536 Items Found
Page: 2 of 54
0 Items in Basket »
Previous page Next page
An incredible 15 Year Old 'Bugler' & Youngest Montrose Great War Veteran's 1914 Star medal group of 3: Private Alfred William Aitken, 'C Coy' (Montrose & Craigo) - later No 2. Coy - 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

An incredible 15 Year Old 'Bugler' & Youngest Montrose Great War Veteran's 1914 Star medal group of 3: Private Alfred William Aitken, 'C Coy' (Montrose & Craigo) - later No 2. Coy - 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

- 1914 Star. No clasp (622 Pte. A. Aitken. 1/ 5 R. Highrs:)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (622 Pte. A. Aitken. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (622 Pte. A. Aitken. R. Highrs.)

Note: The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War campaign medal rolls of the 5th Battalion Royal Highlanders viz:

- 1914 Star. No clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/1356

The name 'A. Aitken' is a unique name on the 1914 Star medal roll of the 5th Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

Important: 'Bugler' Alfred Aitken is recorded as being the youngest veteran of the Great War from the Scottish town of Montrose, who landed in France in 1914, at only 15 years of age and who was still a teenager when the Armistice became effective on 11 November 1918.

Several articles / mentions of Bugler Aitken were published in the various issues of the 'Montrose, Arbroath and Brechin review; and Forfar and Kincardineshire Advertiser'. This included a captioned full length photograph of the young 'Jock' wearing Glengarry, khaki jacket and kilt (issue of 3 September 1915), and the below following article from the issue of 27 August 1915

Quote,

IN THE TRENCHES AT FIFTEEN YEARS OF AGE

- When the members of C Company (Montrose) 5th Black Watch proceeded to France in the end of October last year, the 80 local men included Buglers Alfred Aitken and M'kenzie, both of whom were then only 15 years of age. On Wednesday afternoon Alf. Aitken returned to Montrose, having got a short furlough of seven days. The young ''Veteran'' is the eldest son of Sergeant Andrew Aitken, 61 North Street, of the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, and a grandson of Mr. Robert Aitken, watchmaker. The young soldier has enjoyed capital health, notwithstanding the arduous and rigorous experiences he has gone through; an attack of influenza necessitated a short stay in hospital not long before his return home, but he has now completely recovered and looks fit, and certainly older than his years. He has borne his full share of trench work along with his Company. At the battle of Neuve Chapelle he was in one of the trenches occupied by the reserves. At the engagement of Aubers Ridge, while a number of men were resting on the ground preparatory to advancing to the trenches, his pal Bugler W. M'Callum, Brechin, who was lying beside him, was wounded in the back by shrapnel. M'Callum has now recovered, and is presently in Forfar. During the winter the turn in the trenches lasted three days; now it is six days. Of the 80 local men who proceeded to the front last October, only 40 are now there, the vacant places being filled by drafts sent out from time to time. Reference was made in a recent issue of the ''Review'' to the placing of wooden crosses over the graves of the men of the 5th who had fallen in action. This token of respect to the dead heroes was the work of Sergeant Neil M'Leod, Craigo. Bugler Aitken says that when he left this week two Companies of the 5th Black Watch were in the trenches. The country behind the firing line was looking beautiful, and the excellent cereal crops were about ready to be harvested. The 5th have occupied the same position at the front all the time. Sergeant Tom Valentine, of the 5th, was expected to arrive on furlough in Montrose yesterday (Thursday). Sergeant Andrew Aitken expects to be leaving with the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry for the Mediterranean in a day or two. Bugler M'Kenzie has been at the base at Havre since December

Unquote.

Alfred William Aitken, eldest son of Andrew Aitken (Killed-in-Action on, 2 September 1918, as Company Sergeant Major 14th (Fife & Forfar) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)) & Elizabeth Aitken (nee Paterson) was a native of Montrose, Angus, Scotland, where he was born in 1899. Alfred was educated at Montrose Academy, and was only 15 years of age when on, 1 November 1914, he sailed with his local Territorial Force battalion of the Black Watch for overseas service in France & Flanders with the British Expeditionary Force. On. 2 November 1914, Alfred disembarked at Le Havre, France, with the rest of his battalion, 5/Royal Highlanders (Black Watch). At the time of entering theatre of war 'France', Alfred (regimental number 622) was a Private soldier holding the appointment of 'Bugler'. On 15 March 1916, Alfred's battalion amalgamated with 4/Black Watch, to form 4/5th Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territorial Force, at which time he was renumbered No. 240048, and was still holding the rank of 'Private'. On his return to Montrose, Alfred, took over the family business as watchmaker & jeweller. On 23 January 1925, Alfred married Lavinia Tevendale in, Montrose. The couple had one daughter. In later years, Alfred Aitken, became a local publican, and together with his wife ran the 'Golf Inn', a public house located in Montrose - and still extant in 2021. Alfred William Aitken is recorded as having died in Montrose, Scotland, sometime during 1977

Sold together with a quantity of hard-copy research

A group of considerable regimental, Great War and local 'Montrose' history interest to a 'Teenager Jock'

Condition: GVF

Code: 20881

SOLD


An Old Contemptibles & Old India Hand's 1914 Star 'Aubers Ridge Casualty' medal group of 3 to a 'Jock' : Private Thomas Passmore, 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders

An Old Contemptibles & Old India Hand's 1914 Star 'Aubers Ridge Casualty' medal group of 3 to a 'Jock' : Private Thomas Passmore, 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders

- 1914 Star No clasp (10580 Pte. T. Passmore. 1/ Sea: Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (10580 Pte. T. Passmore. Sea. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (10580 Pte. T. Passmore. Sea. Highrs.)

Wounded-in-Action: Private Thomas Passmore, is confirmed as having been 'Wounded-in-Action' on the Western Front in casualty list released by General Headquarters of British Expeditionary Force on 23 May 1915, & published in the Scotsman Newspaper issue of 9 June 1915 - the long casualty list containing the details of the estimated 494 'All-Ranks' casualties of 1/Seaforth incurred at the battle of Auber's Ridge, 9 May 1915

Note: The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War campaign medal rolls of the Seaforth Highlanders viz:

- 1914 Star: Ref WO 329/2474
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/1645

Thomas Passmore, third son of Joseph Passmore (an Irish born Steam Ship Stoker) & Mary Passmore (nee McGowan) was a native of Bridgeton, Glasgow, Scotland, where he was born circa 1888. Thomas was one of six children in the Passmore family, having four sibling brothers (Henry, Joseph, James & George) and a younger sister, Marjory Passmore. At the time of the 1901 National Census for Scotland, Thomas, was residing with his family, including his parents and all 5 x siblings living at 91 Dale Street, Bridgeton, Glasgow, Scotland. Thomas is recorded as having enlisted enlisted in the British Army on 29 January 1908, and was posted to the Seaforth Highlanders. where at the time of the 1911 National Census for England & Wales, Thomas was serving at, Chamabtta Cantonment, India, on 2 April 1911. Thomas served with the 1st Battalion (Duke of Albany's) Seaforth Highlanders in India prior to the Great War. In September 1/Seaforth embarked at Karachi, with Indian Army battalions of the Dehra Dun Brigade an infantry brigade of the 7th Meerut Division, Indian Corps, and first entered theatre of war 'France' on 12 October 1914, when his battalion arrived at the French Port of Marseilles, where it disembarked. During his service in France & Flanders, Thomas Passmore & 1/Seaforth served throughout with higher formation Dehra Dun Brigade (that included, 6 Jat Light Infantry, 2/2 Gurkha Rifles & 1/9 Gurkha Rifles - and which in December 1914 was augmented with the addition of 1/4th (Ross Highland) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders (Territorial Force)). In December 1915, 1/Seaforth, together with the rest of the Indian Corps, deployed to Mesopotamia1915, to serve against the forces of the Ottoman Turkish Empire. Thomas Passmore is recorded as having been discharged from the British Army on 5 May 1916, due to the severity & debilitating affects of the wounds he received in battle on the Western Front in 1915 (ref Silver War Roll WO 329/3061).

Condition: About VF

Code: 20880

275.00 GBP


A Highland Territorials 1914 Star 'Battle of Neuve Chapelle Casualty' medal group of 3: Private Thomas Porteous, late D Company, 1/4th (Ross Highland) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders (Territorial Force)

A Highland Territorials 1914 Star 'Battle of Neuve Chapelle Casualty' medal group of 3: Private Thomas Porteous, late D Company, 1/4th (Ross Highland) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders (Territorial Force)


- 1914 Star No clasp (2293 Pte. T. Porteous. 1/4 Sea. Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver (2293 Pte. T. Porteous. Sea. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (2293 Pte. T. Porteous. Sea. Highrs.)

Wounded-in-Action: Private Thomas Porteous, is confirmed as having been 'Wounded-in-Action' in France & Flanders serving with the Indian Corps at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, in March 1915, at which time he was serving with 'D' Company of his battalion that was part of Dehra Dun Brigade, 7th Meerut Division, Indian Corps (Reference regimental list 'Ross-shire Territorials' casualties received published in the Scotsman Newspaper issue of 20 March 1915)

Note: The campaign medals all verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War campaign medal rolls of the Seaforth Highlanders viz:

- 1914 Star: Ref WO 329/2474
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/533

Thomas Porteous a pre-war member of the Territorial Force, first entered theatre of war 'France' on 1914, on which date his battalion, 1/4 Seaforth, disembarked at. From December 1914, through to the time of being 'Wounded-in-Action' in March 1915, Thomas and the rest of the Jock's of 1/4 Seaforth were attached to the Dehra Dun Brigade of the 7th Meerut Division, Indian Corps - the other battalions in Dehra Dun Brigade being 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, 6 Jat Light Infantry, 2/2 Gurkha Rifles & 1/9 Gurkha Rifles. Sometime after recovering form his 'Wounds', Thomas was transferred to the Royal Engineers (serving as a Sapper with regimental numbers 255996 & latterly WR 268761) and recorded as taking his discharge from the British Army on 1 November 1918. After demobilization and his return to civilian life in Glasgow, Thomas is recorded as having married Margaret Callan Watret, at, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1923. From 1925 the couple are known to have resided at, 22 Bankhall Street, Govanhill Road, South Side, Glasgow (Army Pension Ledger cards & Glasgow Electoral Registers refer). Thomas Porteous is recorded as having died in Glasgow sometime during 1960

Condition: VF

Code: 20879

275.00 GBP


A most curious Old Contemptible's 1914 Star trio & 'Silver War Badge' group of 4: Private Lionel Goldsby, Army Service Corps late Motor Driver, Headquarters, I Corps, British Expeditionary Force

A most curious Old Contemptible's 1914 Star trio & 'Silver War Badge' group of 4: Private Lionel Goldsby, Army Service Corps late Motor Driver, Headquarters, I Corps, British Expeditionary Force

- 1914 Star. With tailors clasp (MS-3621 Pte. L. Goldsby. A.S.C.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (MS-3621 Pte. L. Goldsby. A.S.C.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (MS-3621 Pte. L. Goldsby. A.S.C.)
- Silver War Badge (154068)

Sold together with:

- Army Service Corps. Cap badge. With GV cypher. In gilding metal & complete with reverse slider as issued

Important: All medals & Silver War Badge verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War campaign medal & Silver War Badge rolls of the Royal Army Service Corps:

- 1914 Star: With clasp & roses (Ref WO 329/2484). First entered theatre of war 'France' on 15 September 1914 & discharged 17 August 1916

- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/2041

- Silver War Badge: Badge No 154068 awarded (Ref WO 329/3209)

Note: The 'Curious; aspect of this medal recipient (a qualified 'Motor Driver') was a civilian and 36 years of age, at time of enlistment, on, 3 September 1914 - yet, only '12 days' later he was serving overseas, in theatre of war France, at Headquarters I Corps, British Expeditionary Force, as a Driver with Army Service Corps. Lionel's service papers (extant and held at the National Archives) show that the only military service he claimed prior to 1914, was 3 x years with 3rd Volunteer Battalion Warwickshire Regiment from which unit he had been discharged in 1897! Presumably, considering his trade as a 'Motor Driver', Lionel was considered to have a specialist skill urgently needed in the Army Service Corps and hence the accelerated - and highly unusual - 12 days duration between enlistment and service in theatre of war France in 1914

Comment: Possibly, Lionel was a civilian 'chauffeur' to a General or other senior ranking staff officer who facilitated Lionel's 'accelerated' enlistment and overseas posting

Lionel Goldsby is confirmed to entitlement of 'Clasp and Rosettes' and Silver War Badge and is additionally noted as serving with HQ 1st Corps A.S.C. in 1914

Lionel Goldsby, only son of John Goldsby (a Hairdresser) and Ann Goldsby (nee Golsby) was a native of, Wokingham, Berkshire, England, where he was born on, 1 August 1879. Lionel was one of two children in the Goldsby family, he was the only boy and youngest child, with an elder sibling sister (Gertrude Goldsby). The Goldsby family re-located to Warwickshire sometime prior to 1891, as by time of the 1891 National Census for England and Wales, Lionel is recorded as residing at, Market Street, St Mary, Warwick, Warwickshire. Lionel later served as a volunteer soldier in his local volunteer unit, viz 3rd Volunteer Battalion Warwickshire Regiment, for 3 years between 1896-1897. By the time of the 1901 Census, Lionel was living with his widowed mother and sister, and residing at 3, Priory Road, Warwick, Warwickshire, at which time he was described as employed as a 'Photographic Dry Plater Examiner & Cutter'. On, 13 May 1907, Lionel married, Charlotte Maud Bargh, and by now described as a 'Motor Driver', was residing at, 20 Guy Street, Warwick, Warwickshire. Sometime before 1911, Lionel and relocated to London, and at the time of the National Census for England and Wales in 1911, Lionel is shown as employed as a 'Motor Car Driver' and living with his wife and son (Frank, born Warwick, 1908) at, 35 Sulgrave Road, Shepherd's Bush, Hammersmith, London. Lionel - a Motor Driver - enlisted in the British Army, at, London, on, 3 September 1914‚Äč - and only 12 days later was serving as a Motor Driver at Headquarters I Corps, British Expeditionary Force, France. Lionel continued to serve in France through to, 14 January 1916. On return to the United Kingdom, Lionel served through to 17 August 1916, on which date he took his final discharge form the British Army. Latterly Lionel had bene employed as a 'Driver' with the Army Service Corps at Bulford Camp. In 1939, Lionel is recorded in the National Register for England & Wales, shown employed as a 'Motor Card Driver & Mechanic' and residing with his wife at, 24 Pennard Road, Shepherd's Bush, Hammersmith, London. Lionel Goldsby is recorded as having died in Wandsworth, London, England, sometime during the last quarter of 1960

The medals and SWB professionally 'Court-Mounted- by Spink & Son of London. The reverse of the mounting pin retaining the original long stout hinged pin & clasp fittings

A Great War medal group that is enhanced by the professional medal mounting

Condition: GVF

Code: 20878

195.00 GBP


An 'Arbroath' Jock's 1914 Star & Territorial Efficiency Medal group of 4: Private George Ritchie, No 3 Company', 4/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territoral Army, late 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Royal Highlanders

An 'Arbroath' Jock's 1914 Star & Territorial Efficiency Medal group of 4: Private George Ritchie, No 3 Company', 4/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territoral Army, late 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Royal Highlanders

- 1914 Star. With silver rose (1721 Pte. Ritchie. 1/ 5 R. Highrs:)
- British War Medal. Silver (1721 Pte. G. Ritchie. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (1721 Pte. G. Ritchie. R. Highrs.)
- Territorial Efficiency Medal. GV (2746794 Pte. G .Ritchie. 4-5 Black Watch.)

Note: The 1914 Star sans forename initial - and exactly as officially issued

Important: All medals verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War campaign medal rolls of the 5th Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) and Army Order, viz:

- 1914 Star. No clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/1357
- Territorial Efficiency Medal: Ref Army Order 59 of 1924

The name 'G or George, Ritchie' is a unique name on the 1914 Star medal roll of the 5th Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

Reference numerous issues of the 'Montrose, Arbroath and Brechin Review; and Forfar and Kincardineshire Advertiser'. Private George Ritchie is shown in all issues as serving with 1/5th Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) with the same address against his name, viz , 30 Park Street, Arbroath, Angus, Scotland

George Ritchie, was a native of Arbroath, Scotland, where he was born on 26 December 1894. George was 19 years of age when on, 1 November 1914, he embarked with his local Territorial Force battalion of the Black Watch for overseas service in France & Flanders with the British Expeditionary Force. On. 2 November 1914, George disembarked at Le Havre, France, with the rest of his battalion, 5/Royal Highlanders (Black Watch). At the time of entering theatre of war 'France', George (regimental number 1721) held the rank of Private. George Ritchie subsequently served on the 'Western Front' throughout the Great War. On 15 March 1916, George's battalion amalgamated with 4/Black Watch, to form 4/5th Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territorial Force, at which time he was renumbered No. 268114. Sometime post 1920, George Ritchie, took his final discharge from the British Army, at which time he had been renumbered No. 2746794, which was in the unique block of Army Numbers allocated to the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) in 1920

It is thought that George Ritchie served as a member of the Arbroath Fire Brigade in civilian life

The medals mounted as worn by the recipient in the swing-style. The reverse of the mounting bar retaining the long hinged pin and clasp fittings

Sold together with some hard-copy copied research

Condition: About GVF

Code: 20877

Reserved


A 'Sapper's Great War veterans medal group of 4 including recipient's Silver War Badge, insignia & ephemera: Sapper Walter Sheldon Smith, 565 Wiltshire Army Troop Company (late 1/1 Wiltshire Fortress Company), Royal Engineers

A 'Sapper's Great War veterans medal group of 4 including recipient's Silver War Badge, insignia & ephemera: Sapper Walter Sheldon Smith, 565 Wiltshire Army Troop Company (late 1/1 Wiltshire Fortress Company), Royal Engineers

- 1914-15 Star (227 Spr. W.S. Smith R.E.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (227 Spr. W.S. Smith R.E.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (227 Spr. W.S. Smith R.E.)
- Silver War Badge (No. 18079). Complete with fittings as issued

Sold together with:

- Royal Engineers. Cap badge. GV cypher with King's Crown
- Princess Mary 1914 Christmas Fund. Christmas Card

France 1915: Sapper Walter Sheldon Smith 1/1 Wiltshire Fortress Company Royal Engineers first entered theatre of war France, when he disembarked at France on 21 January 1915 (medal roll refers). He took his discharge from the British Army on 24 September 1915. He is recorded on 'Casualty Lists' in France during 1915, being at No.11 General Hospital on date 9 June 1915 (Ref Wo 363 - First World War Service Records 'Burnt Documents')

Note: The campaign medals and Silver War Badge all verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War medal & SWB rolls of the Royal Engineers viz:

- 1914-15 Star Star: Ref WO 329/2590
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/519
- Silver War Badge: Ref WO 329/3026 . Awarded SWB No. 18079

Orange 'Walter' Sheldon Smith, son of John Orange Smith (a Brass Finisher at Railway Works Locomotive ) & Ellen Lucy Smith (nee Yapp) was a native of, Lambeth, England, where he was born on 11 January 1896. Unusually 'Walter's' first given name is variously recorded as 'Orange' - but he chose not use it, and instead used the name 'Walter' as he preferred throughout his adult life. A single child, Walter, and his parents had relocated to Swindon, Wiltshire, sometime after 1901, as by the time of the 1911 National Census for England 7 Wales, the family is recorded a living at, 5 Fairview, Swindon, Wiltshire - the family residence in continuous use through to Walter's death in 1966. In 1911, Walters father John Orange Smith is still recorded as employed as a 'Brass Finisher Locomotive' but with added notation to show he was employed with the Great Western Railway. 'Walter' Shedlon Smith, had no siblings, and was an only child. At the time of the 1911 Census, Walter was recorded as as still being at school, but very shortly after the Census he left shool, and took up employment - like his father before him - with the Great Western Railway, where on 2 May 1911, he joined the GWR as an 'Office Boy' working in the 'Locomotive' operations department. Presumably, Walter was still working with the Great Western Railways, when on 5 September 1914, he enlisted in the (Territorial Force) of the British Army, being posted to his local TF unit, 'Wiltshire Fortress Company' Royal Engineers - which drew heavily on the manpower of employees of the Great Western Railway. Walter's service with the Wiltshire Fortress Company Royal Engineers, can be gleaned form the below summary of services of the Wiltshire Fortress Company , between 1914-1915:

On the outbreak of war in August 1914, the fortress engineers moved to their war stations in the coastal defences. The Wiltshire Company was undergoing its annual training at Fort Purbrook, Portsmouth, and went straight from there to Weymouth, where along with the Dorset company and work details from infantry battalions, it worked on completing the Portland defences. The Portland defence works were completed by November 1914, and the men then underwent a month of strenuous training, including heavy bridge building and constructing trenches at night. The unit then embarked aboard the SS Blackwell and arrived at Le Havre on 20 January 1915, the next day disembarking its men, including Walter Sheldon Smith, to join the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on the Western Front

The company first worked on a large defensive scheme for Saint-Omer in the rear area, then in April moved up to St Eloi in the Ypres Salient, where it constructed a trench along the Comines Canal and bored tunnels to serve as a covered way across the canal. This was done in hip-deep water and under constant rifle and machine-gun fire, and the company suffered its first casualties. Next the 1/1st Wilts was camped at Brielen, building huts along the Yser Canal to accommodate newly-arriving divisions, but these huts came under German artillery fire and were destroyed. The company also repaired bridges over the canal, suffering casualties from the artillery fire. Eventually, having suffered 50 per cent casualties, the company was sent for rest to Danoutre, near Kemmel. Here part of the company spent June worked on defences while the railway machinists operated a sawmill and engineering works at Bailleul

Walter is recorded on 'Casualty Lists' in France during 1915, being at No.11 General Hospital on date 9 June 1915 (Ref Wo 363 - First World War Service Records 'Burnt Documents'). He subsequently took his final discharge from the British Army on 24 September 1915, with a disability incurred while on active service in France, that had rendered him 'No longer physically fit for War Serrvice'. After his Military Service in France during the Great War, Walter returned to, Swindon, Wiltshire, England, where he was employed as a 'Commercial Traveller'. In the first quarter of 1923, he married Gladys Ellen Alice Yapp, at Swindon, Wiltshire. The 1939 National Register for England & Wales shows Walter described as a 'Commercial Traveller Textile Trade' residing with his wife and widowed mother, at the family residence located at, 5 Fair View, Swindon, Wiltshire, England. His entry in the 939 National Register having the additional annotation / remarks 'Late member Royal Engineers (T.F.). Disabled during War 1914-18, Wilts (227)'. Walter Sheldon Smith is recorded as having died at, Princess Margaret Hospital, Swindon, Wiltshire, on 9 June 1966, his estate passing to his widowed wife Gladys, who succeeded him

The medals mounted as-worn in the swing style mounted from their original long lengths of silk moire ribands - these bright - the mounting bar retaining the long hinged pin and clasp, and as worn by the recipient

A very good 'Wiltshire Fortress Company' Royal Engineers (Territorial Force) veterans grouping - that has never been mucked around with!

Condition: GVF

Code: 20876

SOLD


A 'Jock's' Great War campaign & long service group of 4 to a Gallipoli veteran: Serjeant Robert Paterson, 1/6 Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Territorial Force)

A 'Jock's' Great War campaign & long service group of 4 to a Gallipoli veteran: Serjeant Robert Paterson, 1/6 Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Territorial Force)

- 1914-15 Star (61 Sjt. R. Paterson. High. L.I.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue
- Interallied Victory Medal (61 Sjt. R. Paterson. H.L.I.)
- Territorial Force Efficiency Medal (240004 Sjt R Paterson. 6/High. L.I)

Sold together with a fine postcard portrait of Sergeant Paterson in kilted field service order of 1/6 H.L.I. - one of only 2 x battalions of the H.L.I. (the other was 9/H.L.I) that were kilted

Regimental number: The low two digit regimental number '61' shows that the recipient was an original muster on the formation of the 6th Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Territorial Force) when it was formed in 1908

Note: Serjeant Paterson served with 1/6th Battalion H.L.I. at Gallipoli during the Dardanelles campaign of 1915, where he served from 2 July 1915

Important: All campaign and long service medals verified as entitled per the below cited medal rolls and authorities:

- 1914-15 Star Star: Ref WO 329/2794
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/1642
- Territorial Force Efficiency Medal: Ref Army Order 369 of 1 August 1920

The War Service of 1/6th (City of Glasgow) Battalion Highland Light Infantry (Territorial Force) is summarised below:

August 1914: Glasgow. Part of HLI Brigade in Lowland Division.
11 May 1915: Dunfermline. Formation became 157th Brigade in 52nd (Lowland) Division.
26 May 1915: Sailed from Devonport for Gallipoli, landing at Cape Helles on 2 July.
8 January 1916: Evacuated from Gallipoli to Mudros and arrived Egypt in February.
11 April 1918: Division left Egypt, battalion arrived Marseilles 17 April for service on Western Front

During the Great War, the much travelled 1/6 H.L.I.,served in Gallipoli (1915), Egypt & Palestine (1916-1918) and France & Belgium (1918)

Sold together with some copied research

Condition: Silver medals toned about GV

Code: 20875

SOLD


A Black Watch casualty medal pair for the loss of the S.S. Aragon: Private Andrew Bell 14th (Fife and Forfar Yeomanry) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), late 1/6th (Perthshire) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territorial Force

A Black Watch casualty medal pair for the loss of the S.S. Aragon: Private Andrew Bell 14th (Fife and Forfar Yeomanry) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), late 1/6th (Perthshire) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territorial Force

- British War Medal. Silver issue (3902 Pte. A. Bell. R. Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (3902 Pte. A. Bell. R. Highrs.)

Important: Private Alexander Bell confirmed 'Killed-in-Action' at the sinking of the S.S. Aragon, sunk by the German U-Boat 34, on 30 December 1917

Note: Both medals verified as entitled per the respective regimental Great War campaign medal rolls of the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) viz:

- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref 329/1356

Andrew Bell, son of Andrew Bell & Mary Bell, was a native of Perth, Scotland, where he was born on 26 December 1894. Alexander was 19 years of age when he first entered theatre of war 'France' in 1916, where he served with the1/6th (Perthshire) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) Territorial Force, under higher command of 51st Highland Division. The Scotsman newspaper issue of 4 September 1916, records that No. 3902 Private A. Bell (Perth) had been 'Wounded-in-Action' while serving with the Black Watch, in France & Flanders. Private Bell was subsequently transferred to the 14th (Fife and Forfar Yeomanry) Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) that had been formed at Ismilia, in Egypt, on 21 December 1916, from the dismounted troops of the 1st Fife & Forfar Yeomanry. At the time of joining `14/BW Andrew was assigned a new regimental number, viz No. 203525

Andrew Bell was one of only a handful of Black Watch soldiers to have been killed-in-action when the German U-Boat 34 sunk the transport ship S.S. Aragon on 30 December 1917. Private Bell's life and sacrifice is commemorated in perpetuity by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission on the Chatby Memorial located at Alexandria, Egypt
Of those aboard Aragon, 610 were killed including Captain Bateman, 19 of his crew, and six of the VADs. Hundreds of troops were killed. One was Ernest Horlock, a Royal Field Artillery Battery Sergeant Major who had received the VC for "conspicuous gallantry" shown on the Western Front in 1914. Another 25 of those killed were new recruits to the 5th Battalion the Bedfordshire Regiment. Soldiers killed in the sinking are among those commemorated by the Chatby Memorial in the Chatby district of eastern Alexandria

Sold together with original registered envelope containing medals addressed to recipients Nex-of-Kin, together with some copied research

Condition: About EF

Code: 20874

SOLD


A Scottish 'Digger's' Great War casualty medal pair: Corporal Thomas McGillivary Cran, 9th Light Trench Mortar Battery, Australian Imperial Force

A Scottish 'Digger's' Great War casualty medal pair: Corporal Thomas McGillivary Cran, 9th Light Trench Mortar Battery, Australian Imperial Force

- British War Medal. Silver issue (734 Cpl. T. Mc G. Cran 9 L.T.M.B. A.I.F.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (734 Cpl. T. M. Cran 9 -L.T.M.B. A.I.F.)

Sold together with:

- Australian Imperial Force. Cap badge. Kings Crown, complete with slider suspension as issued

- Australia. Blackened brass shoulder title. Complete with 2 x copper loop fittings as issued

Important: Corporal Thomas Cran is recorded as having 'Died Of Wounds' at Ploegstreet Wood, Belgium, on 12 June 1917

Note: Both medals confirmed as the recipients full medal entitlement for the Great War (recipients extant service papers held by the Australian National Archives refer)

Thomas McGillivary Cran, son of John Cran (a Farmer) and Elizabeth Cran (nee McGillivary) was a native of, Strathdon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, where he was born on 28 January 1885. His father farmed at Farmton, Glenkindie, Strathdon. Prior to the Great War, Thomas had migrated to Australia. Thomas attested for service with the 36th Battalion Australian Imperial Force on 8 March 1916 at West Maitland New South Wales, giving his age as 30 and his profession as 'Engine Driver'. After a period of training in Australia and later in England he embarked for France in November of that year, and was assigned to the 9th Light Trench Mortar Battery from 8 May 1917. Promoted Temporary Corporal a day later, sadly he was not to enjoy his new unit or step up in rank for long as on 2 June 1917 he was wounded in action and died of his injuries on 12 June - an annotation in his record notes: 'Died of wounds received accidentally owing to explosion of ammunition dump at Ploegsteert Wood'. A parcel of personal effects was forwarded to his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Cran, of Clifton Road, Aberdeen, Scotland.

The life and supreme sacrifice of Thomas Cran, who Died-of-Wounds died during the Great War, is perpetuated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, at the Boulogne Easter Cemetery, Boulogne, France, where his bodily remains lie buried. He is also commemorated on the Clatt War Memorial 1914-1919, located at Clatt, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. This latter rural memorial listing 7 x soldiers, Thomas being the only one who served with the dominion forces

For those with a particular interest in the 'Fallen' of the Great War who hailed from the, Strathdon area, of, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, see the monumental web-site for the Kennethmont, Gartly, Rhyne & Kearn and Clatt war memorials at;

- www.kinnethmont.co.uk

Condition: Medals are EF

Code: 20873

225.00 GBP


A 'Bostonian' Casualty of the '100 Days Offensive' medal group of 3 including the recipient's numbered Silver War Badge: Private Frank Ewart Grocock, 6th Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment, late 8th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment

A 'Bostonian' Casualty of the '100 Days Offensive' medal group of 3 including the recipient's numbered Silver War Badge: Private Frank Ewart Grocock, 6th Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment, late 8th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment

- British War Medal. Silver issue (37136 Pte. F. E. Grocock. E. York. R.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (37136 Pte. F. E. Grocock. E. York. R.)
- Silver War Badge (B167259)

Wounded-in-Action: Private Frank Grocock, is confirmed as having been 'Wounded-in-Action' by Gunshot & Shrapnel Wound on 24 September 1918, during the '100 Days Offensive' while serving with 6th Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment

Note: The campaign medals and Silver War Badge all verified as entitled per the respective medal and silver war badge rolls, viz:

- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1288
- Silver War Badge: Ref WO 329/3023. Awarded B167259

Frank Ewart Grocock, second son of Richard Henry Grocock (Baker & Confectioner) & Elizabeth Grocock (nee Peck) was a native of, Boston, Linolnshire, England, where he was born on 2 November 1898. Frank was one of seven children in the Grocock family, having two sibling brothers (elder brother, William Henry - Killed in Action on 2 September 1915, while serving with 4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment - & younger brother, Frederick John), and four sisters (elder sisters, Gertrude, Emily & Jessie - - which latter served overseas during the Great War with Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps - & younger sister Doris). At the time of the 1911 National Census for England & Wales, Frank, was residing with his family, including his widowed mother (head of house) and 5 x siblings, living at, 25 Wormgate, Boston, Lincolnshire, England, at which time he was described as being a 'Scholar'. Frank enlisted into the British Army on, 9 October 1916, on which date he was posted to the East Yorkshire Regiment. Thomas first entered theatre of war 'France', and served on the 'Western Front' with 8th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment. Frank was subsequently transferred to 6th Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment (holding regimental number 23521), ijn which unit, on, 24 September 1918, during the battles of the '100 Dyas Offensive', Frank was recorded as being 'Wounded in Action' with Gunshot & Shrapnel Wounds (GSW). On 24 September 1918, Frank, by then badly wounded (his GSW were classified as, IV / 4 'Penetrating Wounds to the Chest') was admitted to No 3 Casualty Clearance Station, then located at Beaulencourt, France (September to October 1918). The severity of Frank's wounds can be measured by the subsequent 'duration' of his treatment which is recorded as '67 Days' (ref MH106, War Office: First World War Representative Medical Records of Servicemen). On 10 April 1919, due to the debilitating affects of his GSW Wounds, Frank Grocock was found to be 'Medically Unfit' for further military service', and on that date was discharged from the British Army. At the time of his discharge Frank was recorded as being 20 years of age.

6/Dorsets & 100 Days Offensive: During the 100 Dyas Offensive of 1918, 6th Dorsets fought at the Battles of Amiens, Albert, Havrincourt, Epehy and Cambrai before taking part in the British pursuit of the German Army to the Selle.They then fought in the Battles of the Selle and the Sambre. The Armistice found the Division south east of Maubeuge and, after a short spell west of Le Cateau, on 6th December they moved back to near Amiens and went to billets around Hallencourt. Demobilisation began in January 1919. An estimated 1000 'All-Ranks' of the battalion were lost during the Great War, of which almost half were incurred in the 1918 with exceptionally high losses in the final advances of the last three months of the conflict

After the Great War, Frank Ewart Grocock, relocated to Nottingham, England, where in April 1939, described as a 'Carpenter & Joiner' , he is recorded as living with his wife Edith Grocock (nee Rose) and daughter Edith J. Grocock (22 years of age) at the family residence located at, 51 Hereford Road, Nottingham. At the advanced age of 93 years, Frank Grocock, is recorded as having died at, Stoke House Nursing Home, 24-26 Stoke Lane, Gedling, Nottingham, England, on, 24 April 1992

The Silver War Badge was a proudly worn item of insignia, as evinced by the badge having a replacement pin & clasp, exactly as worn by the recipient

Condition: VF

Code: 20872

SOLD


Previous page Next page