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Kaisar-i-Hind. Bronze issue (Third Class). GVI issue breast badge with integral top brooch bar

Kaisar-i-Hind. Bronze issue (Third Class). GVI issue breast badge with integral top brooch bar

Important: The obverse design of this insignia is of the King George VI issue awarded between 1936-1948

Note: The medal retaining its original stitched silk riband, with integral top bar that retains the original hinged pin and clasp fittings, exactly as issued
When first instituted in 1900, the Kaisar-i-Hind, 'For Public Service in India,' was awarded in two grades or classes, vis Gold (1st Class) & Silver (2nd Class). In 1933, the KIH award series was expanded to include a Third Class of the insignia, to be awarded in 'Bronze'. The award continued to be awarded in all classes through to 1948, when the last gazetted awards were published. In independent India the KIH series of awards were subsequently replaced with the awards of the Padma Vibhushan, Padma Bhushan, and Padma Sri that were created by the government of the Republic of India in 1954​

A choice example virtually uncirculated

Condition: EF

Code: 20973

275.00 GBP


A most impressive Viceroys Best Shot & 'Kolar Gold Field' ensemble of Campaign & Best Shot medals to a former 'Carabinier': Corporal Hepburn Doig, Kolar Gold Field Volunteers (Auxiliary Force India) late 6th Dragoon Guards & 1st Dragoon Guards

A most impressive Viceroys Best Shot & 'Kolar Gold Field' ensemble of Campaign & Best Shot medals to a former 'Carabinier': Corporal Hepburn Doig, Kolar Gold Field Volunteers (Auxiliary Force India) late 6th Dragoon Guards & 1st Dragoon Guards

a).Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, 3 clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902 (5057 Pte. H. Doig. 1st Dragoon Gds.)

b). Viceroy of India Best Shot Medal: Presented by Lord Minto (Lc. Corpl. H. Doig 1910)

c). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Regimental Medal. 2nd type. Bronze 'Dewar Shield 1911 Runners up B. Company L. Cpl. H. Doig);

d). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Regimental Medal. 2nd type. Bronze 'The Dewar Shield 1915-16 “C” Coy. Runners up' (Corpl. H. Doig)

e). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Regimental Medal. 3rd type. Silver 'Dewar Shield won by Vol: Doig B. Co. K.G.F.V.

f). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Regimental Medal. 3rd type. Silver 'The Dewar Shield 1916-17 “C” Coy Winners' (L.-Sgt. H. Doig); Kolar Gold Field Vols

g). India v Transvaal Rifle Competition 1908-1909. Silver. Reverse engraved (Won by K.G.F. Vols 1908-9 Vol: H. Doig)

h). Indian Volunteer Rifle Association: Competition badge for 1911. With integral pin & clasp fittings
- Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Annual Shooting Competition Badge: Dated 1908. With integral pin & clasp fittings

i). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Annual Shooting Competition Badge: Dated 1910

j). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Annual Shooting Competition Badge: Dated 1913

l). Kolar Gold Field Volunteers Annual Shooting Competition Badge: Dated 1922

m). National Rifle Association: The Bell Medal. Bronze. With dated '1905' clasp & integral buckle brooch

n). National Rifle Association Medal. Rifle Clubs Medal. Bronze

o). Society of Miniature Rifle Clubs. Bronze. 'Field Marshal Roberts' Medal

Note: The Kolar Gold Field regimental medals all complete with original silk ribands and integral top bars with hinged pin and clasp fittings

Important: The QSA medal and all 3 x clasps verified per the respective campaign medal roll of the 1st King's Dragoon Guards (ref WO 100/112), the respective entry pages being signed at, Potchefstroom, South Africa, on 22 November 1902, and 4 April 1903. The latter roll entry under remarks showing that the recipient had transferred to the 6th Dragoon Guards - The Carabiniers - in which latter unit the recipient held the regimental number '5157'

India v Transvaal Annual Rifle Match: The competition was established in 1905, and was competed annually in India, and Transvaal between volunteer regiments in India and Transvaal (South Africa) respectively. Silver (Winners) and Bronze (Runners Up) medals - struck at the Calcutta Mint - were awarded to the winning and runner-up teams. During the period 1905-1911, the annual competition was won by the below following volunteer regiments;

- 1905-06: Bombay Volunteer Rifles (India)
- 1906-07: Scottish Horse (Transvaal)
- 1907-08: Transvaal Scottish (Transvaal)
- 1908-09: Kolar Gold Field Volunteers (India)
- 1909-10: Kolar Gold Field Volunteers (India)
- 1910-11: Simla Volunteers ('F' Company, Sanawar, India)

Hepburn Doig, son of Hepburn Elliott and Ellen Doig, was a native of, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, where he was born on 25 July 1881. Hepburn enlisted in the British Army on 30 January 1901, for a short service contract of '7 Years with the Colours & 5 Years on the Army Reserve', and on 1 February 1901, was posted to the 1st King's Dragoon Guards at Aldershot, England. Hepburn served in the South African with the 1st King's Dragoon Guards, and remained in South Africa between, 22 March 1902 to 24 January 1903. Hepburn never returned to the United Kingdom, while in the service of the British Army, and from South Africa proceeded to British India from, where he served from 25 January 1903, until the date that he took his discharge from the British Army on 29 January 1909. In India, Hepburn. served with the 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers), which regiment he had transferred to on 6 February 1903. Hepburn was a model soldier, whose conduct was described as 'Exemplary' with no entries for misconduct during his service. The highest rank attained during his service was Lance Corporal. During his service in South India, specifically in Mysore State (at the British Cantonment of Bangalore), Hepburn (25 years) married Elizabeth Maude Davies (17) a Eurasian girl from Kolar Gold Field, the couple being married at Bangalore on 19 September 1906. At the time of his wedding, Hepburn was holding the appointment of 'Lance-Corporal'. Evidently life in India appealed to Hepburn, and after taking his discharge form the British Army, he took up employment working in the Kolar Gold Field of Mysore State, and in which place he became a member of the Kolar Gold Field Volunteers. By 1910, Hepburn was holding the position of 'Cyanide Foreman' (by 1920 he was being described as an 'Amalgamator'), based at, Rogers Camp. Mysore Mine. On 5 June 1910, a son, David Alexander Doig, was born to Hepburn & Elizabeth Doig. Hepburn Elliott Doig, continued to work in India through the 1920's, but is recorded to have re-located to New Zealand by the time of the Second World War. Hepburn Elliott Doig, died at Motueka, Tasman District, Tasman, New Zealand, on 23 May 1967, where he is buried, and where a memorial plaque commemorates his military service in the South African War

The recipients service papers are extant and accessible at The National Archives

A very scarce grouping to a Scottish expatriate volunteer in the Kolar Gold Field, that includes a 'Best Shot' medal presented by the Viceroy of India, and multiple awards for shooting excellence at international, national (India) and regimental level

Condition: About VF

Code: 20972

SOLD


A 'Jock's confirmed 'Thrice Wounded in Action' 1914 Star trio: Gunner David Barclay, 1/6 Company 'Forth' Royal Garrison Artillery (Territorial Force) late 2nd & 1st Bs Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

A 'Jock's confirmed 'Thrice Wounded in Action' 1914 Star trio: Gunner David Barclay, 1/6 Company 'Forth' Royal Garrison Artillery (Territorial Force) late 2nd & 1st Bs Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

- 1914 Star. No clasp (9322 Pte D. Barclay. R.Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (9322 Pte D. Barclay. R.Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (9322 Pte D. Barclay. R.Highrs.)

Important: David Barclay confirmed 'Wounded-in-Action' on three separate occasions by Gunshot & Shrapnel Wounds (GSW), twice in 1914 (firstly Gunshot Wound to Head, secondly 'Shrapnel to his Back') & 9 May 1915 (Gunshot & Shrapnel Wound to Left Hand)

Identified Photograph: The 'Fife Free Press, and Kirkcaldy Guardian' issue of, 14 November, 1914, contained an identified photograph of the recipient, wearing Black Watch glengarry and white tunic with collar badges

Note: All medals verified as entitled per the respective Great War medal rolls of the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) as under:

- 1914 Star. No clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- British War & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/319

Note: In spite of his double wounds in 1914, the recipient was never issued and never subsequently claimed the dated clasps and roses to which he was eligible

First Hand Narrative Report: The 'Fife Free Press, and Kirkcaldy Guardian' issue of, 26 November, 1914,contains a lengthy narrative report given by David Barclay while on 'Furlough' recovering from his 'Wounds' in his home town.

Quote,

DYSART SOLDIER TWICE WOUNDED

THE "FREE PRESS" IN THE TRENCHES

Private David Barclay of the 1st Battalion Black Watch, is at present home on a short furlough, having been twice wounded in the fighting on the Continent. Interviewed at his mother's residence in Cross Street Dysart, by a "Free Press" representative. Private Barclay stated that he joined the Black Watch, on 9th October, 1902, and after three years with the colours, passed into the Reserve. He had only two months of his nine years reserve period to go when called up on the outbreak of war. Private Barclay told the story of his regiment's share in the fighting very modestly. The first "scrap" they had with the enemy was at a small village named "Jerusalem", on the same day as the Munster Fusiliers were severely cut up, and then commenced the historic retreat, in which the Black Watch took part in two or three rearguard actions. After they had turned about to advance again, and about two days before the real battle of the Aisne commenced, Private Barclay was wounded at Vindresse, through being struck on the head by a piece of shrapnel. He was put into the temporary hospital at the village of Mouline, on Monday 14th September, and the following day just as a number of them were leaving for the base hospital, the temporary hospital was shelled, and those who were able had to make off as best they could, being picked up tow or three miles further on by a motor transport. After being treated at St. Nazarre hospital, Private Barclay went into the Convalescent Camp, and later on to the Rest Camp, where 250 of the Black Watch Reserves were stationed. While there 100 of the men got word to keep themselves in readiness for returning to the front, where for nine days they took part in the battle of the Aisne, after which they were relieved and transferred to the left flank, which was now in Belgium. At La Bassee the Cameron's had got it pretty hot, and two platoons of the Black Watch were sent down to reinforce them. It was while they were advancing at this stage that Private Barclay was wounded for a second time, being wounded in the back by another piece of shrapnel. Asked as to the German rifle fire, Private Barclay said it was no good, but their shell fire was very dangerous, and one shell had knocked out about 100 French infantry. He had never taken part in a bayonet charge, but on one occasion, when they were ordered to charge the Germans, whenever the Teutons saw the bayonets they fled squealing like pigs. He had twice read the " Free Press" in the trenches, one of his comrades having it sent out to him regularly. They were eager to get the home news, and also read with interest the narratives of their comrades home from the front.

"GLENGARRIES AND DANCER'S SKIRTS"

The following descriptive account of a charge by the Highlanders is from a French paper, that publishes an English edition, and the cutting handed us by Private D. Barclay, Dysart, refers to the fighting near La Bassee, as described by a French officer, accompanying the Allied forces.

"At all costs it was necessary to create a diversion in order to give our gunners a chance of crossing the zone of fire. The General commanding the British forces claimed for his troops the honour of leading the attack. Then we saw the Scotsmen advance from our left wing. Without a moment's hesitation they plunged into the hail of shell. Without suffering great losses they approached nearer and nearer to the great guns. They stopped an instant to fix bayonets, and then charged to the sound of their beloved pipes. They charged like Sir Walter Scott's heroes, with their glengarries and dancer's skirts. Neither ditches nor barbed wire stopped these wonderful warriors. Their dash carried them right up to the guns, striking down the frightened artillerymen. It was the work of seconds only to remove the breech-blocks, and thus put the huge field pieces out of action. The whole affair lasted only ten minutes".

Unquote.

Third Time Wounded: The Fifeshire Advertiser issue of 22 May 1915, contained the below notice pertaining to David Barclay's 'Third Wound'

Quote,

WOUNDED FOR THE THIRD TIME

Mrs Barclay, Cross Street, Dysart, has received a postcard intimating that her son, Private David Barclay, of the 2nd Battalion Black Watch, has been wounded, and is lying in the base hospital in France. This is the third time Private Barclay has been wounded. He was home towards the end of last year. He returned to the fighting line in January, and took part in the fight at Neuve Chappelle.

Unquote.

David Barclay son of Alexander Barclay & Elizabeth Hain 'Betsy' Barclay (nee Bell) was a native of Dysart, Fife. Scotland, where he was born on 16 March 1885. By trade a 'Coal Miner', David, falsely declared his age to be 18 years and six months of age - he real age was 17 years &s ix months - when he enlisted in the British Army, at, Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland, on 9 October 1902 , on which date he was posted to the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch). Prior to his enlistment in the regular British Army, David had been serving as a volunteer in the Fife Royal Garrison Artillery (Militia). At time of attestation, David had contracted himself for a 'Short-Service' engagement with the British Army, that comprised 3 years 'With the Colours' and 9 years on the Army Reserve. David was posted to 1st Battalion Royal Highlanders, and served with 1/Royal Highlanders through to taking an 'early' transfer to the Army Reserve on, 27 January 1905. On return to civilian life, David returned to Scotland, where in 1907, he was cited in a paternity suit, pertaining to the birth of his daughter, Beatrice Jean Healy who was born in Dysart, Fife, on 18 December 1907. On, 2 September 1910, David married Elizabeth Canning, at Edinburgh, Scotland. On 5 August 1914, David was mobilized at Perth, Scotland, being recalled to the Black Watch Depot, and 2 days later was posted back to his former unit, 1st Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch)

At the time of the outbreak of the Great War, 1/Royal Highlanders was stationed at Aldershot, Hampshire, England, where it was part of 1st Brigade, 1st Division of the British Army. David Barclay, together with the rest of his unit, 1st Battalion Royal Highlanders (Black Watch). first entered theatre of war on 13 August 1914, when they embarked for France, landing at Le Havre the following day 14 August 1914. Although clearly entitled to a dated medal clasp to his 1914 Star, and being confirmed 'Wounded-in-Action' by 'Gunshot to the Head' on 28 October 1914, he never subsequently claimed or was awarded the 'Clasp & Roses' that he was entitled, and which, were never endorsed on the respective Medal Index Card or 1914 Star medal roll. During 1914-15, David served overseas in France & Flanders as under:

- 13/08/1914 - 24/10/1914 (served with 1st Bn Black Watch
- 20/01/1915 - 24/071915 (served with 2nd Bn Black Watch

On 8 October 1915, on completion of termination of his first period of engagement, David took his discharge from the British Army, having served 13 years, with the 'Black Watch', his military conduct being described as 'Exemplary'. Shortly after taking his discharge, David Barclay, re-enlisted in the British Army on 25 October 1915, at which time he joined the 1/6 Company 'Forth' Royal Garrison Artillery (Territorial Force), an artillery unit domiciled and generally deployed in the 'Firth of Forth' region on the east coast of Scotland. During his service with the 'Forth' Royal Garrison Artillery, Gunner Barclay remained on 'Home Service'. Gunner Barclay was transferred to the Class W. (T) Reserve on 12 December 1918, by which time time he had completed 3 years and 51 days in the Territorial Force

After taking his final discharge from the British Army, David Barclay gave his intended residence address as, 19 Cross Street, Dysart, Fife, Scotland. As a Coal Miner, David's service papers record that he was employed at the 'Earl of Rosslyn Colliery, Dysart, Fife, Scotland'

Excellent set(s) of extant service & pension papers for this recipient are held / accessible at The National Archives

Sold together with some copied hard-copy research

A superb group of medals to a 'Jock', who was thrice 'Wounded-in-Action', while serving in the 'Thick of It' with the Black Watch during the Great War, - all his wounds being sustained in the early fighting of 1914 & 1915, including being present at the the actions & battles of Vindresse, La Bassee, Aisne in 1914, and in 1915 at the Indian Corps battle of Neuve Chappelle

Condition: VF

Code: 20971

Reserved


'Shell-Shocked & Wounded' an Arbroath 'Jock's' casualty medal group of 3: Private David Sandeman Gordon Salkeld, 1/4th (Ross Highland) Bn Seaforth Highlanders (Territorial Force) late 'E Coy' 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Bn Black Watch

'Shell-Shocked & Wounded' an Arbroath 'Jock's' casualty medal group of 3: Private David Sandeman Gordon Salkeld, 1/4th (Ross Highland) Bn Seaforth Highlanders (Territorial Force) late 'E Coy' 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Bn Black Watch

- 1914 Star. With dated clasp (1703 Pte D Salkeld 1/5 R.Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (240255 Pte D Salkeld R.Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (240255 Pte D Salkeld. R.Highrs.)

Important: Private David Salkeld confirmed having been 'Shell-Shocked' earlier in the war while serving with 1/5 Black Watch, & later 'Wounded-in-Action' in France, in the week 20-26 July 1918, while serving with 1/4 Seaforth Highlanders, under higher formation 51st Highland Division during the 'Second Battle of the Marne'. The latter casualty recorded in No. 1 District No.1. Record Office Casualty List dated 10 August 1918 (Ref Wo 363 - First World War Service Records 'Burnt Documents')

Quote ('Arbroath Herald and Advertiser for the Montrose Burghs' issue of, 9 August 1918):

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL "5th" IN CASUALTY LIST

Pte. David Salkeld has been wounded and is in Brighton Hospital. A bullet entered the left knee while he was engaged in heavy fighting. He is the son of Mr Robert Salkeld, 19 Abbot Street, and is about twenty years of age. Private Salkeld suffered from shell shock about, eighteen months, ago, and had only been out in France this time for about four months. He was formerly employed at Abbey Leather Works

Unquote

Important: All medals & clasp verified as entitled & issued per the respective Great War medal rolls of the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) as under:

- 1914 Star. With dated clasp: Ref WO 329/2460
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1650

Important: A scarce instance of a 1/5 Black Watch 'Jock' being officially entitled & receiving a dated clasp to his 1914 Star (the battalion including the recipient first entered theatre of war 'France' on 1 November 1914)

David Sandeman Gordon Salkeld, son of Robert Salkeld (a leather 'Currier') & Catherine Salkeld (nee McNeill) was a native of, Arbroath, Forfarshire, Scotland, where he was born on, 3 October 1898. By the time of the 1901 National Census for Scotland, David is recorded as living with his parents and siblings at, 21 West Newgate Street, Arbroath, Scotland. in 1901, Robert had 4 x siblings comprising 3 x elder brothers, John, James & William. together with elder sister, Annie. A younger sister, Elizabeth, was born in 1902. David's mother died sometime in the in the first quarter of 1906, and sometime after that the family relocated to, 19 Abbot Street, Arbroath. David Salkeld was a teenager when he volunteered to join the Territorial Force of the British Army, in 1914, joining his local battalion 1/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Black Watch. On enlistment David was allocated the regimental '1703', and was only 16 years of age when he first entered theatre of war 'France' on 1 November 1914. In France, David, is recorded as having served with 'E Company' 1/5 BW, and enjoyed a period of 'Furlough' back in Scotland, in November 1915 (local newspapers refer). In 1916, 1/5 & 1/4 Black Watch (Territorial Force) Battalions were amalgamated to form 4/5th (Angus & Dundee) Battalion Black Watch, at which time David was allocated a new regimental number, vis 24025. Sometime in 1917, David was repatriated to the United Kingdom suffering from 'Shell-Shock'. In early 1918 - and deemed suitably recovered (?) - Private Salkeld - still a teenager, was returned to theatre of war 'France' having been transferred to 1/4 (Ross Highland) Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, in which unit he was allocated his final regimental number vis '235356'. While serving with 1/4 Seaforths - under higher formation '51st Highland Division' - David is confirmed having been 'Wounded-in-Action' during the 'Second Battle of the Marne'. At the time of being 'Wounded', David already a seasoned veteran, who had first served in the frontline in 1914 - was only 18 years of age. After being discharged from the British Army, David Salkeld, returned to Arbroath, Scotland, where he is recorded as having died on 7 June 1961, at the time of his death, he had been residing at, 26 Keptie Street, Arbroath

Sold together with some copied hard-copy research

Condition: VF

Code: 20970

275.00 GBP


An 'Old Contemptibles'  1914 Star & Long Service medal group of 4: Sergeant  Thomas Philip Nichols 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment

An 'Old Contemptibles' 1914 Star & Long Service medal group of 4: Sergeant Thomas Philip Nichols 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment

- 1914 Star. No clasp (8639 Cpl. T. P. Nichols. 2/North’n R.)
- British War Medal. Silver (8639 A. Sjt. T. P. Nichols. North’n. R.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (8639 A. Sjt. T. P. Nichols. North’n. R.)
- Military LS&GC. GV 1st type (5876501 Sjt. T. P. Nichols. North’n. R.)

Important: All campaign medals verified as entitled & issued per the respective Great War medal rolls of the Northamptonshire Regiment as under:

- 1914 Star (entitled to clasp & roses): Ref WO 329/2464
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1431

Thomas Phillip Nichols, fifth & youngest son of Richard William Robert Nichols (a 'Shoemaker') & Sarah Jane Nichols (nee Jones) was born at, Taunton, Somerset, England, 9 August 1886. Thomas lost his father in 1887, the same year in which Thomas and 3 of his elder brothers (Arthur Henry, Richard John & Percy Gilbert) were baptized on the same day at the parish, St Andrew's, Rowbarton, Taunton, Somerset, on 30 June 1887. In addition to the 3 x brothers already mentioned, Thomas had another 3 x elder siblings, viz brothers, Robert & Frederick, and a sister, Emma. By the time of the 1891 National Census for England & Wales, the Nichols family, headed by the widowed mother, Sarah (described as a Cook) was living in, Bristol, England, and at that time the family included, Thomas, with his elder sister, Emma, and elder brothers, Frederick Charles (who served 16 years in the British Army, firstly 8 years with the Black Watch, and secondly 8 years with the Northamptonshire Regiment - which was same regiment that his younger brother, Thomas Philip Nichols also served. Thomas enlisted in the British Army sometime during the Edwardian era, and in the 1911 National Census for England & Wales is shown residing with his sister Emma and brother-in-law, Arthur Henry Yoxall, at, 17 Brookland Terrace, Caerphilly near Cardiff, Wales, where he is described as a 'Soldier'. Thomas Philip Nichols was holding the rank of Corporal and serving with 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment when he first entered theatre of war 'France' on 8 November 1914, thereafter being quickly posted to the 'Frontline' and entitlement to the 'dated clasp and roses' for the 1914 Star. By the end of war, Thomas held the rank of 'Acting Sergeant', and continued to serve with the Northamptonshire Regiment in the immediate post-war year, being allocated a new unique 'Army Number' - 5876501 - from the block allocated to the Northamptonshire Regiment in 1920. Thomas, had taken his discharge from the British Army sometime prior to the 8th November 1924, as on that date he embarked on the ship 'Empress of Scotland' for destination, Canada, where he intended to live with his elder brother, Frederick. Interestingly, he described his profession on the immigration passenger card - and on his subsequent marriage certificate - as 'Musician', which likely indicates that served in the regimental band of the Northamptonshire Regiment as a 'Bandsman' (NCO / Bandsman) during his military service. His extant immigration passenger card shows that his destination residence in Canada, was to be with his elder brother, 'Frederick Charles Nichols' whose address was 'Mr F. C. Nichols, Chief of Police, Carelton Place, Ontario' (Frederick served as a Company Sergeant Major with the Canadian Corps of Military Police / Special Battalion in Canada, during the Great War). During his stay in Canada, Thomas Nichols, married, Elsie Partridge, at Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on 16 June 1926. The couple did not settle down in Canada as by the time of the compilation of the 1939 National Register for England & Wales, the couple were living with their two children, including son Norman (born 1 April 1933) at, 5 Paultow Road, Bristol, England, with Thomas shown as employed as a Warehouseman. Thomas Philip Nichols is recorded as having died at Bristol, England, sometime during the first quarter of 1965

The medals attractively mounted for display on a black, felt backed board, with a plasticated naming plaque applied

Condition: About VF

Code: 20969

SOLD


A 'World Wars' & Special Contabulary medal group of 5 : Lieutenant George Gilbert Crowther Garrard, Royal Engineers late 1st/4th Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry) & later Special Constabulary

A 'World Wars' & Special Contabulary medal group of 5 : Lieutenant George Gilbert Crowther Garrard, Royal Engineers late 1st/4th Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry) & later Special Constabulary

- 1914. With dated clasp (936 Pte. G. G. C. Garrard. H.A.C. (Inf))
- British War Medal. Silver (936 Cpl. G. G. C. Garrard. H.A.C. (Inf.))
- Interallied Victory Medal (936 Cpl. G. G. C. Garrard. H.A.C. (Inf.))
- Defence Medal
- Special Constabulary LSM. GV type II & 3 x clasps (George G. Garrard.)

The 3 x clasps on the SCLSM are; ‘Long Service, 1942’, ‘Long Service, 1945’, and ‘Long Service, 1952’

Note: All medals correctly officially impressed per Army protocols the pair showing the highest rank held while last serving 'In The Field' (the recipients subsequent commissioned service from 8 August 1915, was spent on 'Home Service')

Sold together with:

- Original medal transmittal letter for the Defence Medal
- Original named & addressed box of issue for Defence Medal
- Length of Defence Medal riband

See item codes & 20948 respectively for the recipients associated miniature medal group and his sons Second World War medal group

- 1914. With dated clasp : Ref WO 329/2414.
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/323
- Defence Medal: Transmittal letter & box for Defence Medal

George Gilbert Crowther Garrard, eldest son of Dr George Garrard, M.D. (a Surgeon who had been born in Hobart, Tasmania) and Mary Garrard (nee) was a native of Paddington, London, England, where he was born on, 6 April 1891. The 1901 National Census for England & Wales, records George as living at home together with his 3 x siblings comprising, elder sister Eva Mary A. Garrard & younger brothers, Thomas R. Garrard & Frederick B. Garrard (awarded Military Cross in Great War) and his younger sister Eva M A Garrard. In 1901, the family maintained a domestic establishment of 3, including a Governess, a Cook and a Housemaid. By 1911, the National Census for England & Wales shows George still living in the family home and described as a 'Student', with the Garrard family maintaining a domestic household of 4 x servants - very much an 'Upstairs - Downstairs' family of considerable means. George Crowther is recorded as having enlisted enlisted in the British Army on 4th August 1914, on which date he joined the 1st/4th (1st Battalion No 4 or 'D' Company) Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). George first entered theatre of war 'France' on 18 September 1914, and qualified for the 1914 Star with dated clasp - and almost certainly present with his unit at the 1st Battle of Ypres (Oct-Nov 1914). promoted to Corporal, George remained on active service in the field in France with the British Expeditionary Force, through to 12 May 1915. After returning to the United Kingdom, George, like the majority of H.A.C. volunteers who had survived the fighting of 1914 and early 1915, was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Engineers on 8 August 1915, when he was posted to 3/2 Field Company 'Home Counties' Divisional Engineers, Royal Engineers. George remained in uniform on 'Home Service' in the United Kingdom for the remainder of hostilities and never again returned to the 'Western Front' or on other 'Overseas Service'. During his 'Home Service' George held the rank of Lieutenant, and had served as Acting Captain. In 1919, and after taking his discharge from the British Army, George G. C. Garrard married his cousin - and next door neighbour - Gladys Lorna Garrard. The couple were blessed with a son, John Maurice George Garrard, who was born on, 28 March 1921. son of Garrard (Stockbroker's Clerk - ex H.A.C. (Inf) & Gladys Lorna Garrard (nee Garrard) was a native of, Eton, Buckinghamshire, England, where he was born on, 28 March 1921. The 'Garrard's' multi-generational family residence was located at;

'Braziers',
Cherry Tree Lane,
Iver Heath,
Eton,
Buckinghamshire,
England

By the time of the compilation of the 1939 National Register for England & Wales, George Garrard is recorded as employed as a 'Stockbrokers Clerk' residing at the 'Braziers' Eton address, with remarks that he was also a member of the 'Special Constabulary'. George Gilbert Crowther Garrard, of 'Braziers', Iver Heath, Eton, Buckinghamshire, England, is recorded as having died on, 12 May 1981

The officers service papers for Lieutenant George Gilbert Crowther Garrard are extant, and held & are accessible at The National Archives

The medals mounted in the swing-style suspended form original issue silk ribands, and as-worn by the recipient. The reverse of the medal mounting bar with long hinged pin and clasp fittings

Sold together with hard copy of the recipients Medal Index Card

A fine medal group to a 'Stockbrokers Clerk' who served his country in both World Wars including service with the Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry) in 1914-15, prior to being commissioned

Condition: GVF

Code: 20968

SOLD


A rare North China 'Tsingtao' veteran & later 'Gallipoli First Day Lander' Great War 'Killed-in-Action' casualty medal group of 3: Private George Alfred Wells. 2nd Bn South Wales Borderers

A rare North China 'Tsingtao' veteran & later 'Gallipoli First Day Lander' Great War 'Killed-in-Action' casualty medal group of 3: Private George Alfred Wells. 2nd Bn South Wales Borderers

- 1914-15 Star (8744 Pte G. A. Wells. S. Wales Bord.)
- British War Medal. Silver (8744 Pte G. A. Wells. S. Wales Bord.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (8744 Pte G. A. Wells. S. Wales Bord.)

Sold together with below original identity disc & ephemera:

- Original aluminium named Identity Disc (8744 G. Wells S.W.B.)
- Original addressed envelopes (2) for the medals,
- Original named card box of issue for medals - now flattened (a/f)
- Original medal transmittal letters (2) to recipients next of kin

Note: The medal transmittal letters to the next of kin, both, shamefully with clerical errors, one with wrong number & regiment, the other with corrected number

Important: 8744 Private George Alfred Wells, 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers, is confirmed 'Killed-in-Action' at Gallipoli, 28 April 1915 (2/SWB were amongst the 'First Day Landers at Cape Helles, 25 April 1915)

China 1914: In August 1914, 2nd Battalion, South Wales Borderers, were stationed at China where they formed part of the British garrison at Tientsin. In September 1914, 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers - including George Wells - and supported by half a battalion of the 36th Sikhs, joined their Japanese allies in an expedition against the German occupied territory of Kiaochau and its port of Tsingtao. On 23 September 1914, 2/SWB embarked 22 officers & 910 other-ranks who were landed at Lao Shan Bay about forty miles N.E of Tsingtao and began the difficult trek to the well fortified main German settlement on Kiaochau Bay which was the object of the expeditionary force. Casualties were generally light although the extremely arduous conditions and bad weather caused them great discomfort. Total casualties incurred by 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers in ,China 1914 - and the only British infantry regiment to see active service in China during the entire Great War, were 50 x 'All-Ranks, who were Killed-in-Action, Died of Wounds / Deed of Disease, or were Wounded-in-Action

Gallipoli: 2/SWB were the only Welsh infantry battalion to land at Gallipoli on 'Day 1' of the landings, on 25 April 1915, when they landed with a strength of an an estimated 1000 'All-Ranks'. At the end of the first day, 2/SWB had incurred; 2 x Officers killed; 3 x Officers wounded; 12 x Other Ranks killed; 40 x Other Ranks wounded and 6 x Other Ranks missing. By the end of the Gallipoli Campaign (January 1916) 2/SWB had incurred a total of 1054 'All-Ranks' either killed or missing, & 982 'All-Ranks' wounded. Between April 1915 and January 1916, from an initial start state of 1,000 all ranks, 2/SWB had a total throughput of 2410 'All-Ranks' by the end of the Gallipoli campaign - the battalion receiving numerous reinforcement drafts during the campaign to make good losses incurred by battle casualties and disease

Unique campaign distinction: 2/SWB was the only infantry unit of the entire British Army to have served in China 1914, and then at 'The Landings' at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915 - with 2/SWB earning for the South Wales Borderers the below battle honours that the regiment subsequently carried on their colours

- Tsingtao
- Landing at Helles

Note: All medals verified as entitled per the respective Great War medal rolls referenced below:

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2696
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1089

George Alfred Wells, second son of George Wells (Labourer) & Elizabeth Wells (nee Harrod) was a native of, Barking, Essex, England, where he was born on 18 December 1884. The 1891 National Census for England & Wales, records George as a 'scholar' residing at, 4 Sharps Cottages, Barking, Essex, together with both of his parents and seven other siblings comprising; 3 x brothers, Arthur (elder brother who died at Agra, India, 1917 serving with the Hampshire Regiment), Henry & Fred, and 4 x sisters, Emily, Annie, Jessie & Rosa. By the time of the 1901 Census, George's mother had died, and his widowed father, together with George and the rest of the family, were residing at, 41, Bonny Downs Road, East Ham, London, at which time George, was described as employed as a 'Barman' albeit only 16 years of age. Basis George's regimental number '8744', George is known to have enlisted into the British Army in early 1905, at which time he was posted to the South Wales Borderers. At the time of the 1911 National Census for England & Wales, George is shown as serving with 2/SWB, at Pretoria, South Africa. In the period 1911-1914, Walter would have served with 2/SWB in Pretoria, South Africa, and then proceeded further afield to the Far East, arriving in China, where the 2nd Battalion South Wales Borderers were a garrison battalion located at, Tientsin, September 1912 to October 1914. Shortly after the outbreak of the Great War, 2/SWB, together with George Wells, was selected as the only infantry battalion of the British Army (together with a half battalion of 36th Sikhs, of the British Indian Army) to enter theatre of war 'China', when on 23 September 1914, the battalion was landed at Lao Shan Bay for field service in the 'North China Campaign' at the siege and capture of the German colonial port at Tsingtao. On 4 December 1914, George together with the rest of 2/SWB was embarked at Hong Kong Colony bound for the United Kingdom. On arrival in the United Kingdom, 2/SWB was allocated to 87th Infantry Brigade under higher formation of 29th Division - an 'All-Regular' division of the British Army. George Alfred Wells disembarked, under fire, at Cape Helles 'Gallipoli' on 25 April 1915 - a 'First Day Lander' - and barely three days later was recorded as being 'Killed-in-Action'. After his death, George's personal effects and medals were forwarded to his nominated next of kin, Mrs Emily E. Wells, who became a War-Widow in 1917 (wife of his brother Arthur Wells), and who post-war was residing at, 5 Morley Road, Barking, Essex, England

Helles Memorial: near Sedd el Bahr, in Turkey, on the headland at the tip of the Gallipoli peninsula overlooking the Dardanelles.e service and supreme sacrifice of George Alfred Wells is commemorated in perpetuity by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, where his details are enshrined upon a regimental panel at the Helles Memorial, located near Sedd el Bahr, in Turkey, on the headland at the tip of the Gallipoli peninsula overlooking the Dardanelles. The memorial is the main Commonwealth battle memorial for the Gallipoli Campaign, and also commemorates the 20,956 Commonwealth servicemen, including Private George Alfred Wells, with no known grave, who died in the Gallipoli campaign 1915–1916, during the Great War

Sold together with some copied hard-copy research including medal roll entries and medal index card

A rare & desirable Great War casualty medal group with the recipient having first qualified for his 1914-15 trio for his service in China, and who then served at Gallipoli, where he had the distinction of being a 'First Day Lander' and who was 'Killed-in-Action' at Cape Helles only 3 days later!

Condition: Medals EF

Code: 20967

SOLD


A 'Jock's' well documented 'Loungeval - Deville Wood' Casualty & Prisoner of War medal group of 3: Pte Charles B Hepburn,  'A' Company, 8th Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highalnders)

A 'Jock's' well documented 'Loungeval - Deville Wood' Casualty & Prisoner of War medal group of 3: Pte Charles B Hepburn, 'A' Company, 8th Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highalnders)

- 1914-15 Star (S-2883. Pte. C. B. Hepburn, R.Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver (S-2883 Pte. C. B. Hepburn, R.Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-2883 Pte. C. B. Hepburn, R.Highrs.)

Note: The pair only with official corrections to rank & forename initials, and exactly as issued

Important: Private Charles Hepburn is confirmed having been Wounded-in-Action' (GSW to right shoulder) and captured as Prisoner-of- War, on 18 July 1916, while serving with 8th Battalion Black Watch at the Battle of Longueval & Delville Wood, during the Somme Offensive of July 1916

In captivity Private Hepburn was held at a 'Prisoner of War camp at Limburg, Germany (POW records refer)

Quote ('Fife Free Press, & Kirkcaldy Guardian, issue of 26 August 1916);

LESLIE MAN A PRISONER

Private Charles B. Hepburn, son of Private W. Hepburn, Black Watch, Leslie, was reported killed by his company officer after a battle. He was only wounded, however, and he writes from Germany, where he is a prisoner of war, telling his young wife and parents what kind of parcels to send

LESLIE SOLDIER PRISONER OF WAR

Private Charles B. Hepburn, Black Watch, son of Mr and Mrs William Hepburn, Prinlaws, Leslie, was recently reported missing. His brother, Private John Hepburn, who was in the same division, had little hope of his escape. The company officer wrote that Charles must have been killed. His father, Private W. Hepburn, Black Watch, who was with his regiment in the South, came home on leave to comfort the family, and the parish minister referred in the pulpit to Charles's death. Now it appears that Charles, who was married on the eve of his departure for the front, was wounded in the right shoulder, and that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He has written to his young wife, who resides in Falkland, asking her to proceed to Leslie and tell his parents what to send in the way of parcels

Unquote

In total the 8th Black Watch sustained 568 x casualties (killed, died, wounded and missing) at Longueval and Delville Wood, of which 137 'all-ranks' men killed, died of wounds or missing in action

Important: All medals & clasp verified as entitled & issued per the respective Great War medal rolls of the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) as under:

- 1914-15 Star: Ref WO 329/2741
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1351

Charles B. Hepburn, son of, William Hepburn, was a native of Fife, Scotland, where he had family ties to the towns and villages of, Cupar, Leslie & Falkland. In 1915, Charles proceeded overseas with the 8th Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) one of the newly raised 'Volunteer' battalions of Kitchener's New Army. He is recorded as first entering theatre of war, 'France' on 10 May 1915, on which date, Charles and his regiment disembarked at Boulogne. The 8/Black Watch served under higher formation '9th (Scottish) Division'. After only a few months of having landed in France, 8/BW fought at Loos in September 1915, and the following year were heavily engaged during the Somme Offensive. Charles fought, was wounded and captured, on 18 July 1916, during the epic Battle of Longueval and Delville Wood, where together with the South African Brigade (attached to 9th (Scottish) Division, 8/BW suffered terrible losses - after the battle the battalion only mustered 171 x all-ranks.... Initially reported missing, believed killed, Charles had fortunately defied the odds, and was later recorded as having survived and transported as a 'Prisoner of War' to Limburg, Germany, where he remained until being repatriated sometime after the armistice of November 1918. Charles Hepburn took his discharge from the British Army in 1919

Sold together with a quantity of copied hard-copy research, including 'Prisoner-of-War' records, and copied articles and named photograph from local Scottish newspapers

A splendid group of Great War medals to a lucky 'Jock' who survived Delville Wood!

Condition: VF

Code: 20966

SOLD


A 'Twice Blown Up' Wounded-in-Action, Jock's Great War & police long service medal group of 4: Private Frank Anderson Haughs, 8th Bn Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) later Special Constable, Angus Constabulary

A 'Twice Blown Up' Wounded-in-Action, Jock's Great War & police long service medal group of 4: Private Frank Anderson Haughs, 8th Bn Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) later Special Constable, Angus Constabulary

- 1914-15 Star (S-8653. Pte. F. A Haughs, R.Highrs.)
- British War Medal. Silver issue (S-8653 Pte. F. A Haughs, R.Highrs.)
- Interallied Victory Medal (S-8653 Pte. F. A Haughs, R.Highrs.)
- Special Constabulary LSM. GVI first type (Frank A. Haughs.)

Important: Private Frank Anderson Haughs is confirmed having been twice blown-up by shell and 'Wounded-in-Action' by gunshot & shrapnel wounds (GSW) while serving in France with the 8th Battalion Black Watch at the Battle of Longueval & Delville Wood, during the Somme Offensive of July 1916

Quote ('Montrose, Arbroath and Brechin review; and Forfar and Kincardineshire Advertiser, issue of, 11 August 1916):

Montrose Solder Twice Hit By Shells

Private Frank Haughs, writing on 31st July to his father, Mr William Haughs, grieve at Fordhouse of Dun, says that he has been wounded, and is in Stanley Hospital Liverpool. He states that the British and German positions at his section were, about a mile apart, between two woods. They went out at night their orders being to take the first three lines, which they did. While they were going through a village a shell landed beside Private Haughs, lifting him high in the air. He landed in a big shell hole. He received a wound in the head, which a comrade bound up, and advised him to go back to the dressing station, but he would not hear of that. Getting out of the hole after some difficulty, he met the doctor, who also advised him to go back. The doctor had no sooner left him when another shell landed close beside him, wounding him in the leg and arm. He crept back to the first line that had been captured, and from thence was conveyed back to the dressing-station. He remembered nothing else till he was being lowered into a barge, for conveyance to a place further back, prior to his removal to England. Private Haughs, who is Mr Haugh's youngest son, was a farm servant prior to enlisting in the Black Watch

Unquote

The above newspaper article places Private Haughs as serving with 8/Black Watch during the Somme Offensive being present and 'Wounded-in-Action' at Loungueval & Delville Wood between 14 - 21 July 1916

In total the 8th Black Watch sustained 568 x casualties (killed, died, wounded and missing) at Longueval and Delville Wood, of which 137 'all-ranks' men killed, died of wounds or missing in action

Important: All medals & clasp verified as entitled & issued per the respective Great War medal rolls of the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) as under:

- 1914-15 Star. With dated clasp: Ref WO 329/2741
- British War Medal & Interallied Victory Medals: Ref WO 329/1352

Important: The recipient's half-brother's brother's medals (a fellow 'Special Constable') are being sold separately on the website, see item code 20947

Frank Anderson Haughs - a unique name - was the eldest son of William Haughs & Agnes Ellis Haughs (nee Neave) was a native of, Dun, Forfarshire, Scotland, where he was born circa 1895. At the time of the 1901 Census for Scotland, Frank is recorded as living at the family home, at, Fordhouse Cottage, Dun, near Montrose, Forfarshire, Scotland, with his parents and - at the time - 5 x siblings, comprising elder brother Charles Haughs, and 4 x sisters vis, Isabel Haughs, Jean Haughs, Mary Haughs & Margaret Haughs. Prior to the Great War, Frank Haughs was employed as a 'Farm Servant'. During the Great War, Frank is recorded as having first entered theatre of war 'France' on 25 August 1915, while serving with 8th Battalion Black Watch (the medal rolls indicate that he also latterly served with 2nd Battalion Black Watch). After having been twice blown- up and wounded by gunshot and shrapnel wounds (GSW) at Longueval & Delville Wood during the Somme Offensive of July 1916, he was evacuated to England for recuperation. After recovering from his wounds, Frank Haughs latterly served with the 2/Black Watch. Frank Haughs was transferred to the Class Z Reserve on 9 April 1919

On, 27 May 1927, Frank Haughs married Christina 'Ina' Bruce Clark, at a civil ceremony held at the George Hotel, Montrose, Forfarshire, Scotland. Frank Haughs, was a well known farmer and prize-winning horseman in the Montrose area, and there are multiple references and articles pertaining to him published in the local Montrose area newspapers in the period circa 1925-1950. Frank Haughs, is recorded as having died at, North Snaddon, St. Cyrus, Kincardineshire, Scotland, on 14 April 1950, and his body was later interred at, Sleepyhillock Cemetery, St. Cyrus

The Special Constabulary Medal with some original lustre

Condition: mostly about GVF

Code: 20965

SOLD


An Orcadian's Great War era Merchant Navy & Royal Naval Reserve campaign medal group of 4: Deck-Hand George Reid Cassells, Royal Naval Reserve & Merchant Navy

An Orcadian's Great War era Merchant Navy & Royal Naval Reserve campaign medal group of 4: Deck-Hand George Reid Cassells, Royal Naval Reserve & Merchant Navy

- 1914-15 Star (S.D.753. G. R. Cassells. D.H. R.N.R.)
- British War Medal. Silver (753S.D. G. R. Cassells. D.H. R.N.R.)
- Mercantile Marine War Medal (George R. Cassells)
- Interallied Victory Medal (753S.D. G. R. Cassells. D.H. R.N.R.)

All medals verified as entitled / issued per below medal rolls & medal index cards:

- 1914-15 Star trio (ref medal roll ADM 171/120)
- Mercantile Marine War Medal (ref BT 351/1/22289)

Note: The recipients service papers show that he served aboard H.M.S. Cyclamen (an Arabis Class 'Sloop') from November 1915 (the ship was commissioned on 22 February 1922). In respect of his services during the Great War he was awarded a 'Hurt Certificate' on 28 February 1917, for having torn his left hand on a wire hawser on 17 February 1917, and his left middle finger having gone septic since. In addition to his war medals, including the Mercantile Marine War Medal, he was also awarded a share of Naval Prize Money amounting to 18 Pounds & 15 Shillings, that was issued to him in instalments 1920-22

George Reid Cassells, son of John James Cassells (a certified pedlar of smallware) and Barbara Cassells (nee Plank - a German national) was a native of, Kirkwall, Orkney Scotland, where he was born on, 7 December 1873. The 1891 National Census for Scotland, records George, 17 years of age, employed as an 'Apprentice Baker', living with his family at their residence located at, Catherine Place, Kirkwall, Orkney, the family then comprising his mother and older brother, Alexander A. Cassells (Mercantile Clerk) and a younger sister, Janet M. Cassells (a scholar). George joined the Royal Naval Reserve on 15 May 1915. Post-war, and now based from South Leith, George Cassells returned to his seafaring life with the Merchant Navy, and is recorded on several crew lists on ships plying the Trans-Atlantic routes, his ratings being shown as 'AB' for Able Seaman. in 1920, George married at South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland - the couple George Reid Cassells & Jane Sharp Cassells latterly residing at, 42 A Great Junction Street, Edinburgh. George's married life was, however, short-lived as he is recorded as having died in South Leith, on 6 September 1924, at the age of 49 years.

Note: The medals mounted for display in the swing style (the MMWM & Interallied Victory Medals worn in reverse order)

Condition: GVF

Code: 20964

215.00 GBP


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