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Military Long Service & Good Conduct Medal. GV first issue (Sub-Condr. R. D. Lovick I.M.L.)

Military Long Service & Good Conduct Medal. GV first issue (Sub-Condr. R. D. Lovick I.M.L.)



Important: The Indian Army List includes many listings for Conductor Lovick, who served as a 'Manager' attached to the Military Farms Department of the Indian Army

The recipient, Ronald Douglas Lovick, was serving as a Sub-Conductor with the Indian Miscellaneous List, of the British Indian Army, at the time of qualifying for his Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

In addition to the LS&GC Medal, Ronald Lovick was also awarded a single British War Medal for his overseas service in India during the Great War (ref WO 329/2352), at which time he held the appointment of Warrant Officer I

Ronald Douglas Lovick, son of Andrew Nesbitt Lovick (in 1901 was a Sergeant Instructor with 1st & 2 Volunteer Battalions Oxfordshire Light Infantry) & Joanna Jane Lovick (nee Edmond) was a native of, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England, where he was born on 13 July 1881. Ronald enlisted in the British Army, and subsequently served with the British Army in India, where in 1904, he was stationed at Jhansi Cantonment, and where he was initiated as a Freemason, becoming of the 'Rock of Gwalior Lodge'. In 1905, Robert married Beatrice Mabel Wyatt, at Colaba, Bombay, British India, At the time of his marriage he was holding the rank of Staff Sergeant Holding the rank of Staff Sergeant, Ronald was stationed at Bangalore Cantonment in 1908, in which year his son Edmonde Maurice Lovick was born on 20 September 1908. A daughter, Marjorie Hilda Joanna Lovick, was born at Lucknow, India, on 18 January 1913

Below following is a summary of Ronald's stations served and promotions gained from 1905-1920 while attached to the Indian Miscellaneous List:

- 1905: Military Farms Department, Allahabad - Staff Sergeant & 'Manager'
- 1908: Military Farms Department, Bangalore - Staff Sergeant
- 1911: Military Farms Department, Belgaum - Sub-Conductor
- 1912: Military Farms Department, Belgaum - Sub-Conductor
- 1913: Military Farms Department, Lucknow - Sub-Conductor
- 1914: Military Farms Department, Lucknow - Sub-Conductor
- 1914: Military Farms Department, Lucknow - Sub-Conductor
- 1915: Military Farms Department - Sub-Conductor
- 1916: Military Farms Department - Sub-Conductor
- 1917: Military Farms Department - Sub-Conductor
- 1918: Military Farms Department - Sub-Conductor
- 1919: Military Farms Department - Conductor
- 1920: Military Farms Department - Conductor

Throughout the period 1904-1920, Ronald served throughout with the Military Farms Department

By 1922, Ronald Douglas Lovick had retired from the Indian Army. The 1939 National Register of England & Wales records Douglas described as 'Indian Army Rtd' and residing with his family at, Herondale, 175 Wilbury Crescent Road, Burgess Hill, Sussex, England. Post 1945, Ronald, changed his residence to, 3 Midfields Drive, Burgess Hill, Sussex. Ronald died at, Cuckfield Hospital, Sussex, England, on 24 January 1962

Military Farms Department: Formed part of the supply services of the Indian Army, and by 1940 was controlled by the Quarter Master General, who also controlled the Royal Indian Army Service Corps. The Military Farms Department had its origins in 1884, when it was organised as a 'Branch of the Commissariat Department, becoming a separate unit 'The Military Farms Department' in 1912. The principal functions of the Military Farms Department were to manage the Grass & Dairy Farms to provide fodder for military animals and fresh supplies of dairy products for military personnel - other functions in which the Military Farms excelled included animal stock breeding (especially cattle)

A most uncommon medal to a Military Farmer of the British Indian Army

Condition: Toned GVF

Code: 20716

SOLD


Military Long Service & Good Conduct Medal. GV first issue (S/Sergt P. H. Mathews. P. W. D.)

Military Long Service & Good Conduct Medal. GV first issue (S/Sergt P. H. Mathews. P. W. D.)

The recipient, Percy Hubert Mathews was serving as a Staff Sergeant with the Public Works Department at the time of qualifying for his Long Service & Good Conduct Medal

Percy Hubert Mathews, son of William Alfred Mathews and Laura Rosamond Emma Mathews (nee Anderson) was a British subject born in Tanjore, Madras Presidency, India, on 9 September 1880. Like his father before him who had served as a Supervisor with the Department of Public Works, Percy enlisted in the British Army and later served with the Public Works Department. On 30 December 1912, Percy (32) married Sybil Winifred Smith (30) at St Andrews Church, Madras, India. At the time of the wedding, he was described as an Overseer with the Public Works Department. Percy Hubert Mathews is recorded as having died on 4th June 1968 (he had been preceded by his wife Sybil, who had died on 20 September 1962).

Some splendid wedding portrait photographs of Percy Hubert Mathews and his bride, together with other family members and more biographical details are available and accessible on the Ancestry genealogy website

Condition: GVF

Code: 20715

100.00 GBP


Military Order of the Dragon. Bronze 'Replica'. Complete with integral top 'Pagoda' bar

Military Order of the Dragon. Bronze 'Replica'. Complete with integral top 'Pagoda' bar



A fine die struck un-named and un-marked 'Replica'

The integral top 'Pagoda' bar, retaining its hinged pin with intricate drop-lock clasp fittings on reverse of the bar

The Military Order of the Dragon - a United States fraternal military award - was exclusively awarded (on membership / subscription) to veteran Officers of the United States and Allied Nations that served in China during the Boxer Rebellion 1900

A most attractive veterans award - and ideal for framed display purposes, or, reconstituting groups of medals now missing their 'Dragons'.....

Condition: About EF

Code: 20713

SOLD


An attractive 'Gilded' pair of Jubilee & Coronation Medals: Inspector George Vine, Royal Society for the Protection of Children, late 'V' or Wandsworth Division Metropolitan Police, & formerly of 'K' 'W' 'R' & 'S' Divisions

An attractive 'Gilded' pair of Jubilee & Coronation Medals: Inspector George Vine, Royal Society for the Protection of Children, late 'V' or Wandsworth Division Metropolitan Police, & formerly of 'K' 'W' 'R' & 'S' Divisions


- Jubilee Medal 1887. Bronze (gilded) clasp '1897' (PC G Vine W.Div),
- Coronation Medal 1902. Bronze (gilded) (PS G Vine S.Div)

Important: After retiring from the Police (1908) in the recipient was appointed an Inspector with the National Society for the Protection of Childten from Cruelty (the 1911 National Census refers)

Both medals retaining their original silk medals ribands Each medal fitted with a contemporary medal mounting brooch. Both brooches retaining their hinged pin and clasp fittings

Note: The recipient had his medals professionally gilded, and are strikingly attractive for it

George Vine, son of William Vine & Harriet Vine (nee Harwood), was a native of, Storrington, Sussex, England, where he was born on 24 April 1863. George joined the Metropolitan Police at Great Scotland Yard on 13 April 1885, at which time he was appointed a 'Constable' and was posted to 'K' Division (Stepney). George Vine served a total of 22 years & 299 days with the Metropolitan Police, and was holding the appointment of Inspector while serving with 'V' or Wandsworth Division of the Metrpolitan Police at the time of his retirement from the force on, 6 February 1908. During his time in the Metropolitan Police George Vine served with the below following 'Divisions':

- 'K' or Stepney Division (
- 'W' or Clapham Division (Serving as a Police Sergeant in 1902)
- 'R' or Greenwich Division
- 'S' or Hamsptead Division
- 'V' or Wandsworth Division

George Vine married Ellen Charity Barnard in 1869, and the couple subsequently had 2 x sons (William G. Vine & Ronald G. Vine) and 1 x daughter (Nellie G. Vine). Their eldest son William George Vine, migrated to Canada sometime before 1914, where in 1914 he was recorded as being employed as a 'Chauffer'. Sadly, William Vine, enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force ad was later reported 'Killed-in-Action' in France, on 14 July 1916. After his retirement form the Metropolitan Police, at the age of 44 years, Inspector George Vine, was employed with the National Society for the Protection of Children from Cruelty, or N.S.P.C.C. (1911 National Census refers). George Vine is recorded as having died at, Southlards Hospital, Shoreham, Sussex, England, on, 21 October 1944

An obituary to George Vine was published in the 'Worthing Herald' issue of 3 November 1944, and is quoted below:

Quote;

Funeral of Mr George Vine at Storrington

Unquote.

George Vine's Metropolitan Police pension papers are extant and are held and accessible at The National Archives, London

Condition: Gilded about EF

Code: 20711

SOLD


A 'Railwayman's' Delhi Durbar & Long Service Medal Pair: Volunteer George Herbert Kennedy, 1st Battalion Bombay Baroda and Central India Railway Volunteer Rifles

A 'Railwayman's' Delhi Durbar & Long Service Medal Pair: Volunteer George Herbert Kennedy, 1st Battalion Bombay Baroda and Central India Railway Volunteer Rifles



A 'Railwayman's' Delhi Durbar & Long Service Medal Pair: Volunteer George Herbert Kennedy, 1st Battalion Bombay Baroda and Central India Railway Volunteer Rifles

- Delhi Durbar Medal 1911. Silver issue
- Volunteer Force Long Service Medal (India & the Colonies). GV issue (Voltr. G. H. Kennedy 1st Bn B. B. & C.I. Ry. Voltr Rfls.)

Important: Both medals verified as under:

- Durbar Medal 1911: 1 of 43 x awarded to unit (Ref 'The Auxiliary Force India and its predecessors' (Alan Harfield, 2015)
- Volunteer Long Service Medal (India & the Colonies): Awarded per Army Order 86 of March 1915

George Herbert Kennedy, son of John George Kennedy (1866-1939, late of 11 Cantonments, Neemuch in Central retired European retired railway railway employee European, ex B.B.& C.I.) was born circa 1887 at Bombay and entered the Bombay Baroda and Central India Railway Volunteer Rifles as a teenage cadet volunteer. He is confirmed upon the Roll for the Delhi Durbar 1911 from the Railway Board Civil Allotment and was a Clerk in the Bombay, Baroda & Central India Railway Engineer's Office (Construction) upon his marriage in 1912. Chief Clerk at Mahaluxmi, Bombay in 1914. George Kennedy was awarded his Long Service Medal was issued in March 1915 (Army Order 86, refers). George latterly served as Acting Secretary, in the Agents and General Managers Office, and in addition held the appointment of Justice of the Peace. George Kennedy, died of a bleeding ulcer on 30 September 1942 and was buried at the Pro-Cathedral of the Holy Name, Bombay, India

Sold together with a quantity of hard-copy research

Condition: GVF

Code: 20710

285.00 GBP


A poignant 'His Chum Died in his Arms' Old Contemptible's & India Sweat's' Great War campaign & long service medal group of 4: Private Frederick William Hailey, Corps of Military Police late 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade

A poignant 'His Chum Died in his Arms' Old Contemptible's & India Sweat's' Great War campaign & long service medal group of 4: Private Frederick William Hailey, Corps of Military Police late 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade



- 1914 Star. No clasp (1886 Pte F. Hailey. 2/Rif: Brig.)
- British War. Silver issue (1886 Pte. F. Hailey. Rif. Brig.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1886 Pte. F. Hailey. Rif. Brig.)
- Military LS&GC Medal. GV 2nd type (7681757 Pte. F. W. Hailey. C. of Mil. P.)

Frederick William Hailey initially served during the Great War with the 2nd Battalion, Rifle Brigade in the French theatre of war from 9 November 1914. He subsequently transferred to the Military Foot Police.

Frederick is confirmed as having written & sent a letter of comfort from the 'Trenches' to the fiancee of a fallen comrade - his chum Corporal Percy George Redman, 2/Rifle Rifle Brigade - who was 'Killed-in-Action' by a 'Sniper' on 14 March 1915, during the Battle of Neuve Chapelle. The letter was published in the Chichester Observer issue of, 7 April 1915. From the contents of the letter, it is evident that Frederick Hailey was in the thick of the fighting at Neauve Chapelle - wherat 2/Rifle Brigade suffered 12 x officers and 365 x other ranks killed & wounded during the fighting between 10-14 March 1915.

Quote,

Fishbourne Man's Death

News has been received of the death of Corporal Percy Redman of the Rifle Brigade, whose home was at Clay Lane, Fishbourne. Very pathetic was the letter in which the sad news was to his fiancee. It was written by a comrade, Rifleman Hailey, and ran as follows:-

"I hope you will forgive me if you think I am taking a liberty in writing to you, but as Percy was my chum I think it is my duty to tell you of his death. He died in my arms, and did not have the chance to say even a word, as it was all so sudden.

We had both got through the attack all right, and I can assure you it was terrible, and one of these days, if you will alow me, I will write and tell you all about it. The day before Percy was captured we had captured five Germans in a cellar. You can take it from me that Percy died a soldier;s death and was't a bit afraid of death or the Germans.

You have the satisfaction of knowing that he was true to his country to the last. He was killed by a sniper, and was buried in the firing line at Neuve Chapelle, and all the time he was being buried the Germans were shelling us.

I want you to accept please my deepest sympathy and that of his officers, who are very much upset over it. Percy was loved by all his Company, and I know I shall never forget him. I am sending his cap-badge, which he was always saying was for you, and also your locket and lock of hair, which I took from his pocket."

Unquote.

Important: A search of on-line medal rolls confirm that there was only one 'Rifleman Hailey' serving with 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade, in March 1915, and that was 1886 Rifleman Frederick William Hailey

The medals mounted as-worn in the swing style. The silk ribands suspended from a mounting bar that retains its long hinged pin and clasp fittings

Condition: Polished mostly about VF

Code: 20709

Reserved


A Great War Gunner Casualty group of 4 including a rare Borough Polytechnic Fire Brigade 1911 Coronation Medal: Bombardier Hedley George Wood, 'D' Battery, 156th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, late Section Officer, Borough Polytechnic Fire Brigade

A Great War Gunner Casualty group of 4 including a rare Borough Polytechnic Fire Brigade 1911 Coronation Medal: Bombardier Hedley George Wood, 'D' Battery, 156th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, late Section Officer, Borough Polytechnic Fire Brigade


- 1914-15 Star (21655 Bmbr. H. G. Wood. R.F.A.)
- British War Medal 1914-20 (21655 Bmbr. H. G. Wood. R.A.)
- Interallied Victory Medal 1914-19 (21655 Bmbr. H. G. Wood. R.A.)
- Borough Polytechnic FB: Coronation Medal 1911. (Section Officer H. G. Wood.)

Casualty: Hedley G. Wood's extant service records (held and accessible at The National Archives) confirm that he was firstly 'Kicked by a Horse & Gassed' on 6 June 1916, and later, on 2 September 1917 was severely 'Wounded-in-Action' by Gunshot & Shrapnel (GSW) wound to 'Back & Kidney's' - and evacuated thereafter to the United Kingdom

The Great War Medals verified as entitled per the respective Great War medal rolls:

- 1914-15 Star: Reference WO 329/2593
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Reference WO 329/444

Hedley George Wood, son of Frederick Edwin Wood (who in 1915 was living at, 6 Ossory Road, Old Kent Road, London ) and Ada Wood (nee Tucker), was a native of Borden, Kent, England, where he was born circa 1892. As a student, Hedley attended the Borough Polytechnic Institute (now called the London Southbank University), London, where he was an active volunteer member of the private Borough Polytechnic Fire Brigade. In 1911, Hedley was serving as a 'Section Officer' with the Borough Polytechnic Fire Brigade, being awarded the rare 1911 Coronation Medal issued by the Borough Polytechnic Institute Fire Brigade. Albeit Hedley's occupation group code was '26' (reserved for Engineers) at the time of his enlistment into the British Army, for 'Duration of War', at Camberwell, London, on, 11 May 1915, he declared his occupation to be that of 'Tobacconist', and was 23 years of age. On 12 May 1915, at East Dulwich, London, Hedley was posted to 'D' Battery 156 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Hedley embarked for overseas service at Southampton on 12 December 1915, and disembarked at Le Havre, in theatre of war, France, on 13 December 1915. The recipients service papers record that he was 'Kicked by a Horse and Gassed' on 6 June 1916 (sent to 101 Field Ambulance, Amines and thence to No 1 New Zealand General Service Hospital) , and later, on 2 September 1917, received Gunshot & Shrapnel Wounds (GSW) to his 'Back & Kidneys'. Hedley married Bessie Isaac, in London on 30 March 1918. Prior to being discharged from the British Army, Hedley Wood was latterly serving with the Royal Engineers (holding regimental number 364682) when he was discharged on transfer to the 'Z Class' Army Reserve on 10 April 1919. Unfortunately, and despite having survived the horrors of the Western Front where he had been gassed and survived severe wounds, Hedley, was not destined to live a full life as his father reported his death to the Army Records Office, in 1923. Hedley George Wood, died in London, England, on, 7 August 1923. At the time of his death, at 5 Brunswick Square, London, Hedley had been employed as a Tobacconist, and prior to his death had resided at, 43 Albany Road, Old Kent Road, London, where he had lived with his wife and widower father

Note: The rare Borough Polytechnic Institute Fire Brigade Coronation Medal was struck by the well known London Medallists 'Elkington' (the obverse has the makers logo beneath the conjoint royal busts) - the firm, best known for their striking's of the Edward Medal for Mines, and the 1902 Coronation series of medals. Details of the medal are:

Dimension: Approx 38mm

Metal: Bronze

Obverse: Conjoint busts of King George V and Queen Mary, beneath the designers marks 'Elkington', surrounded by legend 'Georgius V D.G. Rex. Et Imp Et Maria. Regina'

Reverse: In centre the seal badge of the Borough Polytechnic Institute (comprising beneath a spread leather hide with the 'Bridge House' emblem of the City of London on top and below the date 1892) with biblical quote 'Do It With Thy Might' (from Ecclesiastes 9.10) on either side, surrounded by legend 'Borough Polytechnic Institute. Fire Brigade.'

Naming: Engraved

Suspension: Claw with swivel ring

Riband: Same as 1911 Coronation Medal for the civilian uniformed services

The Borough Polytechnic Institute Fire Brigade - a private Fire Brigade - was established in 1893. Its members were drawn from amongst Volunteers (students and staff) of the Borough Polytechnic Institute, which institute offered a scientific study in 'Fire Engineering'!

The origins of the Borough Polytechnic Institute, courtesy of 'Wikipedia':

Quote,

London South Bank University was founded in 1892 as the Borough Polytechnic Institute. It has since undergone several name changes, becoming the Polytechnic of the South Bank in 1970, South Bank Polytechnic in 1987, South Bank University in 1992 and London South Bank University in 2003. The university has also merged with a number of other educational institutions.

In 1888, Edric Bayley, a local solicitor and member of the London School Board, set up the South London Polytechnics Committee whose members included the Lord Mayor of London, Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Salisbury, Lord Rosebery and Sir Lyon Playfair. The committee was successful in persuading the Charity Commissioners to pledge to match whatever could be raised from the public, up to the sum of £200,000 to establish polytechnics in South London. A public meeting at Mansion House kick-started the public appeal and by 1891 enough money had been raised to establish polytechnics at Battersea and at Borough Road, Southwark, now LSBU

During 1890, the former buildings of Joseph Lancaster's British and Foreign School Society were purchased for the Borough Polytechnic Institute. In May that year, the South London Polytechnics Institutes Act was passed, so that by June 1891 the governing structure and general aims of the new Institute had been created. These aims were "the promotion of the industrial skills, general knowledge, health, and well-being of young men and women" and also for "instruction suitable for persons intending to emigrate". W. M. Richardson was chosen to be clerk to the Governing Body, C. T. Millis was appointed as Headmaster, Miss Helen Smith was appointed Lady Superintendent and Edric Bayley was appointed the first Chair of Governors.

On 30 September 1892, the Borough Polytechnic Institute was officially opened by Lord Rosebery, with a remit to educate the local community in a range of practical skills. The Polytechnic was given a seal based on the Bridge House emblem of the City of London and a motto taken from Ecclesiastes — "Do it with thy Might". A gala event was held to mark the occasion which was widely reported in the press because of Lord Rosebery's speech on the banning of smoking in the new Institute. One of the speeches made included the hope that "the Polytechnic would do its share towards perfecting many a valuable gem found in the slums of London"
The Polytechnic specialised in courses that reflected local trades including leather tanning, typography, metalwork, electrical engineering, laundry, baking, and boot & shoe manufacture. Instruction was also given in art, science, elocution, literature and general knowledge and the Polytechnic held public lectures by the likes of George Bernard Shaw, J. A. Hobson, Henry M. Stanley, and Ralph Vaughan Williams

Unquote

The medals mounted in the swing-style suspended from their original silk ribands the reverse of the mounting bar with brass blade fittings

A rare grouping including the private Fire Brigade medal

Condition: Mostly about EF

Code: 20708

SOLD


A Tipperary Irishman's 'World Wars' medal group of 7: Lt-Colonel William Jospeh Moloney, E.D., Auxiliary Force Medical Corps India, attached Assam Valley Light Horse, late Royal Army Medical Corps

A Tipperary Irishman's 'World Wars' medal group of 7: Lt-Colonel William Jospeh Moloney, E.D., Auxiliary Force Medical Corps India, attached Assam Valley Light Horse, late Royal Army Medical Corps



- 1914-15 Star (Lieut. W. J. Moloney. R.A.M.C.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (Capt. W. J. Moloney.)
- Interallied Victory Medals (Capt. W. J. Moloney.)
- War Medal 1939-45
- India Service Medal
- Coronation Medal 1937
- Efficiency Decoration 'India' (Capt. W. J. Moloney. A.F. (Med. Corps.)

Note: The integral 'India' top bar adapted to facilitate court mounting

Hospital Ship - H.M.H.S. Massilia: Dr Moloney served aboard the Hospital Ship 'Massilia' during the Great War (1914-15 Star medal roll refers). The medical staff of the Massilia comprised 5 x Doctors, 11 x Nurses & Sisters & 44 x R.A.M.C. / St. John orderlies. The ship was fitted with 53 x cots & 322 berths. The 'Massilia' (Glasgow built Cargo-Passenger vessel for the 'Anchor Line') served as Hospital Ship between India & Red Sea ports between 12 May 1915 to 2 March 1916.

The campaign and Efficiency medals verified as entitled per respective medal rolls, India Army Lists and Gazette of India as under:

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2954
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/2289
- War & India Service Medals: IA Lists 1939 to October 1945
- Coronation Medal: Awarded per India allocation Coronation Medal 1937
- Efficiency Decoration: Gazette of India 18 March 1939

Important: (Reference (John Tamplin, ) the Efficiency Decoration 'India' is one only an estimated 116 x gazetted awards of the GVI issue Efficiency Decoration 'India'

William Joseph Moloney, an Irishman, was born on 14 April 1889. The 1915 Medical Directory lists William as a practising Doctor in Ireland located at 'Ballyryan, Monard, Tipperary' with qualifications, M.B., B.C., B.A.O.N.U.I. 1913. He was first commissioned into the Royal Army Medical Corps on 12 October 1915, and as a Lieutenant embarked into a theatre of war on 29 September 1915 (1914-15 Star medal roll refers). During the Great War he served aboard the Hospital Ship 'Massilia'. By the end of the Great War, William was holding the rank of Temporary Captain (promoted Temporary Captain 12 October 1916), at which time he was stationed in Karachi, Sind Province, British India (now in present day Pakistan). William's association with Assam and the Assam Valley Light Horse was a long one. For many years he was employed by James Finlay & Company - one of the great Scottish trading names - that acted as Managing Agents and Tea Producers throughout India and Ceylon Colony, including Tea Plantations in Assam. William is known to have bene employed by Finlay's as one of their Medical Practitioners (Doctor) with the Dhunseri Medical Association located at the Nahorjan Tea Estate, Assam - a model 'Plantations ' medical facility - during the inter-war years. On 21 July 1922, William had first been commissioned into the Auxiliary Forces Medical Corps - the Volunteer Medical Corps of the Auxiliary Forces India, or A.F.I., and basis his residence and employment in the Tea Gardens of Assam he was appointed to the Staff of the Assam Valley Light Horse as one of that regiments Medical Officers - a role he held throughout the period of Second World War. The October 1945 Indian Army List showing him listed under AVLH lists as 'Staff' with appointment Medical Officer, his rank shown as Major (Hony. Lt-Col) with substantive rank date of 20 April 1940

The medals mounted for display in the court-style. The medals stitched by thread on a flock backed board

A very scarce medal group to a long-time expatriate medical practitioner & resident of Assam, who was a Medical Officer of the Assam Valley Light Horse

Condition: GVF

Code: 20707

SOLD


A Merchant Seamans Great War medal group of 3: Thomas Ryan, Mercantile Marine

A Merchant Seamans Great War medal group of 3: Thomas Ryan, Mercantile Marine



- British War Medal. Silver issue (Thomas Ryan)
- Interallied Victory Medal (Thomas Ryan)
- Mercantile Marine War Medal (Thomas Ryan)

Important: The BWM & Interallied Victory Medals, are contemporary renamed. The Mercantile Marine War Medal has officially impressed naming as issued

There are several persons, of the same name, English and Irish, who were awarded Mercantile Marine War Medals, and who lost their lives on the 'High Seas' due to enemy action during the Great War, including Master Mariner Thomas Ryan:

Master Mariner Thomas Ryan, son of Master Mariner Frank Ryan, was a native of Loughshinny, Skerries, County Dublin, Ireland, was Killed-in-Action on 13 April 1918 when the ship he captained the S.S. Harewood, was sunk by the German U-Boat 155. Master Mariner Thomas Ryan also had the distinction of having been posthumously 'Commended for services' and rewarded with a Mention-in-Despatches (MID) that was published in the London Gazette issue of 6 August 1918. During the attack, capture and destruction of the S.S. Harewood, official reports show that only 2 x members of the crew were 'Killed', which included Master Thomas Ryan. The "Harewood" had been and sunk by bombs after a longer lasting gunfight by enemy submarine (U-Boat) the U 155 (Eckelmann). The U 155 was the former 'Deutschland. U 155 scored 4 X direct shell hits during the fight. The "Harewood went down in 37A°20,6'N 16A°59'W. The 'Harewood' was owned by Century Shipping Co. Ltd. at the time of her loss and was heading for Gibraltar with general cargo. An unusually long and detailed article on Thomas Ryan and the history of the that well known 'Ryan' Irish sea-going family was published in a local Irish newspaper, that is accessible on-line, see 'The Fingal Independent' and article therein dated 22 April 2005

The other Merchant Navy casualties of the Great War recorded with the name Thomas Ryan were Liverpool seamen:

- Seaman Thomas Ryan. KIA 02/06/1917, S.S Hollington (U-Boat 95)
- Seaman Thomas Ryan. KIA 31/07/1917, S.S. Belgian Prince (U-Boat 55)

Condition: The medals mostly about EF

Code: 20706

SOLD


A rare 'Anglo-Indian Force' Great War campaign and volunteer Long Service Medal group of 3: Private Herbert Colin Melville Harrison, 2nd Battalion Bombay Nagpur Railway Regiment, Auxiliary Force India, late Anglo-Indian Force

A rare 'Anglo-Indian Force' Great War campaign and volunteer Long Service Medal group of 3: Private Herbert Colin Melville Harrison, 2nd Battalion Bombay Nagpur Railway Regiment, Auxiliary Force India, late Anglo-Indian Force



- British War Medal. Silver issue (681 L-Cpl. H. C. Harrison, A.I. Force.)
- Interallied Victory Medal 1914-19 (681 L-Cpl. H. C. Harrison, A.I. Force.)
- Volunteer LSM (India). GV (Pte. H. C. Harrison, 2. B. N. Ry. R., A.F.I. )

Note: The Interallied Victory Medal only with minor official corrections to 3 x letters of surname & unit, and exactly as issued from the Calcutta Mint

Important: The award of the Volunteer Long Service Medal was published in Indian Army Order No 356 of 1932

Henry Collin Melville Harrison, son of Henry William Harrison (Engine Driver with South Indian Railway) and Jane Harrison (nee Wright) was a native of, Ootacumund, Madras Presidency, where he was born on 20 May 1897 (baptized on 9 June 1897).

During the Great War, Henry was one of just over an estimated 600 Eurasian volunteers that served with the infantry contingent of the war raised (1916) 'Anglo Indian Force', a generic volunteer force that was formed to recruit exclusively from the Eurasian population of British India. Prior to the creation of the 'Anglo Indian Force', it is estimated that the Eurasian community in British India, had already provided 8,000 recruits to the British Armed Forces especially the British Army) and certain Indian Army and Royal Indian Marine services / trades. The 'Anglo Indian Force' comprised, artillery, cavalry and infantry, but never deployed overseas as a composite unit. The Cavalry squadrons were converted to 'Signallers' and served attached to British & Indian cavalry brigades in India and overseas. Some artillery volunteers, served in Mesopotamia attached to front-line units of the Royal Regiment of Artillery. Only a few hundred of the, infantry component, served overseas in Mesopotamia. On arrival in Mesopotamia the infantry of the 'Anglo Indian Force' was dispersed, its men scattered at platoon and company level across the Lines of Communication. A cyber search of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission for casualties of the 'Anglo Indian Force' returned only 10 x names of AIF personnel that lost their lives in the Great War, this included 5 x soldiers that died in India, and 5 x soldiers who died in Mesopotamia - other deaths almost occurred but cannot be ascertained from the CWGC site as the casualties parent unit designation was not always recorded in the returns.......

On his return to India, and discharge from the 'Anglo Indian Force', Herbert was employed with the Bombay Nagpur Railway Company, and located at Kharagpur, India, from where he worked the line of the BNR in his capacity as a 'Travelling Ticket Inspector'. Herbert (25) married Ivy Jane Seal (22) at Kharagpur on, 4 June 1924. By 1943, Herbert was holding the appointment of 'District Inspector Audit', but sadly died that same year, at the 'European Hospital', Kharagpur on, 6 July 1943

A rare Indian Volunteers group and - the only group we have handled (or sighted) - that has additionally included the recipients companion Volunteer Long Service Medal

Condition: The VLSM neatly re-pinned at claw toned VF

Code: 20705

SOLD


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