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South Africa Service Medal 1877-1879. With clasp '1879' (1001. Pte J. Reid. 91st Foot.)

South Africa Service Medal 1877-1879. With clasp '1879' (1001. Pte J. Reid. 91st Foot.)


Note: An award for the Zulu War of 1879, to a Private soldier of the 91st Princess Louise's Argyllshire Highlanders - which post 1881 became 1st Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

Important: Medal and clasp verified per the respective campaign medal roll of the 91st Foot (ref WO 100/47) compiled and signed at Capetown, Cape Colony, on 21 September 1880

During the Zulu War of 1879, 3 x Scottish infantry regiments were deployed, viz, 21st Foot (later Royal Scots Fusiliers), 90th Foot (later 2nd Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and 91st Foot (later 1st Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders) - the 91st being the only 'Highland' regiment to serve in Zululand where it fought at the battles of Gingindlovu, and Eshowe, in April 1879

John Reid, son of John Reid & Isabella Reid (nee Grossert) was a native of, South Leith, nr Leith, County of Edinburgh, Scotland, where he was born in 1859. By trade a 'Labourer', John was 18 years and 3 months of age when he enlisted for the British Army at Edinburgh, Scotland, on 24 July 1877, in the regimental district of, 58th Brigade, and the following day being sent to Stirling Castle, where he joined the 91st Foot. His terms of engagement were 6 years 'With the Colours' and 6 years on the Army Reserve. John's subsequent military career with 'The Colours', spent with 91st Foot (post 1881 1st Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders) comprised several years overseas service, viz:

- South Africa: 19/02/1879 - 07/10/1879
- Mauritius: 08/10/1879 - 26/05/1881
- South Africa: 27/05/1881 - 10/12/1882

John Reid was transferred to the Army Reserve on 24 July 1883. When he took his initial discharge from the British Army, his character was described as 'Good'. On, 24 July 1885. John Reid married Isabella Paterson, at St. Johns, South Leith, in the county of Edinburgh. In 1893, and by then a father of four children, and working as a 'Porter' in Leith, John re-enlisted in the Militia, serving several years with the 3rd (Militia) Battalion of the Royal Scots, and later transferring to join the Edinburgh Artillery

Sold together with a good hard-copy set of the recipient's service papers confirming both his regular army and militia service

Condition: GVF

Code: 20860

SOLD


Afghanistan Medal 1878-80. No clasp (1st. Corpl. G. Ashmon. Bo: S & M.)

Afghanistan Medal 1878-80. No clasp (1st. Corpl. G. Ashmon. Bo: S & M.)

Note: Medal is officially engraved and exactly as issued with no corrections, to 'G. Ashmon' (sic) - the recipient being 'Joseph Ashman'

Typical of the prolific transcription / transliteration errors with medals of the Indian Army for the Afghan War, of the British & Indian casualties of the Bombay Sappers & Miners 'killled-in-action' at Maiwand and whose details were published in the London Gazette issue of 19 November 1880 - the majority of the names have transcription / transliteration errors compared to the names published in the 'The Military Engineer in India'. Volume 1 (Sandes, 1933) - including Sergeant Edward D. Heaphy, shown variously as 'Heapy' & 'Heaphy'

Important: The recipient 1st Corporal Joseph Ashman (Royal Engineers) attached to No 2. Company Bombay Sappers & Miners was 'Killed-in-Action' at Maiwand, Afghanistan, on 27th July 1880 - and possibly one of the 'Last 11' that fought to the death led by his officer - Lieutenant T. R Henn (Royal Engineers) - the only British Officer amongst the 'Last Eleven, and who led the 'Last Eleven' men in the fatal final charge, and last action at Maiwand

Joseph Ashman, son of William Ashman (Scale Maker Journeyman) & Mary Ashman (nee) was a native of Shoreditch, Middlesex, England, where he was born on 1848. The 1851 National Census for England & Wales shows Joseph residing with his family at the 'Workhouse' located at 'Land of Promise,' Saint Leonard Shoreditch, Shoreditch, London & Middlesex, England. In 1851, Joseph's family comprised his parents, and 4 x siblings (elder sisters Mary Ashman & Sarah Ashman, and brothers Thomas Ashman and Charles Ashman. Joseph joined the British Army sometime prior to 1868, and was posted to the Corps of Royal Engineers, where he was given the regimental number. Joseph subsequently served in the Abyssinia Campaign of 1868, at which time he was serving with the 10th Company R.E. (reference the respective campaign medal roll vide WO). By the time of the 1871 National Census for England & Wales, Joseph is recorded as a Sapper, serving with the Royal Engineers at Dover Castle, Chatham, Kent. Sometime in or chose 1871, Joseph chose to transfer for service with the British Cadre of 'Non Commissioned Officer' from the Royal Engineers who served with the Bombay Sappers & Miners of the Bombay Sappers & Miners of the Bombay Presidency Army. The number of European NCO's attached to the Bombay Sappers & Miners was not high (in 1885 the number was set at 25) with only 2-3 European N.C.O.s attached to each of the Field Company's. By the time of the Afghan War, Joseph was holding the rank of 1st Corporal and serving with 2nd Company Bombay Sappers & Miners, as part of the Kandahar Field Force.

At Maiwand, on 27 July 1881, the only 'Sapper' unit attached to the Brigade led by Brigadier General G. R. S. Burrows, was 2nd Company Bombay Sappers & Miners. 1st Corporal Joseph Ashman, together with Sergeant Edward D. Heaphy (both Royal Engineers) was one of only 2 x European NCO's serving with a half-company of the 2nd Company Bombay Sappers and Miners, under command of Lieutenant T. R. Henn, Royal Engineers. In total Henn's understrength Sapper unit comprised only 44 x All-Ranks, European and Indian. Reference Volume I 'The Military Engineer in India' (Sandes, 1933):

Quote,

An Indian regiment broke, others followed suit, and all was confusion. The 66th Regiment (British) fought most stubbornly and lost nearly two-thirds of its men, but it could not check the rout. Yet among the Indian soldiers were some whose courage rose as high as that of their British comrades. The Bombay Sappers and Miners under Lieutenant T. R. Henn earned undying fame on the stricken field of Maiwand. They were the last of all the troops to leave the line of battle. When the tide of retreat swept over them as they lay in support of the Horse Artillery they still remained a formed body and did not retire till they had covered the withdrawal of the guns. Henn and 14 of his men then joined a party of the 66th Regiment and some Bombay Grenadiers, and these 90 soldiers made a most determined stand in a small enclosure at a place called Khig. So grim was their bearing that the Afghans dared not close with them. The defenders fired steadily, losing man after man, until only 11 were left, and these 11 charged out at last and fought to the death in the masses of the enemy. Henn was the only officer in that gallant band, and he led the final charge. He died as Durnford, another Royal Engineer, had done in the previous year at Isandlwana in Zululand. He might have joined in the general retirement; but he chose instead to die, and he died in good company

Unquote

The London Gazette issue of 19 November 1880, gave below casualty analysis for 2 Company Bombay Sappers at Maiwand:

No. 2 Co., Sappers and Miners.—European officers killed 1; European non-commissioned officers and men killed 2. Total 3. Native non-commissioned officers and men killed 15. Total 15. Native officers wounded 1; Native non-commissioned officers and men wounded 6. Total 7. Followers killed 6

Note: A search of the digitized India Office Collections shows nil records of anyone called Ashmon (sic) having ever been born, served, married or died in British India - similarly there is no record of anyone called G Ashman or Ashmon ever having served in the Royal Engineers in the in the period 1870-1880.

What is certain is that 1st Corporal Joseph Ashman was one of the immortal band of British and Indian Sappers that fought and died on the field at Maiwand - possibly - at the side of his commanding officer - which latter was amongst the 'Last Eleven'

A rare and desirable Maiwand casualty medal

Condition: Traces of lacquer about GVF

Code: 20859

SOLD


1914-15 Star (Mangta, Swpr. 1/5/Gurkha Rfls. F.F.)

1914-15 Star (Mangta, Swpr. 1/5/Gurkha Rfls. F.F.)

Note: The recipient was an Indian non-combatant, performing the trade of 'Sweeper', while serving with the 1st Battalion 5th Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force)

When the Great War broke out in August 1914, 1/5 GR was stationed at Abbottabad, India. The battalion was subsequently mobilized for overseas service, and left Abbottabad on, 3 November 1914, at which time the marching-out strength of 1/5 GR was 12 x British Officers, 17 x Gurkha Officers and 808 x Gurkha 'Other Ranks', besides a number of regimental followers - the Commanding Officer (Boisragon) held the Victoria Cross and the Subadar-Major (Harkabir Thapa), held the Indian Order of Merit. 1/5 GR embarked at Karachi aboard the B.I.N.S. Co ship the S.S. 'Barpeta' on 17 November 1914, and disembarked at, Suez, Egypt, on 4 December 1914. The battalion remained in Egypt through to 30 May 1915, during which time it served with the 'Canal Defence Force'. The next theatre of war for 1/5 GR was to be 'Gallipoli', where 1/5 GR disembarked at 'V Beach' Cape Helles, on 3 June 1915, taking up positions at Gully Ravine

The 1st Battalion, 5th Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force) was one of three Gurkha Battalions (the others were 1/6 GR & 2/10 GR) that served with great gallantry and distinction in the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign. 1/5 GR were amongst the last troops to be evacuated from Gallipoli, when they embarked on,19 December, 1915, reaching Mudros the following
day

1/5 GR returned to British India in February 1916, and took part in several operations on the North West Frontier of India 1916-1917, before in March 1917, embarking for further overseas service in theatre of war 'Mesopotamia'

5th Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force) were awarded the title 'Royal' in 1921 - the only Gurkha Rifles regiment - to be so honoured in the history of the British Indian Army

Condition: VF

Code: 20858

SOLD


1914-15 Star (No.28. B. /Manbir Rai, 2/7/ Gurkha Rfls.)

1914-15 Star (No.28. B. /Manbir Rai, 2/7/ Gurkha Rfls.)

Important: Rifleman (Bugler) Manbir Rai confirmed 'Killed-in-Action' on 23 November 1915, during the Battle of Ctesiphon, where 2nd Battalion 7th Gurkha Rifles fought against the Ottoman Turkish Forces

Note: The low 2 x digits regimental number indicate that Manbir Rai was an original enlistment on the muster roll of the 2nd Battalion 7th Gurkha Rifles which battalion was raised in British India in 1907

The recipient was a Nepalese of Gurkha ethnicity, who served as a 'Bugler' (his appointment is abbreviated on the medal after his regimental number) while serving with, 2nd Battalion 7th Gurkha Rifles, an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army

Manbir Rai, was the son of Sirilal Rai, of Okhrabung, Dhankuta, Nepal. Manbir's supreme sacrifice is perpetuated for posterity by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, where he his commemorated on Panel 55 & 67 of the Basra War Memorial, located in Iraq

Compared to the prolific numbers of Gurkhas that served in 1914-1915, very few of their corresponding campaign stars are extant in 2021 - consequently all stars to Gurkha casualties from 1915 are scarce on the market

Condition: About VF

Code: 20857

SOLD


Silver War badge (B169265)

Silver War badge (B169265)


The SWB positively identified as the badge awarded to 103333 Gunner Douglas Maggs Durston of the Royal Garrison Artillery (Ref WO 329/2988)

Gunner Durston enlisted into the British Army on 13 September 1916, and took his discharge from the Army on 14 February 1919

During the Great War Gunner Dunston never served overseas (served United Kingdom, and or Ireland, and the Silver War Badge represents his only reward for his military service

Douglas Maggs Durston, son of David James Durston & Blanche Durston was a native of, Plymouth, Devon, England, where he was born on 25 September 1895. By profession a Musician, Douglas is recorded as having died at Plymouth, England, sometime during the last quarter of 1965

The badge complete with hinged pin and clasp fittings as issued

Condition: GVF

Code: 20855

25.00 GBP


General Service Medal 1918. GV 1st issue with clasp 'S. Persia' (5118 Sepoy Baz Khan. 1-127-Baluchis)

General Service Medal 1918. GV 1st issue with clasp 'S. Persia' (5118 Sepoy Baz Khan. 1-127-Baluchis)

Important: The GSM Medal and clasp verified per the respective medal roll of 1/127 Baluchis (Ref WO 100/G43/453) that was compiled and signed at Chaman Cantonment, India, on 17 September 1923. The medal roll with remarks showing that Sepoy Baz Khan had already been 'Discharged' from the British Indian Army, by the time the medal roll was compiled

Reference WO 100/G43/453) the medal roll of 1/127 Baluchis for the GSM with clasp 'S. Persia' show that a total of 1169 x medals and clasp were claimed in 1923, and subsequently forwarded to the regiment. By 1928, just over more than half (over 51%) of the medals and clasps were remaining with the regiment as unclaimed, and undelivered to the recipients. In 1928, the regiment claimed that 602 medals (the receivers count was actually 598 x medals) were returned to the War Office for taking into stock (and subsequent scrapping) at the Royal Mint.

For Indian Army infantry regiments, like the Baluch Regiment, that typically recruited heavily from amongst Pathans from the tribal territories of the North West Frontier, and from nomadic tribes scattered across the Baluchistan Agency, the distribution of Great War era medals earned by men who had taken their discharges in the early inter-war years, was generally difficult. The resulting high numbers of medals remaining undelivered, were returned to the War Office, and thence back to the Royal Mint for scrapping!

The recipient was a soldier of the Muslim faith serving as a Sepoy (Private) with the 1st Battalion 127th Queen Mary's Own Baluch Light Infantry, an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army

In 1922 the 127th Baluchis were re-styled 3rd Battalion (Queen Mary's Own) 10th Baluch Regiment or 3/10th Baluch, and in 1947, on transfer to the Pakistan Army became, 3rd Battalion (Queen Mary's Own) The Baluch Regiment. In 2021, the regiment continued to serve in the Pakistan Army as, 10th Battalion The Baloch Regiment, or 10 Baloch

Condition: Toned GVF

Code: 20853

SOLD


India General Service Medal 1908-1935. GV first issue. Silver with clasp 'Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919' (299 Sowar Bostan Khan, 42/Cavy.)

India General Service Medal 1908-1935. GV first issue. Silver with clasp 'Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919' (299 Sowar Bostan Khan, 42/Cavy.)

Note: The number rank and given name officially re-impressed - and exactly as issued to the recipients Next of Kin

Important: the recipient is confirmed Died (or Killed-in-Action?) in East Persia, 5 January 1920, and is commemorated on the Tehran Memorial, located at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, Tehran, Iran

The recipient was an a Punjabi Mussalman, who served as a Sowar (Trooper) with the 42nd Cavalry, a mounted regiment of the British Indian Army

The 42nd Cavalry was a short lived, 'War Raised' regiment of the British Indian Arm. The 42nd Cavalry were raised in August 1918 - and subsequentl, barely three years later, was disbanded in 1921. It was a mixed class regiment comprising, Sikhs, Punjabi Musslamans, Pathans, Dogras & Hindustani Mussalmans

Though short-lived, the regiment did experience active service, firstly serving with the 'Baluchistan Field Force' during the Third Afghan War of 1919, and later that year was deployed to the 'East Persia Force' in Persia, where the regiment served 1919-1920 (and for which it did not qualify for the General Service Medal 1918). During its service in Persia, patrolling the Persian borders, the 42nd Cavalry, had its regimental depot based at Sibi, Baluchistan (now in Pakistan)

The regiment has 12 x casualties, all natives (including 3 x non-combatant followers), recorded by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Four names are recorded on the India Gate Memorial in Delhi, comprising 2 x other-ranks & 2 x followers, while the remaining 8 x deaths are recorded on the Tehran Memorial, comprising 7 x other-ranks & 1 x follower. The earliest death date amongst the 'East Persia' casualties is 21 December 1919, with the remaining 7 x deaths falling in the period 1-9 January 1920. Except for a solitary immediate award of an Indian Meritorious Service Medal being awarded to 42nd Cavalry (for service with Baluchistan Field Force / Third Afghan War), the native ranks of the regiment are not credited with any other gallantry medals for its services in Afghanistan or Est Persia

Bostan Khan, son of Ranje Khan, was a native of, Thoa Khalsa, Kahuta, Paunjab (now in Pakistan)

Presumably the death of Bostan Khan, in Persia, was due either to having died of ill-health, or, was killed or died of wounds received in a 'Police Action'

A rare medal to a cavalry trooper who subsequently lost his life while serving in Persia (now Iran) in 1920

Condition: With official corrections about VF

Code: 20852

SOLD


India General Service 1908-35. GV issue second type with clasp 'Burma 1930-32' (125 Sub. Insp. Mg E Po, Police Dept.)

India General Service 1908-35. GV issue second type with clasp 'Burma 1930-32' (125 Sub. Insp. Mg E Po, Police Dept.)


The recipient, Maung E Po, was a Burmese national holding the 'Officer' rank of Sub-Inspector while serving with the Police Department

Note: The name Maung is abbreviated as Mg, per the customary naming protocols for Burmese recipients

Condition: GVF

Code: 20851

125.00 GBP


India General Service Medal 1908-35. GV Calcutta Mint second issue with clasp 'North West Frontier 1930-31' (8804 Sep. Ali Khan. Kurram Mil.)

India General Service Medal 1908-35. GV Calcutta Mint second issue with clasp 'North West Frontier 1930-31' (8804 Sep. Ali Khan. Kurram Mil.)

The recipient Ali Khan, held the rank of 'Sepoy' (Private) while serving with the Kurram Militia, a 'Frontier Corps' that was based and deployed in the Kurram Valley 'Tribal Territory' region of the North West Frontier of British India

The Kurram Militia (established in 1892), was headquartered at 'Parachinar', and was organized in two wings each of which comprised of 3 x companies. By 1905, the total number of all-ranks serving in the Kurram Militia was reported to be 1475

The native ranks of the Kurram Militia were recruited exclusively from the local 'Turi' tribesmen. Amongst the Pathan tribes of the North West Frontier, the 'Turi' were distinct as being adherents of the Muslim 'Shiah' sect, whereas the clans in the surrounding tribal areas bordering the Kurram Valley were adherents of the 'Sunni' sect

Condition: About VF

Code: 20850

85.00 GBP


India General Service 1908-35. GV issue second type with clasp 'North West Frontier 1930-31 (10869 Sep. Sher Zaman, 2-10 Baluch R.)

India General Service 1908-35. GV issue second type with clasp 'North West Frontier 1930-31 (10869 Sep. Sher Zaman, 2-10 Baluch R.)

The recipient was a Punjabi Mussalman soldier who was holding the rank of Sepoy (Private) while serving with 2nd Battalion 10th Baluch Regiment, an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army

During the Second World War 2/10 Baluch served in the Malaya Campaign 1941-42, with 8th Indian Infantry Brigade under higher command of 9th Indian Division. The remnants of the battalion surrendering at Singapore Colony on 15 February 1942 - the survivors subsequently enduring several years of harsh captivity as Far East Prisoners of War

Condition: VF

Code: 20849

70.00 GBP


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