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Russia (Federation): Jubilee Medal for 50 Years of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941–1945' (1945-1995). Instituted 1995

Russia (Federation): Jubilee Medal for 50 Years of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941–1945' (1945-1995). Instituted 1995

Medal fitted with five sided riband mounting plate that retains the original hinged pin and clasp fittings on the reverse

Condition: GVF

Code: 20154

12.00 GBP


A positively attributed miniature medal group of 7 to a Naval Officer recommended by 'His Majesty's Indian Ministers': Commander Leonard George Brooks, M.B.E., Royal Navy

A positively attributed miniature medal group of 7 to a Naval Officer recommended by 'His Majesty's Indian Ministers': Commander Leonard George Brooks, M.B.E., Royal Navy

- Order of the British Empire (Mily) Members Badge. Type II
- The 1939-45 Star
- The Atlantic Star
- The Africa Star
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- India: Independence Medal

Sold together with;

- Companion miniature medal riband bar, with pin & clasp fittings

Important: The award of the M.B.E. published in the Third Supplement issue of the London Gazette dated 3 June 1949, and a scarce instance of a 'Pre Republic era 'India Service' award to Naval Officer being recommended for an honour on the advice of His Majesty's 'Indian Ministers'

Quote,

The KING has been graciously pleased, on the occasion of the Celebration of His Majesty's Birthday, and on the advice of His Majesty's Indian Ministers, to give orders for the following appointment to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire;-

To be an Ordinary Member of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order :

— Acting Instructor Lieutenant-Commander Leonard George BROOKS, Royal Navy

Unquote.

India Independence Medal: The award of the medal Brooks is verified in the respective Royal Navy medal roll for this medal vide ADM 171/61. Only 78 x India Independence Medals issued to Officers and Ratings of the Royal Navy. The only 'Brooks' on the medal roll being the Instructor-Commander L.G. Brooks, who was sent his medal on 25 August 1952

Leonard George Brooks served a long career with the Royal Navy. The Royal Navy List records him as a Schoolmaster in 1934. The 1946 Naval List show him recorded him as 'Acting Headmaster Lieutenant / Lent to Royal Indian Navy), while the 1948 Royal Navy List show him listed under 'Naval Forces of the Dominions (India)' as 'Instructor Lieutenant / Acting Lieutenant Commander Acting Instructor Commander'. The 1962 Navy List shows him still serving in the Royal Navy, by which time he held the appointment 'Instructor Commander' with seniority from 31 December 1955

The medals mounted in the swing-style as originally worn by the recipient. The reverse of the mounting brooch retaining the long hinged pin and clasp fittings

See Code 20887 on the website for the recipients full-size medals, that are being sold separately

A very scarce combination of medals to a Royal Navy Officer, that includes an officially named / impressed India Independence Medal of which only 78 x medals were issued to the Royal Navy

Important: This sale is for the miniature medals and miniature riband bar only - the images here attached of the recipients full-size medals are for reference / illustrative purposes only (we can, gratis. supply the images only as email attachments to the buyer)

Condition: VF

Code: 20888

125.00 GBP


Belgium: Prisoner of War Medal 1940-1945 (Medaille du Prisonnier de Guerre 1940-1945 / Krijgsgevangenenmedaille 1940-1945)

Belgium: Prisoner of War Medal 1940-1945 (Medaille du Prisonnier de Guerre 1940-1945 / Krijgsgevangenenmedaille 1940-1945)

This medal was established by Royal Decree on 20 October 1947, for award to all members of the Belgian Armed Forces who were made Prisoner of War and interred by the enemy during the Second World War

The riband fitted with a two-pronged mounting pin, or 'epingle' in the Belgian style

Condition: EF

Code: 18296

28.00 GBP


British India: Provincial Best Shot Medal. For 'Burma' Province (1902-03, Captn A.H. Morgan, Upper Burmah Vol. Rifles, Score 74

British India: Provincial Best Shot Medal. For 'Burma' Province (1902-03, Captn A.H. Morgan, Upper Burmah Vol. Rifles, Score 74

Metal: Silver. Not hallmarked

Dimension: Approx 37mm

Weight: Approx 34g

Suspension: Ball with silver ring, attached to integral ornate scroll clasp, this with embossed name of province 'Burma' with roller bar to reverse for riband attachment.

Obverse: Die-struck medal with raised wreath sprays of laurel sprays to sides. In centre a large five pointed star, with Imperial Crown on top, below and centre a shield with raised legend 'The / Provincial Medal / awarded / to the / best shot / among the / Volunteers / in the / Province

Reverse: Laurel wreath sprays, and embossed legend 'Won By', on top the engraved dates 1892-1893, and engraved below on 3 x lines 'Captn A.H. Morgan / Upper Burmah Vol Rifles / Score 74)

Arthur Henry Morgan, son of & William Thomas Morgan (Studio Artist & Painter) & Harriet Morgan (nee Handcock) was a native of Greenwich, London, England, where he was born on 31 May 1865 (& where baptised on 23 July 1865). By the time of the National Census for England & Wales in 1881, Thomas a 'Scholar' is recorded as just one of 8 x children who were living in the family home located at, 75 South Street, Greenwich. Thomas had 2 x sibling brothers viz lder brother Ernest and younger brother Herbert, and 5 x younger sibling sisters viz (Ada, Emily, Edith, Grace & Ethel). Arthur became an Engineer, and from 1887, was resident overseas in Upper Burma On 28 May 1891, while Arthur was resident at the Kyat-Pyin, Ruby Mines District, Burma, a proposal was submitted (and approved) for him to become an Associate of the Chartered Institute of Engineers in the United Kingdom. The proposal submitted by his former boss. Mr. W. S. Lockhart, M.Int.C.E., below:

Quote,

He served an apprenticeship (1882-'86) in the Workshops of the Telegraph Construction & Maintenance Company Ltd, at first under the Manager, Mr. H. Clifford, when he had experience in general & marine machine work, and subsequently for two years under Mr J.E.H. Gordon, M.Inst. C.E., employed on the Electric-Light Instalations, undertaken by the firm - the principal being that of the Great Western Ry Terminus at Paddington; and then, for a short time, worked as an improver at the Thames Iron Works Co. Ltd., & afterwards for Messrs Maudslay Sons & Field aboard H.M.S. 'Benbow'. For a few months in 1887, he was engaged under Mr. W. H. Lucas, Assoc. M.Inst.C.E.; and since September '87, has been Assistant Resident Engineer at the Burma Ruby Mines, - at first under Mr. W. S, Lockhart, M.Inst.C.E., and afterwards under Major. Kunhard, R.E., Assoc. Inst.C.E., the present Engineer-in-Chief. During this time he has had charge of engineering works of a varied character, including surveying, the construction of roads, extensive tunnelling, the erection of workshops, and large machinery, of tramways, rope-ways, gem-washing machines, etc.

Unquote,

Arthur Morgan was an early Pioneer of the famous Upper Burma 'Ruby Mines' at Mogok, and arrived in Burma at the very start of British mining for Rubies in Upper Burma;

Quote,

In 1889 the Ruby Mine Company Syndicate Limited was formed, capitalized by numerous English bankers and industrialists. It was handled by the management firm of Streeter & Company in London. According to agreement, this company paid the British Crown 40,000 rupees yearly plus one-sixth of all profits accumulated. Barrington Brow, M.P., was sent from England to negotiate the first five-year contract, which expired in 1895. Scientific mining began and several geologists were sent to survey the Mogok area. They reported that the bulk of the gem-bearing gravel was located in the center of town where most of the natives lived. The company negotiated with the owners of these properties and bought all the huts located in the surveyed gem-bearing bed. The natives were given new homes or, where possible, old homes were moved to new localities hacked out of the nearby jungles. These moves presented no problem since the natives were well compensated and were promised employment. Mining began immediately after the people were moved. Electricity was brought to Mogok with the construction of a power plant. Digging began and several millions of dollars of rubies, sapphires, spinels and other gems were mined. A single ruby of fabulous size reportedly worth one million dollars, was discovered. Profits were good under the first contract. The company and townspeople were happy with the new way of life. The first contract had expired and in 1896 the company negotiated again with the British Government and agreed to pay a tax of 3,150,000 kyats, about 800,000 dollars, plus one-fifth of the total profits for 14 years. This contract included all the mines within a radius of 10 miles of Mogok. These were the boom days with everyone working and much money in circulation

Unquote.

A keen Volunteer, and member of the Upper Burma Volunteer Rifles. He had been promoted to Captain in the corps in 1901. Captain Morgan was a qualified crack-shot as evinced by the award of the annually contested Provincial Best Medal for Burma that he won during the Competition Year 1902-1903

Arthur not only pioneered the Ruby mining industry in Mogok, Upper Burma, but he became an international expert on Ruby gems, writing extensively on the subject viz;

- ' Atlay, F. and Morgan, A.H. (1905) The Burma Ruby Mines. London, The Burma Ruby Mines, Limited, pamphlet with map and photos.

- Morgan A.H. (1904) The Ruby mines of Burma (Mining Journal, Vol. 16, p. 4)

Arthur Henry Morgan, Engineer, lived and worked in Burma almost 45 years, and only left the country in 1935 due to ill-health. He is recorded as having died in Kent, England, on 2 December 1936. At the time of his death he was of 71 years of age, and left behind a daughter, Mrs Johnson of Mill House, Brasted, Kent, England. His estate value at the time of his death was GBP 67,476 - a 'very considerable' amount for 1936

A rare Burma Volunteers Medal - and the only Provincial Best Shot Medal that we have sighted with top bar 'Burma' - a very desirable item to a famous Pioneer Engineer in the history of the world-famous Ruby Mines of 'Upper Burma'

Condition: Suspension roller A/F otherwise about GVF

Code: 20630

SOLD


A rare recommended by 'His Majesty's Indian Ministers' Naval Instructors M.B.E., medal group of 7: Commander Leonard George Brooks, M.B.E., Royal Navy

A rare recommended by 'His Majesty's Indian Ministers' Naval Instructors M.B.E., medal group of 7: Commander Leonard George Brooks, M.B.E., Royal Navy

- Order of the British Empire (Mily) Members Badge. Type II
- The 1939-45 Star
- The Atlantic Star
- The Africa Star
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- India: Independence Medal (A/Instr. Lt.-Comdr. R. G. Brooks, R.N.)

Note: The Independence Medal with forename letter 'R' (sic), and exactly as issued officially impressed

Important: The award of the M.B.E. published in the Third Supplement issue of the London Gazette dated 3 June 1949, and a scarce instance of a 'Pre Republic era 'India Service' award to Naval Officer being recommended for an honour on the advice of His Majesty's 'Indian Ministers'

Quote,

The KING has been graciously pleased, on the occasion of the Celebration of His Majesty's Birthday, and on the advice of His Majesty's Indian Ministers, to give orders for the following appointment to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire;-

To be an Ordinary Member of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order :

— Acting Instructor Lieutenant-Commander Leonard George BROOKS, Royal Navy

Unquote.

India Independence Medal: The award of the medal Brooks is verified in the respective Royal Navy medal roll for this medal vide ADM 171/61. Only 78 x India Independence Medals issued to Officers and Ratings of the Royal Navy. The only 'Brooks' on the medal roll being the Instructor-Commander L.G. Brooks, who was sent his medal on 25 August 1952

Leonard George Brooks served a long career with the Royal Navy. The Royal Navy List records him as a Schoolmaster in 1934. The 1946 Naval List show him recorded him as 'Acting Headmaster Lieutenant / Lent to Royal Indian Navy), while the 1948 Royal Navy List show him listed under 'Naval Forces of the Dominions (India)' as 'Instructor Lieutenant / Acting Lieutenant Commander Acting Instructor Commander'. The 1962 Navy List shows him still serving in the Royal Navy, by which time he held the appointment 'Instructor Commander' with seniority from 31 December 1955

The medals mounted in the swing-style as originally worn by the recipient. The reverse of the mounting brooch retaining the long hinged pin and clasp fittings, and fitted with a swathe of 'Navy Blue' serge cloth backing, as typically worn by Naval recipients

See Code 20888 on the website for the recipients companion miniature medal group, including his miniature dress riband bar, that are being sold separately

A very scarce combination of medals to a Royal Navy Officer, that includes an officially named / impressed India Independence Medal of which only 78 x medals were issued to the Royal Navy

Condition: VF

Code: 20887

695.00 GBP


An impressive multi-medal meritorious & long service medal group of 10: Staff Sergeant George Robert Price, B.E.M., Wessex Regiment, late Hampshire Regiment, Royal Military Police & Dorsetshire Regiment

An impressive multi-medal meritorious & long service medal group of 10: Staff Sergeant George Robert Price, B.E.M., Wessex Regiment, late Hampshire Regiment, Royal Military Police & Dorsetshire Regiment

- British Empire Medal (Military Division) EIIR issue
- The 1939-45 Star
- The Africa Star. With clasp '1st Army'
- The Italy Star
- Defence Medal
- War Medal
- GSM 1918. EIIR 'Cyprus' (5725069 W.O.Cl.2. G. R. Price R.M.P.)
- Mily MSM. EIIR 2nd type (5725069 S. Sgt. G. R. Price. R.M.P.)
- Mily LS&GC. EIIR 'Regular Army' (5725069 S. Sjt. G. R. Price R.M.P.)
- Efficiency. EIIR 'T. & A.V.R.' (23869591 Pte. G. R. Price, B.E.M., Wessex)

Note: The B.E.M. with skimmed edge

Important: The award of the British Empire Medal (Military Division) was published in the Supplement to the London Gazette issue of 1 January 1967. The official recommendation is quoted below:

Quote,

Sergeant PRICE has given in excess of 32 years' service to H.M. Forces, serving continuously as a Regular Soldier from 1934 to 1961, of which time half was served in overseas theatres both on active service and in peace.

His first 5 years of Colour Service was with the Dorset Regiment, and the latter 22 years with the Corps of Military Police. Immediately following his Colour service, he joined the Territorial Battalion of the Royal Hampshire Regiment, where he has served to date.

From his personal records it is quite obvious that for the whole of his service, Sergeant PRICE has set the highest standards - certainly well above the average, that is expected of his rank.

To his present dual roll with this Battalion as civilian Chief Clerk by day and Orderly Room Sergeant in his T.A. duties, he brings a wealth of knowledge, great forbearance, patience, and devotion of time and personal conscientiousness which exceeds by far, that normally expected of even the most dutiful of persons.

It is thought that few members of H.M. Forces could merit greater consideration for an award.

Unquote.

Provenance: Dix Noonan Webb 6 December 2006, Lot 969 (hammer price of GBP 780), when the medals were sold as a group of 9, erroneously described and without a BEM!

George Robert Price , only son of George William Price (a Baker) and Caroline May Price (nee Primmer) was a native of, Southampton, Hampshire, England, where he was born on 18 November 1916. George was one of four children in the Price family, he was the only boy and the youngest child, with 3 x sibling sisters (Ivy Price, Emily Price & Lilian Price). George's father died in 1918. At the age of 18 years, George joined the British Army in 1934 being posted to the Dorset Regiment, with which infantry regiment he served through to 1939, subsequently transferring to the Corps of Military Police (later Royal Military Police), and service with the 'Red-Caps' for the next 22 years. During his service with the 'Red-Caps' George was on active service in North Africa, and Italy during the Second World War, and post-war served during the counter-insurgency in Cyprus. After retiring from the Regular Army, circa 1961 he enlisted in the Territorial Army, joining the 4/5th Battalion Royal Hampshire Regiment (Territorial Army) based at Winchester, the unit being re-styled 'Wessex Regiment' in 1967. George was decorated with the British Empire Medal (Military Division) in 1967, after 33 years of military service. George married Vera Chalk at Aldershot, Hampshire, England, in 1961. George Robert Price, of, 64 Rowlings Road, Weeke, Winchester, Hampshire, England, is recorded as having died on 29 January 1988

The medals mounted for display in the court-style

Sold together with 'soft copy' of official recommendation for the BEM (ref WO 373/172/264)

A splendid and very scarce scarce grouping of medals, representing more then 3 x decades of service to a British soldier who served in order with the Dorset Regiment, Royal Military Police, Royal Hampshire Regiment and the Wessex Regiment

Condition: Mostly about GVF

Code: 20886

SOLD


A regimentally scarce South African War 'Mounted Infantry' medal pair: Private Walter Webb, 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, late Gordon Highlanders Mounted Infantry

A regimentally scarce South African War 'Mounted Infantry' medal pair: Private Walter Webb, 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, late Gordon Highlanders Mounted Infantry

- QSA:ROK, Pa, Jo, DH, & Wit (6249 Pte. W. Webb. Gordon Highrs:)
- KSA. 2 x clasps 'SA 01' & 'SA 02' (6249 Pte. W. Webb. Gordon Highrs.)

Note: A regimentally, only the men of the Gordon Highlanders Mounted Infantry detachment qualified for these 5 x battle clasps including 'Relief of Kimberley' on the Queens South Africa Medal

Important: Both medals and all clasps verified as entitled per the respective campaign medal rolls of the Gordon Highlanders, viz:

- Queen's South Africa Medal & 5 x clasps: Ref WO 100/203
- King's South Africa Medal & 2 x clasps: Ref WO 100/343

Walter Webb was a native of Maidenhead, Berkshire, England, where he was born circa October 1879. By trade a 'Bricklayer' he enlisted for the British Army at Aldershot, Hampshire, on 25 November 1897, and was posted to the Gordon Highlanders. Having seen active service in South Africa from 9 November 1899 - 22 October 1902, he remained in the British Army until taking his discharge on, 3 March 1903

The medals mounted as-worn in the swing-style. Suspended n silk ribands form a contemporary mounting bar, this latter retaining the original long hinged pin & clasp fittings

Sold together with hard-copy of the recipients extant service record

A rare and desirable medal clasp combination to the Gordon Highlanders

Condition: About VF

Code: 20885

SOLD


A Master Mariners & Old India Hand's South African War & Great War campaign medal group of 3: Captain David Liddell Livingston, British India Steam Navigation Company & late Sind Volunteer Rifles, Lumsden's Horse & Bombay Volunteer Cavalry

A Master Mariners & Old India Hand's South African War & Great War campaign medal group of 3: Captain David Liddell Livingston, British India Steam Navigation Company & late Sind Volunteer Rifles, Lumsden's Horse & Bombay Volunteer Cavalry

- QSA. 'CC' 'OFS' 'Joh' (229 Tpr. D. L. Livingstone, Lumsden's Horse)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (D. L. Livingston.)
- Mercantile Marine War Service Medal (D. L. Livingston.)

Important: QSA medal and all clasps verified, per respective medal roll:

- QSA Medal & clasps: Ref WO 100/258. Shown on roll as 'Livingston'

Note: Trooper Livingston is confirmed as having served with No. 4 Section, B Company, Lumsden's Horse. At the time of his enlistment his civilian occupation and address were recorded as, 2nd Officer British India Steam Navigation Company, Calcutta (ref The History of Lumsden's Horse - A Complete Record of the Corps from its Formation to its Disbandment (Pearce, 1903)).

David Liddel Livingston, second son of Thomas Gott Livingston (a Priest / Vicar of Addingham in 1881) and Charlotte Willmott Livingston (nee Borrett) was a native of, Little Salkeld, Penrith, Cumberland, England, where he was born on 11 June 1875. David was one of seven children in the Livingston family, he was the youngest son. David's siblings comprised his older brother (Thomas) and five sisters (Frances Elizabeth, Sarah Laura Charlotte, Mary Dorothea, Emma Alice and Lucy. David Livingston was educated at Loretto Public School, Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, where he was a boarder. After leaving school in 1891, David moved to Edinburgh, Scotland, and joined the Merchant Navy, his sailing career starting in 1891. On 28 December 1895, David obtained his Second Mates Certificate Of Competency for a Foreign Going Ship, having passed his exams at the Leith Marine Board Examinations. At the time of gaining his Second Mates Certificate his address was, 51 Gilmore Place, Edinburgh, Scotland. Shortly after gaining his 2nd Mates 'Ticket', David relocated to British India, where, he was, initially, based in Calcutta, and from where he sailed as a 2nd Officer with the British India Steam Navigation Company

Shortly after the outbreak of the South African War, David was one of a number of B.I.N.S. Co deck officers - many already serving in local Indian volunteer units - who took leave of their steamship employers and enlisted for overseas in the South African War, when they volunteered for service with the India raised 'Lumsden's Horse'

Lumsden's Horse, also known as Colonel Lumsden's Corps, was the name given to the Indian Mounted Infantry Corps, which was formed in Calcutta in 1899 by Lieutenant-Colonel Dugald McTavish Lumsden of the, Assam Valley Light Horse. The new corps was raised from volunteers from various existing Indian regiments, including the Assam Valley Light Horse. Colonel Lumsden contributed 50,000 rupees.

The Corps left Calcutta 250 strong in February 1900, consisting of two squadrons and a maxim gun detachment. It was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel D M Lumsden, of the Assam Valley Volunteers; while Lieutenant Colonel Eden C Showers, Commandant of the Surma Valley Light Horse, went as second in command with the rank of Major. 'A' Company sailed from Calcutta on 26th February 1900, and 'B' Company on 3rd March. 'A' Company landed at Cape Town and 'B' at East London, and both joined the army of Lord Roberts at Bloemfontein in April. On the 21st Lumsden's Horse marched out of camp to join General Tucker's Division, which had been holding the hills won at the battle of Karee Siding, 29th March. They were attached to a mounted infantry corps commanded by Colonel Ross, which consisted of Lumsden's Horse 240, Loch's Horse 220, West Riding and Oxford Light Infantry MI 220, and the 8th Battalion Regular MI 420.

On 29th April Ross received orders to make a demonstration against the Boer right, to draw them out, if possible, and allow Maxwell's Brigade to seize their position. Henry's Mounted Infantry were to co-operate. Lumsden's Horse occupied various spurs about 1500 yards from the Boer position; but the enemy moved out and took the offensive with vigour. Major Showers, who was exposing himself with rash bravery, was killed early in the action. So strong and determined was the enemy that Lumsden's men were ordered to retire. Lieutenant Crane, who with his section had been detached from Lieutenant Colonel Lumsden's command, did not receive this order. He and his men held on to the position which they were holding, and were cut off and captured. The casualties of the two squadrons in this their first engagement were most severe. Major Showers and 5 men were killed, and Lieutenant Crane and 5 non-commissioned officers and men were wounded. After the engagement, General Tucker complimented Lumsden's Horse, but 'rebuked' them for an exhibition of bravery which, he thought, bordered on rashness and the unnecessary courting of danger.

On 3rd May Lord Roberts commenced his advance to Pretoria. During this movement Lumsden's Horse scouted and skirmished in front of the right centre of the great army. At the Zand River on the 10th, at Viljoen's Drift on the Vaal on the 26th, and near Elandsfontein on the 29th, Ross's Mounted Infantry, including Lumsden's, did well, and their work was much praised by various correspondents. During the advance, and particularly after the Vaal was crossed, Lumsden's men had several casualties.

After the occupation of Pretoria, Lumsden's Horse were employed about Irene and at Springs, where they had the usual hard outpost work and some skirmishing. On 22nd July they marched into Pretoria and joined a force under Colonel Hickman, with whom they did some patrol work. About this time Lumsden's Horse left Colonel Ross, who issued an order in which he bestowed on them the highest possible compliments.

About the beginning of August the corps, now under Brigadier-General Mahon and General lan Hamilton, started on a march to Rustenburg, thence to the country north of Pretoria, and back to the capital, which was reached about the end of August. At Zilikat's Nek there was stiff fighting, in which the Berkshire Regiment did very well.

Mahon was now ordered to make a forced march to Carolina. He arrived there on 6th September in order to co-operate with French in the march to Barberton — a splendid effort on the part of all ranks.

Lumsden's Horse next took part in the march from Machododorp to Heidelberg along with the other troops of Generals French and Mahon. After some very severe fighting Heidelberg was reached on 26th October, and the corps then marched to Pretoria.

On 23rd November, 1900, Lumsden's Horse left Pretoria for India. Lord Roberts telegraphed to the Viceroy expressing his 'appreciation of their excellent services', and said: 'It has been a pride and a pleasure to me to have under my command a volunteer contingent which has so well upheld the honour of the Indian Empire'.

Men of Lumsden's Horse earned a number of orders and decorations for their services in South Africa including; 1 x C.B., 1 x C.M.G., 2 x D.S.O.'s & 6 x D.C.M's

After returning to India, David Liddel Livingston, returned to his employment with the B.I.N.S.co, subsequently relocating variously to Karachi (now in Pakistan) and Bombay, the two great port cities of the Arabian Sea. During his residence in those port cities, David served as a Volunteer with the Sind Volunteer Rifles (Karachi), and the Bombay Volunteer Cavalry respectively. On, 6 February 1904, David married Ruth Prudence Cuddy, at Bombay, India.

David Liddell Livingston, Master Mariner, is recorded as having died at Greenwich, London, England, on 18 October 1931 - and most likely considering his location of death, an event that occurred while he was in command of a ship (his index card from the Registrar General of Shipping and Seaman has some annotated notes pertaining to his death). His Merchant Navy registration index card with photograph identification is held and accessible at The National Archives, in the series ref BT350. Interestingly, his index card records his race as 'Scotch' - a proud honorary Scot!

A most interesting and scarce medal group to a most desirable South African War 'Colonial' unit - 'Lumsden's Horse'

Condition: About EF

Code: 20884

SOLD


A South African War era medal pair:  Private John Dodd, 3rd Volunteer Bn South Staffordshire Regiment late 2nd Volunteer Service Company Royal Welch Fusiliers attd 1st Bn  Royal Welch Fusiliers

A South African War era medal pair: Private John Dodd, 3rd Volunteer Bn South Staffordshire Regiment late 2nd Volunteer Service Company Royal Welch Fusiliers attd 1st Bn Royal Welch Fusiliers

- QSA: 'CC' 'OFS 'TR' '01' 02' (7551 Pte J.Dodd. Vol: Coy R.W.Fus:)
- Volunteer Force LSM. EDVII (99 Pte J.Dodd. 3/V.B.S.Stafford: Regt)

Important: Both medals & all clasps verified:

- QSA: Ref medal roll WO 100/181
- VFLSM: Ref Volunteer Gazette issue 21 August 1907

John Dodd, was a native of Aldgate, London, England, where he was born circa 1866. At the time of the South African War, John was by trade a 'Coach Wheeler', and a young widower with three children (sons Thomas, & James, and a daughter Elizabeth, who were living at, 8 Longmoor Street, Birmingham, England). In spite of being a 'Widower', John was already a serving volunteer in the 2nd Volunteer Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, when on, 4 February 1901, at Wrexham, Wales, he volunteered for overseas service, signing a 'Short Contract' for 1 x years service 'With the Colours'. John Dodd subsequently embarked for South Africa on 25 February 1901, as a member of the 2nd Volunteer Service Company, Royal Welsh Fusiliers - and was attached to 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers 'In The Field'. John Dodd served a total of 1 year and 95 days overseas in South Africa. John Dodd completed his engagement with the British Army on 28 June 1902, and thereafter continued to serve in the Volunteer Force with the 3rd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment

John Dodd's service papers for his South African service are extant and accessible at The National Archives, Kew, London

Condition: About GVF

Code: 20883

SOLD


A rare confirmed North China 'Tsingtao' 1914 Great War casualty medal group of 3: Private Walter John Meredith. 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers

A rare confirmed North China 'Tsingtao' 1914 Great War casualty medal group of 3: Private Walter John Meredith. 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers

- 1914-15 Star (10535 Pte. W. J. Meredith. S. Wales Bord.)
- British War Medal. Silver (10535 Pte. W. J. Meredith. S. Wales Bord.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (10535 Pte. W. J. Meredith. S. Wales Bord.)

Important: 10535 Private W. J. Meredith, confirmed 'Wounded-in-Action' Tsingtao, China, reference Casualty Lists

China 1914 Casualties: Total casualties of 2/SWB in China 1914 was 50 x 'All-Ranks; who were Killed-in-Action, Died of Wounds / Deed of Disease, or were Wounded-in-Action

Note: All medals verified as entitled per the respective Great War medal rolls referenced below:

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2842 (showing first entry to theatre of war 23 September 1914
- British War Medal & Inter-Alled Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1849

Walter J. Meredith was present in September 1914 with the 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, stationed at China where they formed part of the international garrison at Tientsin.

In September 1914 the Battalion, supported by half a Battalion of the 36th Sikhs, joined their Japanese allies in an expedition against the German occupied territory of Kiaochow and its port of Tsingtao. On 23 September the battalion’s embarkation of 22 officers and 910 men landed at Lao Shan Bay about forty miles N.E of Tsingtao and began the difficult trek to the well fortified main German settlement on Kiaochau Bay which was the object of the expeditionary force. Casualties were generally light although the extremely arduous conditions and bad weather caused them great discomfort. The nights of 5 and 6 November, however, brought the battalion heavier casualties than it had yet suffered and it likely that Meredith was wounded on one of these days.

Brigadier-General Nathaniel Barnardiston, Commanding Tsingtau Expeditionary Force gave the following details in his third Despatch:
‘On the 5th November I was ordered to prepare a Third Position of attack on the left bank of the river. This line was to a great extent enfiladed on both flanks by No. 1 and 2 redoubts, especially the latter from which annoying machine-gun fire was experienced. The bed of the river (a small stream running over a broad bed of sand) had also to be crossed, and in doing so the working parties of the 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers suffered somewhat severely, losing 8 non-commissioned officers and men killed and 24 wounded.’

The siege was soon brought to a successful conclusion with the assistance of an assault by Japanese forces present and the white flag went up on 7 November 1914, giving the Regiment the unique distinction of a battle honour held by no other British Regiment. The Battalion’s losses overall had been just 14 men killed or died of wounds or disease, and 2 officers and 34 men wounded.

Private W. J. Meredith is confirmed in the official list of casualties reported from North China, under date 25 November 1914. He later served with the Labour Corps in France and was discharged on 11 March 1919

Sold together with a quantity of hard copy research, including extracts from local & national newspapers with the recipient included in the casualty lists for North China

Walter James Meredith was a native of Clydach, Brecknockshire, Wales, where he was born on 16 March 1891. The 1891 National Census for England & Wales records Walter as being only 3 weeks old, and residing with his Grandparents Humphrey (Cola Miner) & Maria, and their daughters, Margaret Elizabeth Meredith (17) - employed as a General servant - & Lydia (12), at which time the family were living at, Gilwern Road, Llanelly, Crickhowell, Breconshire, Wales. Walter was educated locally, and attended Board School - his guardian shown as 'Humphrey Meredith' . By the time of the 1901 National Census for England 7 Wales, Walter described as a scholar is shown with a name change to 'Walter John Hoskins' (presumably the change in name reflected his father's surname, and or step-father. Whatever the 'Hoskins' connection, it is not a name that Walter ever associated witg again in his subsequent adult life. Basis extant analysis of 'Regimental Numbers' Walter had enlisted in the British Army, at the end of 1910, at which time he was allocated the regimental number No. 10535, when he was posted to his local infantry regiment. Walter served initially with the 1st Battalion South Wales Borderers, with which unit he completed his basic training, prior to being sent together with a large draft of men form 1/SWB to join the 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers, then serving overseas in South Africa (2/SWB transferred). At the time of the 1911 National Census for England & Wales, he is shown as serving with 1/SWB, at Chatham Barracks, Chatham, Kent, England, just prior to his deaprture overseas to join 2/SWB. In the period 1911-1914, Walter would have served with 2/SWB in Pretoria, South Africa, and then proceeded further afaield to the Far East, arriving in China in India, where the 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers were a garrison battalion located at Tienstin, September 1912 to October 1914. Sometime after being wounded in action, and still serving in the British Army, Walter was transferred to the Labour Corps, in which unit he held the regimental number No. 527694. Walter took his final discharge from the British Army, on 11 March 1919 (his Medal Index Card refers). An extant 'Pension Card' held by the Western Front Associtation, and in the series 358/05MM records Walter as living at, Aberbargoed, South Wales, at the time he corresponded and subitted his pension returns with the War Office. In the early post-war years, for a time, Walter worked as a Merchant Seaman. The extant identity card for Walter John Meredith, showing his date of birth as 16 March 1891, at Clydach, is held at The National Archives - and includes a photograph of him, showing that he was a Seaman from circa 1920. Walter married Elizabeth Ann Pearce, in Bedwelty, Monmouthshire, Wales, sometime during the third quarter of 1921. By the time of the compilation of the 1939 National Register for England & Wales, Walter is recorded therein employed as a 'Furnaceman' (Aluminium Alcan), married and residing with his wife and children at, 83 Maryvale Road, Birmingham, England. The widower Walter James Meredith is recorded to have died during the third quarter of 1976, his wife Elizabeth Ann Meredith, having preceded sometime during the third quarter of 1975

Sold together with a quantity of hard copy research, including extracts from local & national newspapers with the recipient included in the casualty lists for North China

A rare & desirable 'China 1914' British Army casualty group

Condition: GVF

Code: 20882

SOLD


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