounds received, at which time he was a patient at, Newport Section, 3rd Western General Hospital, from where he was discharged on 24 February 1917. On discharge from hospital his home address was given as; 208 Manchester Road, Westhoughton near Bolton, Lancashire. Corporal Morris was discharged from the British Army on 17 March 1917, being no longer physically fit for war service. In total Corporal Morris - who had voluntarily enlisted in the British Army - had served a total of 1 year and 300 days 'With the Colours'. At the time of taking his discharge from the British Army his character was described as being 'A sober and very well conducted man'. The degree of his disability due to the wounds received was assessed at being '50% for life' for pension claim purposes. By the time of the 1939 National Register for England & Wales, James is recorded as married and living with his wife Ethel Morris at, 13 Sunny Garth, Westhoughton, Lancashire, England, his employment being described as a 'Clerk' with a 'Cotton Manufacturer'

Note: The original ephemera includes, but is not restricted to;

- Letter from Soldiers & Sailors Families Association dated 10 July 1916, pertaining to visit pass for General Hospital, Rouen, France

- Discharge notice from Newport Section, 3rd Western General Hospital, dated, 24 February 1917

- Army Form B.2079 (parchment)

- Army Form B.2067 (parchment)

- Ministry of Pensions notification of award dated 19 January 1923

- Ministry of Pensions notification of revision of award dated February 1946

The medals mounted in the swing-style, and as worn by the recipient. The reverse of the medal mounting retaining the original hinged pin and clip fittings

A very good 'Battle of the Somme' documented Great War casualty group, to a Lancashire 'Jock', who though severely wounded in action was fortunate to survive

Condition: Medals VF

Code: 19696Price:


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An early 1916 casualty group of 3 to the 5th City Pals Battalion Manchester Regiment: Private James Wilkinson 20th (Service) Battalion (5th City) Manchester Regiment

- 1914-15 Star (18066 Pte. J. Wilkinson. Manch: R.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (18066 Pte. J. Wilkinson. Manch. R.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (18066 Pte. J. Wilkinson. Manch. R.)

Important: Private James Wilkinson is confirmed as 'Died of Wounds', France, on 29 March 1916

The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the 20th (Service) Battalion (5th City Pals) Manchester Regiment as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2801
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/2780

Reference 'Commonwealth War Graves Commission', the source shows that the recipient was the son of Mrs M.J. Wilkinson who resided at, 439, Ashton Old Rd., Openshaw, Manchester

See the Manchester Evening News issue of 7 April 1916, for report on the recipients death in action, together with a named portrait photograph of James Wilkinson in uniform

The medals have all been fitted with approximately 6 x inch lengths of new medal ribbon

Condition: GVF

Code: 19704Price:


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A 'World Wars' multi-service campaign medal group including service as an Infantryman & Merchant Seaman: Private Donovan Jack Clarke, 7th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, late Royal Engineers, Merchant Navy & later Warder, Air Ministry Wardens (Royal Air F

- 1914-15 Star (S-9197 Pte D. J. Clarke. Sea. Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-9197 Pte D. J. Clarke. Sea. Highrs)
- Mercantile Marine War Service Medal (Donovan J. Clarke.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-9197 Pte D. J. Clarke. Sea. Highrs.)
- Mercantile Marine War Service Medal (Donovan J. Clarke.)
- Defence Medal

Imp: The Great War medals all verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Seaforth Highlanders, and Medal Index Card of Merchant Seaman 1914-1918, as under;

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2801
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1655
- Mercantile Marine War Service Medal: BT 351/1/25084

Donovan 'Jack' Clarke, son of Arthur James Clarke (variously Coachman & Servant) and Edith Clarke (nee Baines) was a native of, Fingringhoe, Essex, England, where he was born on, 1 April 1895. At the time of the 1911 Census for England & Wales, 'Jack' was employed as a Merchants Clerk, and was residing with his parents (both described as being Servants) in the residence of Ernest J Moy ( a Merchant), located at, 89 Maldon Road, Colchester, Essex. During the Great War War 'Jack' served firstly in the Merchant Navy, and later the British Army, with the kilted 7th (Service) Seaforth Highlanders, in which regiment he held the regimental number S/9197. 'Jack' entered entered theatre of war 'France' on 15 October 1915, at which time he was a 'Jock' in a draft sent to France as reinforcements for the 7th (Service) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, which unit had suffered terrible losses during the Battle of Loos (fought from 25 September, 1915). It is not known when 'Jack', transferred to the Royal Engineers, but it was likely much later in the war, or even sometime after the armistice, as his allocated 'Army Number' recorded on his Medal Index Card is in the unique block allocated to those actually then serving in the Royal Engineers, or like 'Jack' were by then serving on the 'Reserve' (Jack had been placed on the 'Class Z Reserve' on 15 April 1919). Jack (39) married Freda Lovejoy White (29) at St Mary Magdalene Church, Frinton, Essex, on 21 April 1934. By April 1939, Jack and his wife are recorded in the National Register for England & Wales, as residing at,'Badenock', Halstead Road, Kirby Cross, Frinton-on-Sea (near Clacton), Essex, at which time 'Jack' was described as a Warder, employed with the Air Ministry Wardens (R.A.F. Police.). Donovan Jack Clarke (widower) died at his residence located at, 50 Halstead Road, Kirby Cross, Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, England, on 21 December 1983

The medals all mounted in the swing-style and as-worn by the recipient, suspended from frayed silk ribands. The mounting bar retaining the original long hinged pin and clasp fittings. The group attached to a felt backed board for display

A very scarce regimental combination of otherwise common medals to a 'Seaforth Highlander' & British Patriot who served his nation in both World Ward

Condition: About GVF

Code: 19733Price:

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