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A 1914 'Casualty' Mons Star campaign and long service medal group of 4: Private John Hardie, 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, later Postman, Edinburgh Post Office

- 1914 Star. With clasp & Silver Rosette (10739 Pte. J. Hardie. 1/Gord: Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (10739 Pte. J. Hardie. Gordons.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (10739 Pte. J. Hardie. Gordons.)
- Imperial Service Medal. EIIR first issue (John Hardie)

Important: Private John Hardie is confirmed 'Wounded-in-Action' in France, in October 1914, and discharged as a consequence of being found no longer fit for military service

Note: All medals and clasps confirmed as entitled & issued per respective campaign medal rolls of the Gordon Highlanders, and the London Gazette as under;

- 1914 Star. With clasp & Rosette (ref WO 329/2475)
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals (ref WO 329/1655)
- Imperial Service Medal: Published in London Gazette issue of 17 December 1954 (Postman, Edinburgh)

John Hardie, the son of William and Jessie Hardie, was a native of Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, where he was born circa 1891. John is confirmed as having enlisted in the British Army on 29 May 1908, at the age of 18 years. Prior to enlisting he is recorded to have been employed variously in the trades of 'Plumber / Carpenter'. The National Census for England & Wales records that in 1911, John Hardie was serving as a Private 1st Battalion Gordon Highlander, and was stationed at Colchester, England. Private Hardie first entered theatre of war 'France' when he landed with his battalion at Le Havre on 28 August 1914 (the recipients Medal Index Card held at The National Archives refers), and was quickly deployed for front-line action. John was an early battle casualty of the 1914 campaign, the 'Glasgow Herald, The Scotsman and The Press and Journal, daily newspapers all reporting in their issues of 6 November 1914, that he had been recently 'Wounded-in-Action' in France. His 'Wounds' would have been incurred in October 1914, as The Daily Record, issue of 5 November 1914, has the additional information that Private Hardie had arrived as a patient at Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow, on 4 November 1914. John Hardie took his final discharge from the British Army on 31 May 1915. After leaving the Army he resided for a time at '12 Inglis Road, Invergordon, Ross-shire, Scotland', where he was recorded as living on 3 October 1938, and latterly was resident in Edinburgh, where he retired from the Post Office in 1954

Condition: GVF

Code: 18079Price:


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An 'Old-Sweats' 1914 Prisoner-of-War campaign and long service medal group of 7: Regimental Quarter Master Sergeant John McDougall, Royal Scots Fusiliers, late Leinster Regiment

- 1914 Star ((8324 Sjt. J. McDougall. Leins: R.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (8324 Sjt. J. McDougall. Leins. R.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (8324 Sjt. J. McDougall. Leins. R.)
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- Military LS&GC Medal. GV type II (7177165 C. Sjt. J. McDougall. R.S. Fus.)

Sold together with original ephemera including;

- Regular Army Certificate of Service (Red Book)
- Soldiers Release Book
- Several copied photographs
- Testimonial letters

Important: Sergeant John McDougall s confirmed 'Prisoner-of-War' (captured France & Flanders) 19 October 1914 - 17 November 1918

Note: All medals confirmed as entitled & issued per respective campaign medal rolls of the Leinster Regiment and Certificate of Service as under;

- 1914 Star (ref WO 329/2535)
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals (ref WO 329/90)
- Defence & War Medals: Reference 'Certificate of Service'
- Military LS&GC Medal:

John McDougall was a native of Shettleston near Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, where he was born on 1 February 1887. John's early life appears to have been a particularly hard one, as the 1891 National Census for Scotland records him at the age of 4 years living in the home of his Grandfather, who was then a 57 year old un-employed 'Coal Miner', the household having three other young women resident who were the children of his Grandfather. By the time of the Scottish Census for 1901, John, was then resident at the Smyllum Orphanage, Lanarkshire - an institution run by Catholic Nuns, which sadly was exposed in later years as a place with a notorious reputation. John enlisted in the British Army at Glasgow, Scotland, on 7 June 1907, and was posted to the Leinster Regiment. John subsequently served in India from January 1908 to November 1911, during which time he was promoted to the rank of Corporal. In 1914, and by now a Sergeant, John first entered theatre of war 'France', when he landed with his battalion on 8 September 1914. During the 'Mons Campaign' of 1914 in France and Flanders, Sergeant McDougall, was captured by the enemy and became a Prisoner-of- War, on 18 October 1914 - remaining in captivity until 17 November 1918.

Upon the creation of the Irish Free State and the disbandment of the Southern Irish regiments of the British Army in 1922, John McDougall transferred to the Royal Scots Fusiliers, with which regiment he again served overseas in India from March 1923 to April 1930. He was discharged at Edinburgh, Scotland, holding the appointment of Colour Sergeant (C.Q.M.S.) on 6 June 1930. Retirement from the military however was destined not to be permanent, as after the outbreak of war in 1939, John re-enlisted into his old regiment at Stirling on 10 July 1940. He was finally discharged form the British Army, when he was released holding the appointment pf Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant at Annan, Scotland, on 18 June 1946

The medals mounted as-worn by the recipient in the swing-style, suspended from silk ribands. The reverse of the mounting bar retaining the long hinged pin and clasp fittings

Condition: VF

Code: 18078Price: 695.00 GBP


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A senior ranking Askari NCO's Great War campaign medal trio: 2117 Colour Sergeant Haganas Abdul, 3rd (East Africa) Battalion The King's African Rifles

- 1914-15 Star (2117 C/Sgt. Haganas. 3/K.A.R.)
- Brtitish War Medal. Silver issue (2117. C/Sgt. Haganas Abdul. 3/K.A.R.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (2117. C/Sgt. Haganas Abdul. 3/K.A.R.)

Important: All 3 x medals confirmed as entitled per respective Great War campaign medal rolls (Reference WO 329/2366) held at The National Archives. The medal rolls with remark that the medals were issued to the recipient at Nairobi, Kenya Colony, on 9 June 1923

Note: A study of the above referenced Great War medal roll for 3/KAR indicate that only an estimated 182 x 1914-15 Stars were issued to 'Other Ranks' of 3rd (East Africa) Battalion The King's Africa Rifles

During the Great War 3rd (East Africa) Battalion The King's African Rifles served in East Africa in the long running campaign against the German Colonial forces led by the famous enemy commander Paul Erich von Lettow-Vorbeck

KAR casualties in the First World War have been estimated to have been 5,117 killed and wounded with another 3,039 dying from various diseases

Condition: GF

Code: 17891Price: 200.00 GBP


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A Gallipoli 'Killed-in-Action' medal group of 3 to a 'Dub's' killed at 'Gully Ravine': 17461 Private James Unsworth 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers

- 1914-15 Star (17461 Pte. J. E. Unsworth, R: Dub. Fus.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (17461 Pte. J. E. Unsworth, R: Dub. Fus.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (17461 Pte. J. E. Unsworth, R: Dub. Fus.)

Important: Reference 'Soldiers Died in the Great War' Private James Edward Unsworth is confirmed as being 'Killed-in-Action' at Gallipoli, on 29 June 1915

The battle of 'Gully Ravine' was - after the epic and now iconic, landing from the 'S.S. River Clyde's at 'V Beach' on 25 April 1915 - the second most bloody battle fought by the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers during the ill-fated
Gallipoli campaign. At the battle of 'Gully Ravine', on just two days between, 28-29 June 1915, the 'Dublin's again incurred enormous casualties, losing an estimated 236 x officers and men killed, wounded and missing

Note: All 3 x medals confirmed as entitled & issued per respective campaign medal rolls of the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers as under;

- 1914-15 Star (ref WO 329/2818)
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals (ref WO 329/1710)

James Unsworth, the son of John & Margaret Unsworth, of Wingate, Co Durham, England, was a native of Wheatley Hill, Co Durham, where he was born circa 1874. He had enlisted for the British Army at Deaff Hill, Co Durham. A married man, James left behind his wife, Elizabeth Ann Unsworth, who as his nominated next of kin who resided at 28 Mill Bank Terrace, Station Town, Wingate, Co Durham

A captioned photograph of James Unsworth wearing the uniform and insignia of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was published in the 'Illustrated Chronicle' issue of 17 September 1915

Condition: GVF

Code: 18072Price:


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A Great War 'Salonika' theatre 'Died-of-Wounds' casualty medal group of 3: 7/2516 Private William James Carpenter, 7th Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers

- 1914-15 Star (2516 Pte. W.J. Carpenter, Ry: Muns. Fus:)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (2516 Pte. W.J. Carpenter, Ry: Muns. Fus:)
- Interallied Victory Medal (2516 Pte. W.J. Carpenter, Ry: Muns. Fus:)

Important: Reference 'Soldiers Died in the Great War' Private William James Carpenter is confirmed as having 'Died-of-Wounds' in Salonika, 20 October 1916

Note: All 3 x medals confirmed as entitled & issued per respective campaign medal rolls of the Royal Munster Fusiliers as under;

- 1914-15 Star (ref WO 329/2816)
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals (ref WO 329/90)

William James Carpenter, the son of Henry John Carpenter & Alice Carpenter (in 1916 the latter was William's nominated next of kin, residing at 218 Guinness Buildings, Draycott Avenue, Chelsea, London ), was a native of Knightsbridge, London, England, where he was born sometime circa 1896. The 1911 National Census for England & Wales records, William, as then working as a 'Reading Boy', and living at home with his widowed mother and younger sister Ada. William had other siblings, but they were no longer living with the mother in 1911. Private William James Carpenter, first entered theatre of war 'Gallipoli' on 7 August 1915, and together with the rest of his battalion landed at 'Suvla Bay' as part of the seriously depleted 10th (Irish) Division. On landing the 7th Munsters numbered 28 x officers and 750 x other-ranks, with their objective to capture the Kiretch Tepe Sirk ridge along the North side of the bay. The British failed to capture their objectives at Suvla Bay, and by the time 7/Munsters and the rest of 10th (Irish) Division were withdrawn on 30 August 1915, they numbered only 6 x officers and 305 x other ranks. 10th (Irish) Division including the 7th Munsters, were subsequently deployed to Salonika, for service in the Macedonia Campaign, during which, William Carpenter, 'Died-of Wounds' on 20 October 1916. At the time of his death William was 20 years of age

The body of William James Carpenter, was laid to rest amongst his fallen comrades, at Salonika (Lembet Road) Military Cemetery, Thessaloniki City, Greece, where his his sacrifice is commemorated in posterity by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Condition: GVF

Code: 18073Price:


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A 'Jock's' Great War 'Killed-in-Action' casualty medal group of 3: S/17970 (late 4220) Private William Campbell, 5th Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, late 1st & 2nd Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders

- 1914-15 Star (S-17970 Pte. W. Campbell, Cam: Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-17970 Pte. W. Campbell. Camerons)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-17970 Pte. W. Campbell. Camerons)

Important: Reference 'Soldiers Died in the Great War' Private William Campbell, 5th Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders is confirmed 'Killed-in-Action' in France, on 18 July 1916

Note: All 3 x medals confirmed as entitled & issued per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders as under;

- 1914-15 Star (ref WO 329/2803)
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals (ref WO 329/1666)

William Campbell, the son of Mrs Margaret Campbell (who was William's sole 'Next of Kin' in July, 1916, and residing at 19 Monteith Street, Bridgeton, Glasgow), was a native of the Parish of Barony, Glasgow, Scotland, where he had been born circa 1880. He was 35 years and 3 months of age, when he volunteered for 'Re-enlistment' into the British Army at Glasgow, Scotland, on 26 April 1915, at which time his engagement terms were '3 Years service or duration of War'. Later, on the same day he had re-listed, he was posted to the regimental depot of the Cameron Highlanders. Prior to re-enlisting, William had been working as an 'Iron Worker', and residing at 255 Dalmarnock Road, Glasgow. At time of re-enlistment he cited 16 years prior service with the Cameron Highlanders (previously he held the regimental number 4220, and had served with 1/Camerons during the South African War, receiving a Queens South Africa Medal with 3 x 'State' clasps, & Kings South Africa Medal with both dated clasps, and had completed his earlier engagement with the British Army on 7 February 1914, when he had been discharged from the Army Reserve). After reporting to the Regimental Depot of the Cameron Highlanders (located at Inverness), on 1 May 1915, he was posted to 3rd Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders. William was subsequently posted to 2nd Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders on the same day he embarked for overseas service, and entered theatre of war France' on 28 July 1915. His 'Burnt Service Papers' (held at The National Archives), show that he was posted to 1st Camerons, on 13 October 1915 and on 27 February 1916 was returned to the United Kingdom (he has incurred a serious injury while 'In the Trenches' when he had suffered a fractured rib) and remained attached to the 'Depot' through to 5 April 1916 when he was posted to 3/Camerons. William was posted to 5th Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders on 6 June 1916, on which date he again entered theatre of war 'France'. Less than 6 weeks after his return to France, William had been posted 'Wounded-in-Action' on 18 July 1916 - and the very same day the entry being changed to 'Wounded presumed dead'. Evidently, William had been sighted 'Wounded & fallen' on 18 July 1916, but as his body was never subsequently recovered, it was accepted - with good reason - that William Campbell had made the supreme sacrifice having been 'Killed-in-Action' during the battle of the Somme

As William's body was never recovered or identified from the battlefields of the Somme, it is most likely that William had been seen falling before, or at, the enemy trenches attacked by 5/Camerons on 18 July 1916. The Scottish papers reported the casualty status in the long lists generated by the War Office, including;

- Aberdeen Press and Journal issue of 29 August 1916 'Reported wounded'
- The Scotsman issue of 19 September 1916 'Previously reported wounded, now reported wounded & missing'

The sacrifice made by William Campbell is commemorated in posterity on a panel on the Thiepval Memorial - the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme. Bernard's name and service details are just one of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and who have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial

Condition: GVF

Code: 18077Price: 245.00 GBP


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A 'Teenagers' Battle of the Somme - Contalmaison - 'Killed-in-Action' campaign medal pair & memorial plaque group: S-21107 Private Bernard Kendall, 7th Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders

- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-21107 Pte B. Kendall. Camerons.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-21107 Pte B. Kendall. Camerons.)
- Memorial Plaque (Bernard Kendall)

Important: Reference 'Soldiers Died in the Great War' Private Bernard Kendall is confirmed as 'Killed-in-Action' on 17 August 1916. At the time of his death he was only 18 years of age.

Note: Both campaign medals verified as the recipients complete entitlement per the respective medal roll of the Cameron Highlanders (ref WO 329/1666) and medal index card

Reference 'The Burnley News' issue of 2 September 1916, contained the following notice under a column titled the 'Colne Roll Of Honour';

Quote.

Mr. and Mrs. Kendall, 14 John Street, Colne, have been informed by an officer of the death in action on August 17th, of their son, Pte. Bernard Kendall, of the Cameron Highlanders, who is stated to have been shot through the body. He enlisted in October 1915.

Unquote.

Bernard Kendall, the son of John and Selina Kendall, was a native of Colne, Lancashire, England, where we was born sometime during the last quarter of 1897. The 1911 National Census for England & Wales records Bernard as then being 14 years of age, and employed as an Iron Foundry Moulder. At the time of the census he was living at the family home located at 44 Bolton Street, Colne, where he lived with his parents and 5 x other siblings

Reference 'The History of the 7th Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders (Sandilands & Macleod, 1922)', it is estimated that the battalion suffered a total of 241 x casualties 'All-Ranks', killed, missing and wounded, during the action of 17 August 1916, where 7/Camerons attacked the German 'Switch Line' in front of Contalmaison

In spite of the specific circumstances of death conveyed to the recipients parents, the body of Bernard Kendall was never recovered or identified from the Somme battlefields, suggesting that Bernard was seen being shot during the attack against the enemy, and his body never recovered. However, his sacrifice is commemorated in posterity on a panel on the Thiepval Memorial - the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme. Bernard's name and service details are just one of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and who have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial also serves as an Anglo-French Battle Memorial in recognition of the joint nature of the 1916 offensive and a small cemetery containing equal numbers of Commonwealth and French graves lies at the foot of the memorial

Condition: About EF

Code: 18070Price:


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A Great War casualty campaign medal pair & memorial plaque group to a 'Jock' who was 'Killed-in-Action' only 33 days after landing in France': 32134 Private Isaac Robertson, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers, late 6/7th Bn Royal Scots Fusiliers

- British War Medal. Silver issue (32134 Pte. I. Robertson. R.S.F.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (32134 Pte. I. Robertson. R.S.F.)
- Memorial Plaque (Isaac Robertson)

Important: Reference 'Soldiers Died in the Great War' Private Isaac Robertson, is confirmed 'Killed-in-Action' on 10 June 1917. At the time of his death he was only 19 years of age.

Note: Both campaign medals verified as the recipient’s complete entitlement per the respective medal roll of the Royal Scots Fusiliers (ref WO 329/993) and medal index card

Isaac Robertson, the son of Grace Watson & the step-son of Alexander Watson, was a native of Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, where we was born, circa 1898. The 1901 National Census for Scotland records Isaac (as Isaac Watson), residing with his family at Inglis Street, Glasgow, Scotland, where his stepfather is shown employed as a 'Pottery Crater', his mother Grace was 30 years of age, and his siblings Bessie (Elizabeth) and Alexander are shown as aged 5 years. By the time of the Great War, Isaac Robertson is recorded on his service papers (held & accessible at The National Archives) as being an 'Apprentice Kinetic', residing with his family at 48 Wilkie Street, Dennistoun, Glasgow, with his mother Mrs Grace Watson nominated as his Next-of-Kin. In 1916, his family is listed as comprising his mother Mrs Grace Watson, his elder sister Elizabeth (Bessie) Robertson, and his 2 younger half-sisters, Jessie & Agnes Watson. Isaac Robertson was 'conscripted' into the British Army at Glasgow on 2 March 1916 for 'The Duration of the War', but was only called-up and 'enlisted' at Glasgow on 14 February 1917, at which time he was posted to the Royal Scots Fusiliers (his medal roll entry records show’s he served with 6/7 R.S.F., prior to being posted to 1st Battalion R.S.F.), and stated his age to be 19 years 4 months. Less than 3 months after enlisting, Isaac first entered theatre of war 'France' on 8 May June 1916, sadly only 33 days later he paid the supreme sacrifice when he was 'Killed-in-Action' on the Western Front.

The body of Isaac Robertson was never recovered from the battlefield. However, his sacrifice is commemorated in posterity on a panel on the 'Arras Memorial', Arras, Nord Pas -de-Palais, France - Memorial to the 'Missing of Arras'. maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Isaac's name and service details are just one of 34,785 officers and men of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth Forces who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, and who have no known grave.

Condition: About EF

Code: 18069Price:


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A Great War & Third Afghan War campaign and long service medal group of 3: Private Alexander Miller, 1st Garrison Battalion Gordon Highlanders, late Cameron Highlanders. Latterly Dumbarton Post Office

- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-16101 Pte A. Miller. Gordons.)
- IGS 1908 Medal. GV 'Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919' (S-16101 Pte A. Miller, Gordons.)
- Imperial Service Medal. EIIR first issue (Alexander Miller)

Important: All medals confirmed as entitled & issued as the recipients full medal entitlement per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Gordon Highlanders, and the London Gazette as under;

- British War Medal (ref WO 329/2475)
- India General Service Medal 1908 & clasp (ref WO 329/1655)
- Imperial Service Medal: Published in London Gazette issue of 5 March 1943

Alexander Miller, served in the Queens Own Cameron Highlanders (No 22866) prior to being transferred to the 1st (Garrison Battalion) Gordon Highlanders, which latter unit was raised at Blairgowrie, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1916, specifically for overseas service. 1st (Garrison Battalion) Gordon Highlanders embarked for India in January 1917, where the unit was posted to serve under higher formation 2nd Rawalpindi Division. Alexander Miller subsequently served in India during the Great War, and was still serving with the same battalion and regiment when he took part in the Third Afghanistan War 1919. Alexander was discharged to Class 'Z' Army Reserve on on 25 January 1920. On discharge Alexander returned to civil employment with the Post Office, and is recorded as receiving the Imperial Service Medal in 1943, on his retirement form the Post Office where he had been employed as a Postman in Dumbarton, Scotland

Note: Reference 'Soldiers Died in the Great War', an estimated 40 x men of the 1st Garrrison Battalion Gordon Highlanders, died on overseas service in India. Shortly after the conclusion of the Third Afghan War a brass memorial tablet was installed at St Pauls, Church of Scotland, Rawalpindi, Punjab, India, during an impressive and well attended service held there on 8 November 1920

Sold together with some copied research including respective medal roll entries and Medal Index Card

An uncommon IGS medal to the Gordons.

The medals mounted for display, with an engraved name plaque

Condition: About EF

Code: 18068Price:


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A Pipe-Majors group of 7: Pipe-Major D. 'Swank' McLeod, 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders

- British War Medal. Silver issue (3-7366 Pte. D. Macleod. Seaforth)
- Interallied Victory Medal (3-7366 Pte. D. Macleod. Seaforth)
- IGS Medal 1908. GV 'North West Frontier 1930-31' (2810142 Sjt. D. Mac Leod.Seaforth)
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- Military LSGC. GVI 'Regular Army' (2810142. W.O.Cl.2. D. Macleod. Seaforth)
- Efficiency Medal, GVI first 'Territorial' (2810142 W.O.Cl.2. D. McLeod, Seaforth)

The group court mounted for display.

Pipe-Major Donald 'Swank' Macleod served during the Great War with the 2nd and 7th Battalions Seaforth Highlanders, the former''s Pipers (of which Macleod is listed in the Regimental records) were, ''largely employed as runners, orderlies, etc., and suffered very heavy casualties. On several occasions during the open fighting they were employed in the attack as pipers. Of 23 pipers who went to France with the battalion 6 were killed and 10 wounded in the first year of the war. The opinion of the officers is that only the difficulty of reinforcements limits the employment of pipers in action.''

Provenance: Matt Taylor Collection, Christies (London) 1983

Research: The medals accompanied with some copied research including photograph of recipient in uniform, as part of the 'Highland Brigade Gathering Cawnpore, 1931 - Pipe Majors'

Condition: Great Wars medal polished GF, others GVF

Code: 10967Price: 1975.00 GBP

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